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th Virginia, Col. Carey, is also supposed to be there, or ready to come, as houses have been cleared to be used as barracks for them. This regiment has lost a great many men by desertion, as the mass of them are conscripts, who invariably leave at the first opportunity-preferring to live in the bush rather than be soldiers. The mass of the Virginia troops say they will not go out of Virginia to go into winter quarters. Falmouth is a very old town, some of the houses dating as far back as 1717, and some claim a greater antiquity. A portion of the town has a neat; air about it, while the mass of the houses are old and ill-shaped. There is not a public house in the whole town, or any place for strangers to stop. The best houses are white frames, while the old antiquities are the old-fashioned bricks, with heavy garret-windows. Very few men are to be seen, but there are an abundance of women and children. During the silencing of the batteries across the river the utmost conster
November 11th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 51
Doc. 47-occupation of Falmouth, Va. Philadelphia Inquirer account. Falmouth, Va., November 11, 1862. the Federal army, under the immediate command of Gen. Sumner, arrived within a mile of this place about noon yesterday, having made the march from Warrenton, some forty miles, in two days and a half. This may be set down as very good marching, as the corps was encumbered with a very heavy train of baggage-wagons. Shortly after the army got in motion yesterday morning, cannonading was heard some four miles in our advance. No one seemed to understand it, as we had no forces in the direction of the sound. Parties were sent ahead to ascertain what it meant, when it was ascertained that a body of the enemy had crossed the Rappahannock as a reconnoitring party, and while marching down towards Falmouth, the rebels opened on them, causing some considerable consternation in their ranks. About a dozen rounds were fired before it was ascertained that they were firing on our o
G. W. K. Bailey (search for this): chapter 51
the road as we advanced. Gens. Sumner and Couch soon came to a conclusion that these batteries must be at once silenced, so that we might have free access along the river road. The Fifty-seventh New-York, Licut.-Col. Chapman commanding, and the Fifty-third Pennsylvania, Col. Brooks, advanced as skirmishers along the Falmouth road, until within a mile of the town. These two regiments were followed by the remainder of the brigade to which they belong, consisting of the Second Delaware, Col. Bailey; Sixty-sixth New-York, Colonel Pinkney, and the Fifty-second New-York, Col. Frank--the whole brigade commanded by Col. Zook, of the Fifty-seventh New-York. Capt. Pettit's battery, the First New-York artillery, and Owens's and Tompkins's two Rhode Island batteries followed. Instead of taking the main road, as the enemy thought the Federals would, that they might have a chance to pepper them, the commanding officer ordered them to make a detour around some high wooded hills into a valley
Henry Baxter (search for this): chapter 51
fact, the roads have been first-rate for the artillery and teams. During the march to this point our troops were in the very best spirits ; their merry, echoing voices rang through the forests, raising the spirits of the weary ones in the rear, all hurrying on to-ward this point. The Philadelphia brigade, known as Burns's, now commanded by Colonel Josh. Owens, of the gallant Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania, were in the left column during the march. They are in General Howard's division. Col. Baxter's regiment of Fire Zouaves have been consolidated, and now have ten companies instead of fifteen, as formerly. Yesterday morning one of the teams belonging to one of our batteries was out foraging for fodder, and got within a hundred yards of the enemy's cavalry pickets, they not observing the rebels. The teamster drove into a corn-field, the enemy not interfering in the least. The only reason we can give why they did not capture the whole party is, they feared it was a trap set to c
was ascertained that they were firing on our own troops. The fact of the rebels firing on their own troops proved to us that they had one or more batteries planted on the opposite shore, for the purpose of sweeping the road as we advanced. Gens. Sumner and Couch soon came to a conclusion that these batteries must be at once silenced, so that we might have free access along the river road. The Fifty-seventh New-York, Licut.-Col. Chapman commanding, and the Fifty-third Pennsylvania, Col. Brooks, advanced as skirmishers along the Falmouth road, until within a mile of the town. These two regiments were followed by the remainder of the brigade to which they belong, consisting of the Second Delaware, Col. Bailey; Sixty-sixth New-York, Colonel Pinkney, and the Fifty-second New-York, Col. Frank--the whole brigade commanded by Col. Zook, of the Fifty-seventh New-York. Capt. Pettit's battery, the First New-York artillery, and Owens's and Tompkins's two Rhode Island batteries followed.
