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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
er cause went haltingly on and failed to give the support that would have made the charge a complete success. The Third Missouri went through and through the enemy, strewing the points and the road with rebel dead. Colonel Glover was unhorsed; Lieutenant-Colonel Carrick wounded in the shoulder. The brave Captain Mitchell received a serious wound, and other noble and daring spirits were killed and wounded. After cutting their way through the enemy for a mile and a half, the. main force of Texas cavalry came at them and forced them back — no support arriving, General McNeil making frantic but vain efforts to hurry the artillery up. We lost the advantages that would have resulted from this most brilliant charge. For twenty miles the enemy were driven with loss, and every one rejoiced at the supposed prospect of cutting them off at the St. Francis, but again delayed, the enemy made good their escape. Next morning a sharp engagement ensued between McNeil on this side and the rebels o
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
Cape, resolving to beat the rebels in reaching the town. Subsequent events demonstrated that the General's judgment was singularly correct. Thursday, marched to Jackson, twenty-three miles, and the General pushed to the Cape that night, twelve miles further. On Friday he established communications with St. Louis via Jonesboro, Imountain howitzers attached to the Second regiment M. S. M. was to the right of Welfley on a ridge still further out of town and commanding the approach by way of Jackson — this section under Captain McClanahan did admirable service, dismounting one of the enemy's pieces and doing fearful execution to his ranks. A section of rifle That night the little garrison lay on their arms, and the next morning, Sunday, twenty-sixth April, the enemy opened fire from two batteries, one posted on the Jackson road, the other near the Bloomfield road, at ten o'clock and fifteen minutes. Shortly after the engagement had commenced, another flag of truce was announced, and
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 187
ajor-General Sterling Price, commanding, I formally demand of you the immediate surrender, unconditionally, of the troops in Cape Girardeau and the adjoining forts, together with all the ammunition, stores and other property, belonging to the United States, in the same. If the surrender is made, I pledge myself to treat the troops as prisoners of war, and to parole and exchange them as soon as practicable. I shall scrupulously protect private property; no difference will be made in this partis, one posted on the Jackson road, the other near the Bloomfield road, at ten o'clock and fifteen minutes. Shortly after the engagement had commenced, another flag of truce was announced, and the following was brought in: headquarters confederate States forces, District of South-east Missouri, April 26, 1863. General: I have this moment arrived and learn that Colonel Carter has demanded the surrender of the forces in Cape Girardeau — the fortifications and Government property, which dem
Jonesboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
n Fredericktown it would be to find the enemy gone and on their way to seize the important post of Cape Girardeau, General McNeil instantly turned his column toward the Cape, resolving to beat the rebels in reaching the town. Subsequent events demonstrated that the General's judgment was singularly correct. Thursday, marched to Jackson, twenty-three miles, and the General pushed to the Cape that night, twelve miles further. On Friday he established communications with St. Louis via Jonesboro, Illinois, and brought the whole force into town. The garrison now stood as follows: A part of First Nebraska infantry under Lieutenant-Colonel Baumer, Commandant of the post; a few men of the Second Missouri artillery, under Captain Meisner--in all five hundred men, which, with McNeil's force, brought the total up to one thousand seven hundred men. Colonel Baumer, expecting an attack, had already prepared his plan of defence, which McNeil, on examination, pronounced unimprovable, and adopted
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
'clock A. M., marched, and with his little band camped four miles north of the Cape Girardeau road--thirty miles march — crossing one swamp, in which his train was stuck for the night. Part of the command, First Wisconsin, was sent on to occupy Dallas, and make reconnoissance in three different directions, under Colonel La Grange, Major Torrey, and Captain Paine. Wednesday succeeded in getting train through the swamp, and reached Dallas Wednesday night; found that Captain Paine had encountereDallas Wednesday night; found that Captain Paine had encountered a vidette of the enemy; rode over them and captured seven prisoners. Major Torrey had captured the Sergeant-Major of Colonel Jeffries's regiment. By separate examination of these prisoners it was clearly established that the enemy in force had taken possession of Fredericktown and were preparing for additional offensive operations. Becoming apprehensive that if he advanced on Fredericktown it would be to find the enemy gone and on their way to seize the important post of Cape Girardeau, Gen
