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Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
uildings and fences which immediately adjoined them. Capt. Hart and Lieut. Blake, on their return, having given me to understand that I had a conditional authorization from Brig.-Gen. Hancock to transfer the brigade to the north bank of the Rappahannock, under the circumstances just mentioned, I assumed the responsibility of doing so. I did so under the impression of my being partially or conditionally authorized to do so. But this impression, a few hours later, I discovered to be erroneous. compels me in this case to offer a few facts. They are simply as follows: On the morning of the eleventh of December, we were in line at daybreak, and marched between three and four miles to the Lacey House, which stands on the bank of the Rappahannock, directly opposite Fredericksburgh. On arriving there we found that the engineer corps, which had been laying down the pontoon bridge during the night, and had succeeded in getting it about two thirds of the way across at daylight, had since
Potomac Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
and cursing their way through the mire, which is red as if it had all been soaked in blood. Long processions of cavalry winding their way like caravans, through the Virginian Sahara. The dismantled huts of deserted encampments, the camp-fires still smoking, showing that the troops were just put in motion. The tents and wigwams of the guards along the road, looking, in the chill wind that came down the ravines through hills spattered with snow, dismally uncomfortable. The bridge over Potomac Creek (the little Potomac) is a precarious thing in appearance, the track simply propped up on trestle-work of round logs, some seventy feet; and as the trains creep over the abyss, the impressions of the spectator are not, in the aggregate, comfortable. I hope the bridge is more substantial than it looks, for its fall would be an accident that would affect the whole army. When the train arrived at the depot, (or rather the stopping-place,) opposite to Fredericksburgh, the shades of night
Port Tobacco (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
nel, Dexter R. Wright, of the Fifteenth Connecticut volunteers. The first day we reached Uniontown, some two miles southerly from Washington City. We encamped the second day near Piscataway, and the third day about six miles northerly from Port Tobacco. We passed Port Tobacco about noon of the fourth day, and encamped for the night some six miles west of that place. The fifth day, in the midst of a cold and violent snow-storm, we encamped about one and a half miles from Liverpool Point, orPort Tobacco about noon of the fourth day, and encamped for the night some six miles west of that place. The fifth day, in the midst of a cold and violent snow-storm, we encamped about one and a half miles from Liverpool Point, or Bluebank, as it is sometimes called, a point on the Potomac nearly opposite Acquia Creek. On the morning of the sixth day, we broke camp and marched to Bluebank, where we were detained some eight hours awaiting transportation; the soldiers during that time being exposed to a keen, cold, and piercing wind which swept down the river and across the plateau where they were halted. My regiment was ferried across the Potomac about six o'clock Saturday evening. The weather was extremely cold, and
Uniontown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
arture from Camp Casey, near Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, including the battle of Fredericksburgh, on the thirteenth inst. My regiment moved from Camp Casey on the first inst., with the First brigade of Casey's division, consisting of the Fifteenth Connecticut, Thirteenth New-Hampshire, Twelfth Rhode Island, and Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seventh New-Jersey volunteers, under command of the senior Colonel, Dexter R. Wright, of the Fifteenth Connecticut volunteers. The first day we reached Uniontown, some two miles southerly from Washington City. We encamped the second day near Piscataway, and the third day about six miles northerly from Port Tobacco. We passed Port Tobacco about noon of the fourth day, and encamped for the night some six miles west of that place. The fifth day, in the midst of a cold and violent snow-storm, we encamped about one and a half miles from Liverpool Point, or Bluebank, as it is sometimes called, a point on the Potomac nearly opposite Acquia Creek. On t
Piscataway (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
burgh, on the thirteenth inst. My regiment moved from Camp Casey on the first inst., with the First brigade of Casey's division, consisting of the Fifteenth Connecticut, Thirteenth New-Hampshire, Twelfth Rhode Island, and Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seventh New-Jersey volunteers, under command of the senior Colonel, Dexter R. Wright, of the Fifteenth Connecticut volunteers. The first day we reached Uniontown, some two miles southerly from Washington City. We encamped the second day near Piscataway, and the third day about six miles northerly from Port Tobacco. We passed Port Tobacco about noon of the fourth day, and encamped for the night some six miles west of that place. The fifth day, in the midst of a cold and violent snow-storm, we encamped about one and a half miles from Liverpool Point, or Bluebank, as it is sometimes called, a point on the Potomac nearly opposite Acquia Creek. On the morning of the sixth day, we broke camp and marched to Bluebank, where we were detained s
