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Berlin, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
he twenty-eighth of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unfortunate delay, I submit herewith, marked Exhibit No. 5. In reply to the telegraphic order of the sixth of October, quoted in my letter of the twenty-eighth, above referred to, Gen. McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the Potomac south of the Blue Ridge, and said that he would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the twenty-sixth of October, and then at Berlin. This passage occupied several days, and was completed about the third of November. What caused him to change his views, or what his plan of campaign was, I am ignorant; for about this time he ceased to communicate with me in regard to his operations, sending his reports directly to the President. On the fifth instant, I received the written order of the President relieving Gen. McClellan, and placing Gen. Burnside in command of the army of the Potomac. This order was transmitted by a
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
ecution of the military operations which had been ordered in the latter State. In Missouri, the forces, under Brig.-Gen. Schofield, not only broke up and destroyed numerous guerrilla bands, but defeated the rebel army in several engagements near the south-west corner of the State, and drove it across the Boston Mountains, in Arkansas. I cannot give the details of these engagements, as no official reports have been received. The Indian tribes in the North-West, and more particularly in Minnesota, incited, it is said, by rebel emissaries, committed numerous murders and other outrages on the frontiers during the latter part of the summer. These savages were vigorously attacked by a volunteer force under Brig.-Gen. Sibley, and defeated in several well-fought battles on the upper waters of the Minnesota River. These vigorous proceedings struck terror among the Indians and put an end to hostilities in that quarter for the present season. It is quite possible that these hostilities w
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
mmunicate with me in regard to his operations, sending his reports directly to the President. On the fifth instant, I received the written order of the President relieving Gen. McClellan, and placing Gen. Burnside in command of the army of the Potomac. This order was transmitted by a special messenger, who delivered it to Gen. McClellan at Rectortown on the seventh. When I left the department of the Mississippi in July last, the main body of the army under Major-Gen. Buell was between Huntsville and Stevenson, moving toward Chattanooga, for which place they had left Corinth about the tenth of June. Major-Gen. Curtis's forces were at Helena, Arkansas, and those under Brig.-Gen. Schofield in South-western Missouri. The central army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line of West-Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, extended from Memphis to Iuka, and protected the railroads from Columbus south, which were then our only channels of supply. These several armies spread along a line
Pocotaligo River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
d them, with the loss of their commander, a large number killed and wounded, and two hundred and sixty-eight prisoners. Our loss was eighteen killed and sixty-eight wounded. This victory opened the whole of that part of the country. General Butler's reports of the military operations in his department are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 7. (See Donaldsonville.) In the department of the South the only military operations which have been undertaken were the reconnoissances of the Pocotaligo and Coosahatchie Rivers. These expeditions under Brig.-Gen. Brannan and Col. Barton, encountered a considerable force of the enemy on the twenty-second of October, and engagements ensued, in which we lost thirty-two killed and one hundred and eighty wounded. The official reports of these engagements are submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 8 (See Pocotaligo, S. C.) In the department of North-Carolina our force has also been too small to attempt any important offensive operations. On
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
th Bragg, who, after capturing our garrison at Munfordsville, turned off from the main road to Louisville, along which Gen. Buell passed — the latter reaching Louisville without any engagement. AnothLouisville without any engagement. Another column of the enemy had moved from East-Tennessee, after blockading Cumberland Gap, upon Lexington, and threatened Cincinnati. A small force of our raw troops, which had been pushed forward to Ric routed. In the mean time, every effort had been made to collect new troops at Cincinnati and Louisville, and to fortify these places against a coup de main. To give confidence to the new levies, nt to Kentucky and Cincinnati. No attack was attempted by the enemy. Major-Gen. Buell left Louisville on the first of October, with an army of about one hundred thousand men in pursuit of General essee; Gen. Buell pursued it as far as Mount Vernon or London, then fell back to the line from Louisville to Nashville. Here Major-General Rosecrans superseded him in the command by the orders of the