John Burns (search for this): chapter 51
Gen. Hancock's division, and the remainder of the column. This morning has opened again threatening rain, but our army is safe, the mass of it having got over the roads; in fact, the roads have been first-rate for the artillery and teams. During the march to this point our troops were in the very best spirits ; their merry, echoing voices rang through the forests, raising the spirits of the weary ones in the rear, all hurrying on to-ward this point. The Philadelphia brigade, known as Burns's, now commanded by Colonel Josh. Owens, of the gallant Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania, were in the left column during the march. They are in General Howard's division. Col. Baxter's regiment of Fire Zouaves have been consolidated, and now have ten companies instead of fifteen, as formerly. Yesterday morning one of the teams belonging to one of our batteries was out foraging for fodder, and got within a hundred yards of the enemy's cavalry pickets, they not observing the rebels. The teams
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 51
they took a position at the ford opposite Fredericksburgh, to check the enemy attempting to cross over to Falmouth. Our cannonading was immense; the enemy could not stand its precision. Every shot fired went directly over the houses in this town, frightening the residents very much, as it came so unexpectedly. They had no idea of a Yankee army ever coming down here again. They presumed that if we attempted to go to Richmond it would be by the way of Gordonsville. This movement of General Burnside has completely taken them by surprise. As we stated in a previous despatch, our forces passed through Warrenton in three columns, Gen. Hancock on the right, General French the centre, and Gen. Howard on the left. This constitutes General touch's corps. The Ninth army corps, commanded by General---, and Couch's corps, are under the command of General Sumner. The troops took the direct road to Warrenton Junetion, early on Saturday morning, and encamped on the evening of that day in
d destroying all within our reach. A number of our troops, while overhauling a wheelwright shop, some miles from the tavern, found an Alabama ambulance, and some twenty-five shot-guns, with patterns for gun-stocks, etc. The guns were rather roughly handled, and the remnants left as mementoes of the past. It is said upon good authority that there are five Mississippi regiments and Major Crutch's rebel cavalry brigade in Fredericksburgh to dispute our crossing. The Thirtieth Virginia, Col. Carey, is also supposed to be there, or ready to come, as houses have been cleared to be used as barracks for them. This regiment has lost a great many men by desertion, as the mass of them are conscripts, who invariably leave at the first opportunity-preferring to live in the bush rather than be soldiers. The mass of the Virginia troops say they will not go out of Virginia to go into winter quarters. Falmouth is a very old town, some of the houses dating as far back as 1717, and some claim
David Chapman (search for this): chapter 51
in their ranks. About a dozen rounds were fired before it was ascertained that they were firing on our own troops. The fact of the rebels firing on their own troops proved to us that they had one or more batteries planted on the opposite shore, for the purpose of sweeping the road as we advanced. Gens. Sumner and Couch soon came to a conclusion that these batteries must be at once silenced, so that we might have free access along the river road. The Fifty-seventh New-York, Licut.-Col. Chapman commanding, and the Fifty-third Pennsylvania, Col. Brooks, advanced as skirmishers along the Falmouth road, until within a mile of the town. These two regiments were followed by the remainder of the brigade to which they belong, consisting of the Second Delaware, Col. Bailey; Sixty-sixth New-York, Colonel Pinkney, and the Fifty-second New-York, Col. Frank--the whole brigade commanded by Col. Zook, of the Fifty-seventh New-York. Capt. Pettit's battery, the First New-York artillery, and Ow
Henry Couch (search for this): chapter 51
d that they were firing on our own troops. The fact of the rebels firing on their own troops proved to us that they had one or more batteries planted on the opposite shore, for the purpose of sweeping the road as we advanced. Gens. Sumner and Couch soon came to a conclusion that these batteries must be at once silenced, so that we might have free access along the river road. The Fifty-seventh New-York, Licut.-Col. Chapman commanding, and the Fifty-third Pennsylvania, Col. Brooks, advanceevious despatch, our forces passed through Warrenton in three columns, Gen. Hancock on the right, General French the centre, and Gen. Howard on the left. This constitutes General touch's corps. The Ninth army corps, commanded by General---, and Couch's corps, are under the command of General Sumner. The troops took the direct road to Warrenton Junetion, early on Saturday morning, and encamped on the evening of that day in the vicinity of the Junction, and again started early on Sunday mornin
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