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A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 27
c. 25.-battle of Fredericksburgh, Va. General Burnside's reports. headquarters of the army t there; none of his staff were there; but Gen. Burnside coming in half an hour or so after I had astaff, I repeated to him all I had said to Gen. Burnside, adding, however, that my principal objectidea entertained at Washington had been, that Burnside would force the passage of the river some twend spoke of the laugh that would be raised at Burnside's expense in that case. But I think a privat guns thumping through the fog. Presently General Burnside, with his staff and a few lancers, came finly killing more of them than the enemy. Gen. Burnside, I have since learned, sent orders to the in a single place. But so determined was Gen. Burnside to carry out his programme, that he ordereo put down the bridge, but again failed. General Burnside then proposed that a party of volunteers m that ten minutes. I looked at my watch. Gen. Burnside put every man into action that went in at [7 more...]
John W. Andrews (search for this): chapter 27
and men behaved with the utmost courage and bravery, and deserve the highest reward and esteem of their country. I have the honor to be, etc., Franklin Sawyer, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Eighth Ohio Volunteers. Official report of Colonel Andrews. Wilmington, Delaware, December 27, 1862. Captain Joseph W. Plume, A. A.A. G., French's Division. Captain: I have the honor to report the following, as the part taken by the Third brigade, under my command, in the attack on the enemyred in good order. Major T. A. Smyth in command, is represented as having displayed much coolness and ability. The list of casualties will be reported by Lieutenant-Colonel Marshall, now in command. Very respectfully, your ob't servant, John W. Andrews, Colonel Commanding Third Brigade. Lieutenant-Colonel Birney's report. Post of Thirty-Eighth N. Y. Volunteers, on the battle-field, December 15, 1862. To Captain John. L Cooney, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I respectfully sub
Joseph G. Hawkins (search for this): chapter 27
erer in common with others. In this encampment we remained until the next Tuesday afternoon, when we moved to this point, reaching here Wednesday afternoon. Our brigade was then broken up, and my regiment was assigned to the First brigade, (Colonel Hawkins,) Third division, (Brig.-Gen. Getty,) Ninth army corps, (Brig.-Gen. Wilcox,) in Major-Gen. Sumner's right grand division. This brigade is composed of the Ninth, (Hawkins's Zouaves,) Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Third New-York, Tenth andHawkins's Zouaves,) Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Third New-York, Tenth and Thirteenth New-Hampshire, and Twenty-fifth New-Jersey volunteers. On Wednesday evening we received orders to be ready to move the next morning. Thursday we were in line all day, ready and waiting orders to move and listening silently to the heavy cannonading and sharp musketry, principally on our right, or watching the smoke, rising from the burning buildings of Fredericksburgh, directly in our front. Just after dark we moved to the river, and crossed, without opposition, the pontoon-brid
my from shelling the town, as we had done? I asked several military gentlemen the question, for the situation appeared to me to be one of the deepest peril. One said: The enemy have not ammunition to spare. Another: Oh! a bombardment don't amount to any thing any how. Another: They don't care about bombing us, it is an inconsequential sort of business. We threw four thousand shells yesterday, and it amounted to nothing. Another: They're afraid of our siege-guns this side. Another: General Lee thinks he will have a big thing on us about the bombardment of this town. He proposes to rouse the indignation of the civilized world, as they call it. You'll see he won't throw a shell into it. He is playing for the sympathies of Europe. Another thought the enemy were skedaddling, and spoke of the laugh that would be raised at Burnside's expense in that case. But I think a private soldier came nearer the mark than any one else. He said, with the usual expletives: They want us to get
John Blake (search for this): chapter 27
nvinced that the hospitals were dangerously, if not fatally, exposed. I therefore sent two of my aids--Capt. Hart and Lieut. Blake--to Brig.-General Hancock, to request of him that he would be so good as to authorize me to take all that was left of so numerous as to require the assistance of all those who were unhurt. Even while I was waiting for Captain Hart and Lieut. Blake to return, several discharges of shell and Minie balls broke over and through the hospitals of the Sixty-ninth, the Sixty-third, the Eighty-eighth, and the buildings and fences which immediately adjoined them. Capt. Hart and Lieut. Blake, on their return, having given me to understand that I had a conditional authorization from Brig.-Gen. Hancock to transfer the diligent, and indefatigable in the discharge of his duties as Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of the brigade. Lieutenant John Blake, of the same regiment, displayed courage and soldiership of the highest order, but in doing so only continued to
