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Greenwich (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
rced him to change his front, I ordered the remainder of the army of the Potomac to Alexandria, and directed Gen. Burnside to prepare to evacuate Fredericksburgh and Acquia Creek. I determined, however, to hold this position as long as possible for a base of future operations. Gen. Pope's dispositions at this juncture were well planned. The corps of McDowell and Sigel, and the Pennsylvania reserves, under Reynolds, were pushed forward to Gainesville; Reno and Kearny were directed upon Greenwich, while Hooker's division was sent against Ewell along the railroad. Unfortunately, however, the movement was too late, as a large detachment of Lee's army was already east of Thoroughfare Gap. Hooker encountered the enemy near Kettle Run, and a sharp engagement ensued. This gallant division drove Ewell a distance of five miles, the enemy leaving their dead, and many of their wounded, on the field. As McDowell, Sigel, and Reynolds had reached their positions, there was now every prospec
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ubt its correctness. This gave me serious uneasiness for the safety of the capital and Maryland, and I repeatedly urged upon Gen. McClellan the necessity of promptly moving his army so as to form a junction with that of Gen. Pope. The evacuation of Harrison's Landing, however, was not commenced till the fourteenth, eleven days after it was ordered. Greatly discouraged at the prospect of timely aid from that quarter, I authorized Gen. Pope to order the main forces of General Cox, in Western Virginia, with all possible despatch by railroad, to join him via Washington. To facilitate the withdrawal of the army of the Potomac from the Peninsula, and to gain time by a demonstration against the enemy, Gen. Pope pushed his forces across the Rappahannock, occupied Culpeper and threatened Gordonsville. Jackson's and Ewell's forces were hurried to the Rapidan, and on the ninth of August encountered Banks's corps at Cedar Mountain. A hard-fought battle ensued, and on the arrival of reenfor
Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ace by the enemy cut off all connection between the forces of Gen. Grant and Gen. Buell, the former determined to attack and drive him from that position. Grant's forces moved in two columns, one on the north of the town under Major-General Ord, and the other on the south under Major-General Rosecrans. The enemy, finding himself likely to be surrounded, left the town and attacked the column of Gen. Rosecrans about four P. M. on the nineteenth of October. The engagement lasted until dark, Hamilton's division sustaining the brunt of the battle. Our men fought with great bravery, and completely routed the enemy, who fled in confusion, leaving their dead and most of their wounded on the field. We buried two hundred and fifty-five dead, took seven hundred or eight hundred wounded, and captured three hundred and sixty-one prisoners, over one thousand six hundred stand of arms, and a considerable quantity of stores. Our loss was one hundred and eight killed, six hundred and eleven wound
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
make the attempt upon Richmond with the additional twenty thousand, but immediately on my return to Washington he telegraphed that he would require thirty-five thousand, a force which it was impossible to send him without leaving Washington and Baltimore almost defenceless. The only alternative now left was to withdraw the army of the Potomac to some position where it could unite with that of Gen. Pope, and cover Washington at the same time that it operated against the enemy. After full consu of the third. His troops were immediately landed, and the transports sent back to General McClellan. About this time I received information that the enemy was preparing a large force to drive back Gen. Pope, and attack either Washington or Baltimore. The information was so direct and trustworthy that I could not doubt its correctness. This gave me serious uneasiness for the safety of the capital and Maryland, and I repeatedly urged upon Gen. McClellan the necessity of promptly moving his
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
width, from which the enemy's forces had recently been expelled, were rapidly decreasing in strength from the large numbers of soldiers sent home on account of real or pretended disability. On the other hand, the enemy's armies were greatly increased by an arbitrary and rigidly enforced conscription. With their superiority in numbers and discipline they boldly determined to reoccupy Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, and, if possible, to invade the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and an extended Indian insurrection on the Western frontiers. This plan had very many chances of success; but the timely order of the President of August fourth, calling for additional forces, and the patriotic response of the people of the North-West, thwarted the enemy's well-formed calculations. Gen. Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, through the States of Alab
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
