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Doc. 192.-battle of Champion Hill, Miss. Colonel Spicely's report. headquarters Twenty-Fourth Indiana Vols., Champion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards's Depot, at which point the enemy were reported to be in force. My command being in advance, I was ordered by General McGinnis, commanding brigade, to move three companies of my command to the front. I immediately sent companies C, F, and I to the advance, and again resumed the line of march. At about ten o'clock in the morning, as we approached the hills, we were apprised by our cavalry a
May 16th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 202
H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards's Depot, at which point the enemy were reported to be in force. MyI have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. T. Spicely, Colonel Commanding Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers. Cincinnati commercial account. in camp, on the battle-field, near Edwards's Station, Miss., May 16, 1863. Four engagements in sixteen days show that the campaign in Mississippi is progressing in terrible earnestness; but their results indicate that it will soon close in triumphal success. We have defeated the rebels in four successive battles
May 17th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 202
Doc. 192.-battle of Champion Hill, Miss. Colonel Spicely's report. headquarters Twenty-Fourth Indiana Vols., Champion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards's Depot, at which point the enemy were reported to be in force. My command being in advance, I was ordered by General McGinnis, commanding brigade, to move three companies of my command to the front. I immediately sent companies C, F, and I to the advance, and again resumed the line of march. At about ten o'clock in the morning, as we approached the hills, we were apprised by our cavalry ad
o fifty thousand, were near Edwards's Depot, which is within a couple of miles of Big Black bridge, and said to be strongly fortified. We have not fought our way to their fortifications yet, and I can only say of them what I hear from others. Wirt Adams's rebel cavalry had been watching our movements since the fall of Jackson, and had probably formed a very correct opinion as to the point at which we were about to strike. I do not think General Grant anticipated a very formidable stand at thi about seven o'clock, General Hovey commenced moving toward Big Black River. A company of cavalry was thrown out as an advance-guard. They had proceeded but a short distance, when they were met by the enemy's cavalry, supposed to be a part of Wirt Adams's regiment. After a little skirmishing, the rebels fell back. Our cavalry did not follow them up. At about nine o'clock, the ground chosen by the rebels was reached. General Hovey's division was halted and formed into line of battle. Skirmi
J. H. Baldwin (search for this): chapter 202
their names be inscribed in the hearts of our people, and their memories revered as noble patriots and gallant soldiers. I shall feel the loss of these men, together with the loss to the service of the gallant Lieut.--Colonel Barter and Lieut. J. H. Baldwin, who are so severely wounded as to leave me without the benefit of their valuable assistance for a considerable time. I desire also to make mention of Capt. N. J. Bolton; Lieut. Daniel Smith; Lieut. Fred. T. Butler, and Assistant-Surgeon T. C. Williams, who were severely wounded while engaged in the gallant performance of their duty. Adjutant S. R. Henderson, and Capt. Hugh Irwin; Lieut. Smith, company C; Capt. F. M. Downey; Lieut. Frank Robbins, commanding company F, after Lieut. Baldwin fell; Capt. Chas. Jenkins; Capt. John B. Hutchens; Capt. Benj. F. Summers and Capt. Redburn, with their subordinate officers, are deserving special notice for the ability and zeal with which they performed their duty. The men, without excep
again fell back and formed a line, returning the enemy's fire, which was kept up for a considerable time. Here it was that our colors fell. The gallant Lieutenant-Colonel Barter, believing that the bearer was wounded, rushed forward, seized them, and waved them with cheers in the very face of the enemy. The flag-staff was shattered, and Lieutenant-Colonel Barter severely wounded. Being entirely out of ammunition, and overwhelmed in front, my command fell back near three hundred yards, and here the Eleventh and Twenty-fourth formed a new line, replenished their cartridge-boxes, and again advanced to the field. By this time we were sufficiently reenforcedtheir memories revered as noble patriots and gallant soldiers. I shall feel the loss of these men, together with the loss to the service of the gallant Lieut.--Colonel Barter and Lieut. J. H. Baldwin, who are so severely wounded as to leave me without the benefit of their valuable assistance for a considerable time. I desire a
Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 202
om my own observation on the field, I think it likely that our entire loss will reach three thousand. The situation last night was about as follows: General Hovey's division held the advance on the main Vicksburgh road, the same road that leads to Edwards's Station; behind them were General Logan's and General Quinby's divisions. General Sherman, with two divisions of his corps, was at Jackson, but was understood to have marching orders for this morning; Generals McArthur, Osterhaus, and Blair, with their respective divisions, were in the vicinity of Raymond, or to the left of Hovey. The rebels, in heavy force, variously estimated at from fifteen to fifty thousand, were near Edwards's Depot, which is within a couple of miles of Big Black bridge, and said to be strongly fortified. We have not fought our way to their fortifications yet, and I can only say of them what I hear from others. Wirt Adams's rebel cavalry had been watching our movements since the fall of Jackson, and had
N. J. Bolton (search for this): chapter 202
and fell at their post, nobly and gallantly performing their whole duty. Let their names be inscribed in the hearts of our people, and their memories revered as noble patriots and gallant soldiers. I shall feel the loss of these men, together with the loss to the service of the gallant Lieut.--Colonel Barter and Lieut. J. H. Baldwin, who are so severely wounded as to leave me without the benefit of their valuable assistance for a considerable time. I desire also to make mention of Capt. N. J. Bolton; Lieut. Daniel Smith; Lieut. Fred. T. Butler, and Assistant-Surgeon T. C. Williams, who were severely wounded while engaged in the gallant performance of their duty. Adjutant S. R. Henderson, and Capt. Hugh Irwin; Lieut. Smith, company C; Capt. F. M. Downey; Lieut. Frank Robbins, commanding company F, after Lieut. Baldwin fell; Capt. Chas. Jenkins; Capt. John B. Hutchens; Capt. Benj. F. Summers and Capt. Redburn, with their subordinate officers, are deserving special notice for the ab
Thomas M. Bowen (search for this): chapter 202
it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for General Grant's forces, and the total rout and demoralizati
S. G. Burbridge (search for this): chapter 202
ebels on our right, compelling them to move toward him. He sent for reenforcements several times, but did not receive them, and was thrown almost entirely on the defensive. His men acted bravely, however, succeeding, during the day, in capturing two thousand prisoners and twelve pieces of artillery. The rebels, severely punished on our right, fled to the left, only to fall into the net which General Smith's division acted as. Smith's command consists of two brigades — the First under General Burbridge, composed of the Twenty-third Wisconsin, Eighty-third Ohio, Sixteenth and Seventeenth Indiana, and Seventeenth Ohio battery; and the Second under Colonel Landrum, embracing the Nineteenth Kentucky, Forty-eighth Ohio, Seventy-seventh, Seventy-ninth, and One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois, and the Chicago Mercantile battery. The Mercantile claims to have killed General Lloyd Tilghman, with a shell from one of their guns. They say rebel prisoners inform them of the fact. General Quin
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