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December 10th (search for this): chapter 27
om the depot to the quarters of the officer of whom I proposed to make inquiry for a friend, I found myself in his tent, but the individual sought was not there, but was in a place where I was advised not to be in the morning, the little town of Falmouth, as it was supposed the rebels would give it their attention in the form of bomb-shells. The general was just about to start to meet the commander of his grand division, relative to the operations .impending. (This was Wednesday night, December tenth.) The determination had been reached to force the passage of the Rappahannock the next day. The troops had already three days rations prepared, and sixty rounds of cartridges had been given out. The day had been spent in making preparations for battle. I had been under the impression that no attempt would be made to cross the river at Fredericksburgh, as the strength of the position of the enemy was known to be immense; but was then assured that the bull was to be taken directly by the
December 14th (search for this): chapter 27
e battery which ceased firing. The enemy failing in their attempt to capture the battery, or drive us from our position, hastily retreated to the woods. I then moved by the rear rank to the rear of the battery, and reoccupied my first position, where I remained until after dark, when I received an order to place the regiment on picket, the right of my line resting upon the left of the pickets of General Robinson's brigade, and to prolong said line, in this position we remained until December fourteenth, eight o'clock P. M., when I was relieved by another regiment and ordered to occupy the position first assigned me, December thirteenth, in rear of the battery — in this position we remained until December fifteenth, at ten o'clock r.n., when we received orders to move to the rear, where we joined the brigade near the stone house, and marched left in front across the river, where we bivouacked for the night, and the next morning we were marched back to our old camp, where the regiment
manding the Irish Brigade. Colonel Stevens's report. headquarters Thirteenth regiment N. H. Vols., opposite Fredericksburgh, Va., December 22, 1862. To His Excellency Nathaniel S. Berry, Governor of New-Hampshire: sir: I have the honor to report to you the operations of the regiment under my command since their departure from Camp Casey, near Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, including the battle of Fredericksburgh, on the thirteenth inst. My regiment moved from Camp Casey on the first inst., with the First brigade of Casey's division, consisting of the Fifteenth Connecticut, Thirteenth New-Hampshire, Twelfth Rhode Island, and Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seventh New-Jersey volunteers, under command of the senior Colonel, Dexter R. Wright, of the Fifteenth Connecticut volunteers. The first day we reached Uniontown, some two miles southerly from Washington City. We encamped the second day near Piscataway, and the third day about six miles northerly from Port Tobacco. We passed
December 13th (search for this): chapter 27
ition assigned it in the brigade. After crossing the river, December thirteenth, the regiment marched nearly one mile down the river and wasgiment and ordered to occupy the position first assigned me, December thirteenth, in rear of the battery — in this position we remained untilassisted me upon the march and during the engagement of Saturday, December thirteenth; also Adjutant Geo. W. Remington and all officers and momen; private Sylvester Godfrey, Co. H, shoulder, slightly ; December thirteenth, private George Root, Co. A, shoulder, slightly. Total wouned, Esq.: sir: The report of the Battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, was brought to us by telegraph the night of the battle. Thshington by steamboat. The principal battle occurred on the thirteenth December, and on the twenty-fifth the last of the wounded were removeies of the Seventh infantry volunteers, on the eleventh and thirteenth of December, at the battle of Fredericksburgh: killed--Lieut. Frank
December 12th (search for this): chapter 27
ve the highest reward and esteem of their country. I have the honor to be, etc., Franklin Sawyer, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding Eighth Ohio Volunteers. Official report of Colonel Andrews. Wilmington, Delaware, December 27, 1862. Captain Joseph W. Plume, A. A.A. G., French's Division. Captain: I have the honor to report the following, as the part taken by the Third brigade, under my command, in the attack on the enemy's works near Fredericksburgh. On the morning of the twelfth of December at half-past 7, the command, following General Kimball's brigade, and advancing by the left flank, crossed the pontoon-bridge, and formed line of battle in the main street of Fredericksburgh, the men keeping near their arms, and the roll being called every hour. This evening, the Fourth New-York volunteers performed picket-duty. On the morning of the thirteenth, I received marching orders from division headquarters, and formed the brigade in the rear of Kimball in the following orde
December 11th (search for this): chapter 27
ion of Saturday, the thirteenth inst. On the Thursday morning previous, December eleven, at seven o'clock precisely, the brigade left the camp from which this repenth, 1862. In accordance with brigade order, this regiment broke camp December eleventh, at six o'clock A. M., and occupied the position assigned it in the brigacentre of the city, in support of Dickinson's battery. On the morning of December eleventh, when the contest commenced, we numbered two hundred and thirty-eight enl their native State. The following is the list of casualties: wounded, December eleventh, private Robert Rice, Co. C, mortally in abdomen; private Sylvester Godfr offer a few facts. They are simply as follows: On the morning of the eleventh of December, we were in line at daybreak, and marched between three and four miles te following is a list of casualties of the Seventh infantry volunteers, on the eleventh and thirteenth of December, at the battle of Fredericksburgh: killed--Lieut
October 30th (search for this): chapter 27
brigade hospitals, and to over fifty regimental hospitals previous to my leaving on the twenty-fourth December. The issue to regimental and brigade hospitals was continued by Dr. Andrew after my departure, an account of which will be hereafter furnished. I cannot close my report without referring you to the organization of the Medical Corps of the army during and subsequent to the last battle. The plan proposed by the Medical Director of the army of the Potomac, in his circular of October thirtieth, was first successfully carried into operation at this time. I respectfully refer you to that circular. Respectfully, J. H. Douglas, Assoc. Sec. Sanitary Commission. Chaplain A. H. Lung's letter. camp near Fredericksburgh, Va., headquarters Thirty-Third N. Y. V., Dec. 23, 1862. General Granger: my dear friend: The last few days have been days of excitement and interest to the army of the Potomac. They will be memorable in history when you and I are dead. On Thursda
December 15th (search for this): chapter 27
reoccupied my first position, where I remained until after dark, when I received an order to place the regiment on picket, the right of my line resting upon the left of the pickets of General Robinson's brigade, and to prolong said line, in this position we remained until December fourteenth, eight o'clock P. M., when I was relieved by another regiment and ordered to occupy the position first assigned me, December thirteenth, in rear of the battery — in this position we remained until December fifteenth, at ten o'clock r.n., when we received orders to move to the rear, where we joined the brigade near the stone house, and marched left in front across the river, where we bivouacked for the night, and the next morning we were marched back to our old camp, where the regiment is at present quartered. In closing this report permit me to bring before your attention the names of Captain E. S. Pierce and Captain I. S. Geer, both acting field-officers who ably assisted me upon the march and
December 19th (search for this): chapter 27
Doc. 25.-battle of Fredericksburgh, Va. General Burnside's reports. headquarters of the army of the Potomac, Falmouth, December 19. Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief, United States Army, Washington: General: I have the honor to offer the following reasons for moving the army of the Potomac across the Rappahannock, sooner than was anticipated by the President, Secretary of War, or yourself, and for crossing at a point different from the one indicated to you at our last leadership, is still ample for the task that has been set before it — that of conquering the capital of rebeldom. Farther reports of this battle will be given in the Supplement. M. H. Detroit free press account. near Falmouth, Va., December 19. Since the recent battle at Fredericksburgh I have noticed many accounts in our various Northern journals of the first crossing of the river by our troops. One says that a hundred volunteers from various regiments crossed first; another sa
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