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
s, simultaneously with the arrival of reenforcements, who doubtless were seen by them descending the river. General McNeil having determined to maintain the post to the last extremity, and fearing that the overwhelming force of the rebels might force him to his last resort, that is, retiring his whole force into Fort C, and battering the town down about their ears, the several steamboats arriving were seized and the large amount of public stores, teams, wagons, etc., were carried over to Illinois, so that if the town fell, its loss should be as harmless to the Government as possible. The women and children were also removed, and the little garrison then seemed as one man, resolved to do or die. All that caused any apprehension in the minds of the leading officers for the result, was the weakness of our left, and many a fervent prayer went up for the arrival of a gunboat to strengthen that point. At ten o'clock Saturday night, our pickets reported the arrival at their post of a f
Fredericktown (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
our brigades, being the First army corps Trans-Mississippi department, C. S. A. At nine o'clock P. M., Monday, he received orders to move from Bloomfield on Fredericktown. Tuesday, twenty-first, at four o'clock A. M., marched, and with his little band camped four miles north of the Cape Girardeau road--thirty miles march — cront-Major of Colonel Jeffries's regiment. By separate examination of these prisoners it was clearly established that the enemy in force had taken possession of Fredericktown and were preparing for additional offensive operations. Becoming apprehensive that if he advanced on Fredericktown it would be to find the enemy gone and on tFredericktown it would be to find the enemy gone and on their way to seize the important post of Cape Girardeau, General McNeil instantly turned his column toward the Cape, resolving to beat the rebels in reaching the town. Subsequent events demonstrated that the General's judgment was singularly correct. Thursday, marched to Jackson, twenty-three miles, and the General pushed to the C
St. Francois River (United States) (search for this): chapter 187
Doc. 177.-the Marmaduke raid into South-east Missouri. Editors Missouri Democrat: I wish to furnish you a brief sketch of the Marmaduke raid into South-East Missouri, and the memorable retreat of his ten thousand confederates from Cape Girardeau into Arkansas, having been an eye-witness of every move made, for and against, from Saturday, April twenty-fifth, to Saturday, May second, when Marmaduke was driven into Arkansas, at Chalk Bluff, on the St. Francois River. I do this to vindicate the truth of history, that thus far has not received full justice by the reports that have been put in circulation. On Monday, the twentieth of April, General McNeil with one thousand two hundred men and six pieces of artillery, was at Bloomfield, Stoddard County, and found that Missouri had been invaded by Marmaduke, with four brigades, being the First army corps Trans-Mississippi department, C. S. A. At nine o'clock P. M., Monday, he received orders to move from Bloomfield on Freder
Whitewater (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
d. The First Nebraska infantry proved that officers and men could be fully relied on in any emergency, and no one who witnessed or participated in the attempted storming of Cape Girardeau but will cheerfully award to them the highest praise. On Monday, at two o'clock P. M., General McNeil, without taking any rest — for Sunday night all hands were kept on the alert, expecting a night attack — started in pursuit of the retreating foe. That afternoon his wearied men marched sixteen miles to Whitewater, found the bridge destroyed, that General Vendever had made eight miles that day, engaged the enemy, and that part of one company of the Third Iowa had been gobbled up by them. The column from Cape Girardeau was not allowed to push on, prudential reasons ruling the order of advance next morning General McNeil, with the invaluable assistance of the First Wisconsin, under Colonel La Grange, rebuilt the bridge in three hours, and the column pressed on. Colonel Benjamin of the Second M. S. M.
Cape Girardeau (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 187
reat of his ten thousand confederates from Cape Girardeau into Arkansas, having been an eye-witness ittle band camped four miles north of the Cape Girardeau road--thirty miles march — crossing one swn their way to seize the important post of Cape Girardeau, General McNeil instantly turned his columicer Commanding U. S. Forces in and around Cape Girardeau: Sir: By order Major-General Sterling Prrender, unconditionally, of the troops in Cape Girardeau and the adjoining forts, together with allyour demand for a surrender of the post of Cape Girardeau. He thinks himself able to maintain its pas demanded the surrender of the forces in Cape Girardeau — the fortifications and Government proper. With my combined forces now surrounding Cape Girardeau, I deem it an easy task to storm and captuGeneral McNeil, Commanding U. S. Forces in Cape Girardeau. General McNeil, to this insulting dem been gobbled up by them. The column from Cape Girardeau was not allowed to push on, prudential rea[3 more...]<
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