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
resident relieving Gen. McClellan, and placing Gen. Burnside in command of the army of the Potomac. This order was transmitted by a special messenger, who delivered it to Gen. McClellan at Rectortown on the seventh. When I left the department of the Mississippi in July last, the main body of the army under Major-Gen. Buell was between Huntsville and Stevenson, moving toward Chattanooga, for which place they had left Corinth about the tenth of June. Major-Gen. Curtis's forces were at Helena, Arkansas, and those under Brig.-Gen. Schofield in South-western Missouri. The central army, under Major-Gen. Grant, occupying the line of West-Tennessee and Northern Mississippi, extended from Memphis to Iuka, and protected the railroads from Columbus south, which were then our only channels of supply. These several armies spread along a line of some six hundred miles from the western borders of Arkansas to Cumberland Gap, and occupying a strip of country more than one hundred and fifty miles
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
lo, Mississippi, through the States of Alabama and Georgia, reached Chattanooga in advance of Gen. Buell, turned his left, and, rapidly crossing the State of Tennessee, entered Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. Gen. Buell fell back upon Nashville, without giving the enemy battle — then followed, or rather moved parallel with Bragg, who, after capturing our garrison at Munfordsville, turned off from the main road to Louisville, along which Gen. Buell passed — the latter reaching Louisvil numbers engaged or the losses on either side have been received. After this battle, the main army of the Rebels retreated to East-Tennessee; Gen. Buell pursued it as far as Mount Vernon or London, then fell back to the line from Louisville to Nashville. Here Major-General Rosecrans superseded him in the command by the orders of the President. As the Secretary of War has ordered a military commission to investigate the operations of Gen. Buell in this campaign, it would be obviously improper
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
on the Rappahannock, by bringing McClellan's forces to Acquia Creek. Accordingly, on the thirtieth July, I telegraphed to on the third of August. In order that the transfer to Acquia Creek might be made as rapidly as possible, I authorized Gen.ely embark his troops at Newport News, transfer them to Acquia Creek, and take position opposite Fredericksburgh. This officer moved with great promptness, and reached Acquia Creek on the night of the third. His troops were immediately landed, anficient forces from the army of the Potomac would reach Acquia Creek to enable us to prevent any further advance of Lee, anden. Burnside to prepare to evacuate Fredericksburgh and Acquia Creek. I determined, however, to hold this position as long I am convinced that the order to withdraw this army to Acquia Creek will prove disastrous in the extreme to our cause. I fance, certainly to within twelve miles of Richmond. At Acquia Creek we would be seventy-five miles from Richmond, with land
Hatchie River (United States) (search for this): chapter 62
g foe was pursued only a few miles. On the thirtieth of October, General Grant ascertained that Generals Price and Van Dorn were concentrating their forces at Ripley, with the probable intention of attacking Corinth. The enemy crossed the Hatchie River, and took possession of the railroad north of Corinth, thus cutting off all direct communication with Jackson and Bolivar. He then advanced toward Corinth, and some skirmishing took place on the second of November. Major-General Rosecrans General Rosecrans. Other forces from Jackson and Bolivar, under Brig.-Gen. Hurlbut, were directed to march on Corinth by way of Middleton and Pocahontas, to cut off the enemy's retreat in that direction. They encountered the enemy on the Hatchie River, on the morning of the fifth, and as Brig.-Gen. Hurlbut was making dispositions for an attack, Major-Gen. Ord arrived upon the field and assumed command, but being wounded about eleven A. M. he again relinquished it to General Hurlbut. The b
Berkley (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 62
for times of peace, and are unsuited to the government of the army we now have, and the war in which we are now engaged. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Exhibit no. 1--a copy in cipher. Berkeley, Va., August 4--12 M. Major-General Halleck, Commander-in-Chief: Your telegram of last evening is received. I must confess that it has caused me the greatest pain I ever experienced, for I am convinced that the order to withdraw this army to Aest disaster from my country. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General. official copy. Headquarters, army, Washington, D. C., November 23, 1862. Exhibit no. 2. Washington, August 6, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan, Commanding, etc., Berkeley, Va.: General: Your telegram of yesterday was received this morning, and I immediately telegraphed a brief reply, promising to write you more fully by mail. You, General, certainly could not have been more pained at receiving my order than I w
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