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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
d every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a complete victory for General Grant's forces, and the tot
Bolton's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
of Champion Hill, Miss. Colonel Spicely's report. headquarters Twenty-Fourth Indiana Vols., Champion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards's Depot, at which point the enemy were reported to be in force. My command being in advance, I was ordered by General McGinnis, commanding brigade, to move three companies of my command to the front. I immediately sent companies C, F, and I to the advance, and again resumed the line of march. At about ten o'clock in the morning, as we approached the hills, we were apprised by our cavalry advance that the enemy
Raymond (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
lts indicate that it will soon close in triumphal success. We have defeated the rebels in four successive battles on fields of their own choosing, and before to-morrow night we will probably increase the number to five. At Thompson's Hills, at Raymond, and at Jackson, they met us, and essayed to stop our progress, but signally failed. To-day they again gave us battle, and victory. I am at a loss to know by what name to designate the battle-field of to-day. The engagement may be known, ofQuinby's divisions. General Sherman, with two divisions of his corps, was at Jackson, but was understood to have marching orders for this morning; Generals McArthur, Osterhaus, and Blair, with their respective divisions, were in the vicinity of Raymond, or to the left of Hovey. The rebels, in heavy force, variously estimated at from fifteen to fifty thousand, were near Edwards's Depot, which is within a couple of miles of Big Black bridge, and said to be strongly fortified. We have not fough
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
f the first capture, and in one gallant dash took it, and every man belonging to it. The rebels made a desperate effort to recapture those batteries, but did not succeed. Our men, when subsequently compelled to fall back on the left, spiked all the guns which they could not get away. From statements made by prisoners and citizens, I think a just estimate of the rebel force will place the figures at thirty thousand. Pemberton was in the field in person. The confederate troops were from Georgia, South-Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Missouri. Bowen's command, which we whipped at Port Gibson, was there. A large portion of it was captured, among them fifty men and a captain from Gates's regiment of dismounted cavalry. The rebels concentrated three fourths of their men upon three divisions of our army, those of Logan, Hovey, and Quinby, so that they had really about seven thousand men more than we had in the engagement. The result of to-day's fight was a
Champion's Hill (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
Doc. 192.-battle of Champion Hill, Miss. Colonel Spicely's report. headquarters Twenty-Fourth Indiana Vols., Champion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant AdjChampion Hill, Miss., May 17, 1863. Captain Jos. H. Linsey, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade. sir: In pursuance to orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-fourth regiment Indiana volunteers, in the battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, oChampion Hill, Mississippi, on the sixteenth day of May, 1863. On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards'ls, we were apprised by our cavalry advance that the enemy were posted in force in front, on Champion Hill. General McGinnis then ordered me to form my line of battle on the right of the road leadinnd in less than an hour the enemy gave way, leaving our gallant troops in full possession of Champion Hill. But amid our rejoicing over this great victory, we are called upon to mourn the gallant
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
t it will soon close in triumphal success. We have defeated the rebels in four successive battles on fields of their own choosing, and before to-morrow night we will probably increase the number to five. At Thompson's Hills, at Raymond, and at Jackson, they met us, and essayed to stop our progress, but signally failed. To-day they again gave us battle, and victory. I am at a loss to know by what name to designate the battle-field of to-day. The engagement may be known, officially, hereafows: General Hovey's division held the advance on the main Vicksburgh road, the same road that leads to Edwards's Station; behind them were General Logan's and General Quinby's divisions. General Sherman, with two divisions of his corps, was at Jackson, but was understood to have marching orders for this morning; Generals McArthur, Osterhaus, and Blair, with their respective divisions, were in the vicinity of Raymond, or to the left of Hovey. The rebels, in heavy force, variously estimated at
Edward's Depot (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
On the sixteenth instant, at six o'clock A. M., we moved from our camp near Bolton's Depot, four miles from the distant battle-ground, in the direction of Edwards's Depot, at which point the enemy were reported to be in force. My command being in advance, I was ordered by General McGinnis, commanding brigade, to move three chat the enemy were posted in force in front, on Champion Hill. General McGinnis then ordered me to form my line of battle on the right of the road leading to Edwards's Depot. At half-past 10 A. M. our line of battle as a brigade was formed, and ready for action. A few minutes after I was informed by a signal-officer that there wsions, were in the vicinity of Raymond, or to the left of Hovey. The rebels, in heavy force, variously estimated at from fifteen to fifty thousand, were near Edwards's Depot, which is within a couple of miles of Big Black bridge, and said to be strongly fortified. We have not fought our way to their fortifications yet, and I can
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
the point at which we were about to strike. I do not think General Grant anticipated a very formidable stand at this place. Black River bridge is only important to the rebels as being necessary to hold their communication between Jackson and Vicksburgh. With Jackson in our possession, and the railroad destroyed at several points, it was thought they could gain nothing by fighting for the bridge, which is the only object of the battle commenced to-day. I say commenced to-day, because I belieenty-fourth Indiana rode to the rear, having received a wound in the hip. He rallied the terror-stricken by a few words of encouragement: Don't be discouraged, men. They are driving us now, but we'll have them whipped in an hour. We are taking Vicksburgh to-day, boys, and if you all do your duty it's bound to fall. On the rebel side an instance of valor occurred, in the conduct of Captain Riddle, of a Mississippi battery, who remained by the side of his guns after all his horses had been sho
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
but was not permitted to do so, lest he should expose Hovey's right, which he was intended to cover. The rebels came out of the woods at one time, and were forming for a the Thirtieth Illinois, every man of whom dashed at them, and drove them back in confusion. In the afternoon, on the extreme right, the Eighth Illinois and Thirty-second Ohio charged upon a battery and captured every gun. The Thirty-second will be remembered as one of the regiments surrendered by Colonel Tom Ford, at Harper's Ferry. They displayed great bravery during the engagement, and acted well every part assigned to them. Lieutenant-Colonel Snook, of the Sixty-eighth Ohio, was killed after the formation of his command into line of battle, and before his regiment had fired a single volley. One of his men had called his attention to a rebel flag, at the edge of the woods, about three hundred yards in front. He walked to the crest of a hill, at the foot of which his command was resting, and, while looking a
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 202
te was such that he had to keep his lines contracted and receive the full fire of the enemy, who was pouring in reinforcements and concentrating them upon his exposed ranks from a heavy timber cover. Hovey had not yet been reinforced, though he had seen the impossibility of holding his position, and had sent for support. The firing became terrible. Such an awful rattle of musketry as was kept up between Hovey's division and the almost concealed foe, was not heard upon the bloody fields of Shiloh or Donelson. Hovey held his ground with heroic tenacity for an hour and a half. Had he given way at first, the rebels would have turned our left, and the consequences could not have been other than disastrous. After a long and desperate struggle with an enemy of more than twice his numerical strength, and at every disadvantage of position, he was compelled to give way. He was forced back half a mile — retreating in excellent order, expecting every moment to meet reinforcements, and quic
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