e savages were vigorously attacked by a volunteer force under Brig.-Gen. Sibley, and defeated in several well-fought battles on the upper waters of the Minnesota River. These vigorous proceedings struck terror among the Indians and put an end to hostilities in that quarter for the present season. It is quite possible that these hostilities will be renewed in the coming spring, and preparations will be made accordingly. In the department of the Gulf, the withdrawal of our flotilla from Vicksburgh enabled the enemy to concentrate a considerable force on Baton Rouge, which was then held by Brig.-Gen. Williams. The attack was made on the fifth of August with greatly superior forces, under the rebel Gen. Breckinridge. Gen. Williams gained a most signal victory, but fell in the fight. Our loss was ninety killed, and two hundred and fifty wounded. We buried three hundred of the enemy's dead, left upon the field. On the sixteenth of August, the garrison of Baton Rouge was withdrawn to
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
Is there any reason why it should not be expected in this? It is easily understood that in a country like that between Yorktown and Richmond, or the thickly-wooded swamps of Mississippi and Louisiana, that a retreating force, by felling trees acrosmy, encourage rather than demoralize your troops. Moreover, you yourself suggested that a junction might be effected at Yorktown, but that a flank march across the Peninsula would be more hazardous than to retire to Fort Monroe. You will remember that Yorktown is two or three miles further from Richmond than Fredericksburgh is. Besides, the latter is between Richmond and Washington, and covers Washington from any attack by the enemy. The political effect of the withdrawal may at first look eans certain that the reduction of these fortifications would not require considerable time, perhaps as much as those at Yorktown. This delay might not only be fatal to the health of your army, but in the mean time Gen. Pope's forces would be expose
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
t the tenth of June. Major-Gen. Curtis's forces were at Helena, Arkansas, and those under Brig.-Gen. Schofield in South-western Missouri. The central army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line of West-Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, extendly enforced conscription. With their superiority in numbers and discipline they boldly determined to reoccupy Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, and, if possible, to invade the States of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, while our attention wasof the operations of General Grant's army are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 6. The unfortunate withdrawal to Missouri, by General Curtis, of a large part of the army in Arkansas, prevented the execution of the military operations which had been ordered in the latter State. In Missouri, the forces, under Brig.-Gen. Schofield, not only broke up and destroyed numerous guerrilla bands, but defeated the rebel army in several engagements near the south-west corner of the State, and drove
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ther column of the enemy had moved from East-Tennessee, after blockading Cumberland Gap, upon Lexington, and threatened Cincinnati. A small force of our raw troops, which had been pushed forward to Richmond, Ky., under Major-General Nelson, were met by the enemy and completely routed. In the mean time, every effort had been made to collect new troops at Cincinnati and Louisville, and to fortify these places against a coup de main. To give confidence to the new levies, a portion of Gen. Grant's army was withdrawn from Mississippi and sent to Kentucky and Cincinnati. No attack was attempted by the enemy. Major-Gen. Buell left Louisville on the first of October, with an army of about one hundred thousand men in pursuit of General Bragred. The withdrawal of a considerable part of Gen. Grant's army to reinforce Gen. Buell and to occupy Zanesville and Cincinnati, induced the enemy to renew operations in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee. A force of some five thousand
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line of West-Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, extended from Memphis to Iuka, ne they boldly determined to reoccupy Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky, and, if possible, to invade the States of n. Buell, turned his left, and, rapidly crossing the State of Tennessee, entered Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. Gagement. Another column of the enemy had moved from East-Tennessee, after blockading Cumberland Gap, upon Lexington, and thrhis battle, the main army of the Rebels retreated to East-Tennessee; Gen. Buell pursued it as far as Mount Vernon or London, enemy to renew operations in Northern Mississippi and Western Tennessee. A force of some five thousand or six thousand men victorious. These operations have restored peace in Western Tennessee. The official reports of the operations of General Gland, and the greater part of Virginia, Kentucky, and Middle Tennessee. It must be admitted that in these theatres of war t
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