William Hodgdon (search for this): chapter 27
ns, Colonel Thirteenth Regiment, New-Hampshire Volunteers. list of casualties in Thirteenth regiment New-Hampshire volunteers, at the battle of Fredericksburgh, Va., December thirteenth, 1862. killed--Company D, Private Lorenzo Phillips; Company H, Private James Knights. Total, two. wounded--Company A--Lieut. B. C. Carter, slightly in leg; Private N. W. Gray, thumb shot off. Company B--Corporal Geo. E. Cochrane, shot through wrist. Company G--Privates H. B. Nealy, in leg; Wm. Hodgdon, in knee; L. F. Smith, in hand; Geo. W. Colburn, in back. Company D--Sergeant A. J. Sherman, in foot; Corporal M A. Taylor, in ankle; Privates Thaddeus Quimby, in neck; James J. Young, in head; Charles Hoyt, in finger. Company E--Lieut. James M. Durell, in head; Privates Henry Nutter, in arm; David Chapman, in head; David Hogan, in hand. Company F--Sergeant E. E. Locke, in hand; Privates, A. Stevenson, finger shot off; Charles Leathers, in ankle; Gilman Hall, in foot. Company
Joseph W. Plume (search for this): chapter 27
, and Adjutant Lewis; among the killed was Sergeant-Major E. E. Henthorn, a most gallant and brave soldier. A full statement of our loss has been previously forwarded. My officers and men behaved with the utmost courage and bravery, and deserve the highest reward and esteem of their country. I have the honor to be, etc., Franklin Sawyer, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Eighth Ohio Volunteers. Official report of Colonel Andrews. Wilmington, Delaware, December 27, 1862. Captain Joseph W. Plume, A. A.A. G., French's Division. Captain: I have the honor to report the following, as the part taken by the Third brigade, under my command, in the attack on the enemy's works near Fredericksburgh. On the morning of the twelfth of December at half-past 7, the command, following General Kimball's brigade, and advancing by the left flank, crossed the pontoon-bridge, and formed line of battle in the main street of Fredericksburgh, the men keeping near their arms, and the roll being
Longfellow (search for this): chapter 27
recarious thing in appearance, the track simply propped up on trestle-work of round logs, some seventy feet; and as the trains creep over the abyss, the impressions of the spectator are not, in the aggregate, comfortable. I hope the bridge is more substantial than it looks, for its fall would be an accident that would affect the whole army. When the train arrived at the depot, (or rather the stopping-place,) opposite to Fredericksburgh, the shades of night were falling fast, as when Prof. Longfellow's young friend who had such an unaccountable proclivity for remarking Excelsior, reached an Alpine village. I was a stranger in a strange land and in a strange army. A journalist of my acquaintance, I had been informed, was enjoying the hospitalities of one of the generals of division, and I thought to inquire my way to him. An army of the dimensions of that of the Potomac, is as difficult to learn as a great city. One might think that every body in an army could tell where a certain
Henry Crump (search for this): chapter 27
idge was finished and this wing of the army crossed, and did not ourselves recross again until the night of the fifteenth instant. The following is a list of casualties of the Seventh infantry volunteers, on the eleventh and thirteenth of December, at the battle of Fredericksburgh: killed--Lieut. Frank Emery, company G; Privates, Alonzo Wixson, company A; George Castner, company A; Corporal Joseph L. Rice, company C; privates, George Gibbons, company C ; Stephen Balcomb, company G ; Henry Crump, company I. wounded--Lieut.-Colonel Henry Baxter, left shoulder, badly. Company A--Corporal Patrick Furlong, arm broken; privates, Reily Falkner, hand; John G. Clark, head slight. Company B--Privates, Ansil Billings, leg, slight; John Gibbs, hip; James E. Elliott, foot. Company C--Lieut. Henry M. Jackson, arm broken ; Sert. Charles Oakley, hand; Corporal George W. Vaughn, hand and arm. Company D--Privates, Jacob Lair, hip; Horace Roach, arm; Phineas Carter, leg; Edwin Gee,
was ordered by General Howard (our division commander) to take the First Minnesota and four other regiments (which had been placed under my command) and picket the most exposed portion of the line. Owing to the darkness and proximity to the enemy, and the want of a guide acquainted with the ground, the establishment of this line was a work of considerable difficulty and delicacy. In this work, as indeed on every occasion during the entire affair, Lieut.-Col. Colville, Major Adams, and Adjutant Peller rendered efficient aid. I regret here to note the loss of Corporal Irvine, Corporal Irvine has since returned on parole. of company D, who went by my orders to reconnoitre a point in front of our right, where we could hear the sound of intrenching tools. He did not return, and probably fell into the hands of the enemy. Finding that we were about four hundred yards from the rifle-pits of the enemy, and exposed to his batteries in the front and flank, I sent to the rear and procure
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