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 27
e, and in all probability the last of some of them on earth. I have not space here to describe, as I would like to do, the mode in which the evening was spent. It will be sufficient to say that a savory article of whisky-punch was freely circulated, but that the conviviality did not become drunkenly uproarious. The punch seemed to cheer but not to inebriate. Many patriotic songs were sung with a fervor and melody most affecting and beautiful. I will never forget one, The hills of old New-England, (the officers were, without exception, New-Englanders,) or E Pluribus Unum, those not singing, shouting Never, never, at the words of the song that the nation would fall if the banner of stars were trailed in the dust. There was a solemn, touching charm about the singing of a song, the leading words of which were: Unfurl the glorious banner. Two of the young officers of the regiment of my friend, the colonel, whose rich voices swelled the song of the glorious banner that night, fell in
Liverpool Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
senior Colonel, Dexter R. Wright, of the Fifteenth Connecticut volunteers. The first day we reached Uniontown, some two miles southerly from Washington City. We encamped the second day near Piscataway, and the third day about six miles northerly from Port Tobacco. We passed Port Tobacco about noon of the fourth day, and encamped for the night some six miles west of that place. The fifth day, in the midst of a cold and violent snow-storm, we encamped about one and a half miles from Liverpool Point, or Bluebank, as it is sometimes called, a point on the Potomac nearly opposite Acquia Creek. On the morning of the sixth day, we broke camp and marched to Bluebank, where we were detained some eight hours awaiting transportation; the soldiers during that time being exposed to a keen, cold, and piercing wind which swept down the river and across the plateau where they were halted. My regiment was ferried across the Potomac about six o'clock Saturday evening. The weather was extremel
Alpine, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
eet; and as the trains creep over the abyss, the impressions of the spectator are not, in the aggregate, comfortable. I hope the bridge is more substantial than it looks, for its fall would be an accident that would affect the whole army. When the train arrived at the depot, (or rather the stopping-place,) opposite to Fredericksburgh, the shades of night were falling fast, as when Prof. Longfellow's young friend who had such an unaccountable proclivity for remarking Excelsior, reached an Alpine village. I was a stranger in a strange land and in a strange army. A journalist of my acquaintance, I had been informed, was enjoying the hospitalities of one of the generals of division, and I thought to inquire my way to him. An army of the dimensions of that of the Potomac, is as difficult to learn as a great city. One might think that every body in an army could tell where a certain major-general might be found. But the individual who would depend upon inquiries made under such a mis
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
s it is sometimes called, a point on the Potomac nearly opposite Acquia Creek. On the morning of the sixth day, we broke camp and marched to tremely cold, and the men suffered much from its severity. From Acquia Creek, where we landed, we marched about two miles and encamped in a rby ambulance or stretcher to the cars, by cars to the landing at Acquia Creek, and thence to Washington by steamboat. The principal battle ocapp, our special relief agent, was despatched from Washington to Acquia Creek to provide suitable accommodations for furnishing food or sheltein the accompanying schedule. Our supplies were brought up from Acquia Creek in every case in charge of a special messenger. By the schedule snugly folded in my pocket-book. The boat from Washington to Acquia Creek was crowded with officers and privates, returning to the army fr railroad is inadequate. The boat was behind time in reaching Acquia Creek, and the train for the army, with which it is supposed to connec
Nashua (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
otal wounded, thirty-four. missing — John F. Mulligan, shot through leg, and not since heard from, company F; company H, privates, Alvah Warren, Henry M. Woodbury; company K, privates John K. A. Hanson, John Harmon, Henry G. Thompson. Total missing, six. officers absent from tie battle.--Surgeon George B. Twitchell, detained at Washington; Captain N. D. Stoodley, sick in Washington; Captain Luther M. Wright, sick in quarters; Lieutenant G. Gillis, Adjutant, sick, and on furlough in Nashua, N. H., Lieutenant Edward Kilburn, sick in Alexandria; Lieutenant W. H. H. Young, sick in quarters. Major Houghton's report. headquarters Third regiment Michigan volunteers, camp Pitcher, Va., December 18, 1862. Captain G. W. Wilson, A. A. General: I have the honor to report the following as the part taken by the Third regiment Michigan volunteers in the battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, 1862. In accordance with brigade order, this regiment broke camp December eleven
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