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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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August 6th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 62
voting to the movement, one of the utmost delicacy and difficulty, whatever skill I may possess, whatever the result may be, and may God grant that I am mistaken in my forebodings. I shall at least have the internal satisfaction that I have written and spoken frankly, and have sought to do the best in my power to arrest disaster from my country. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General. official copy. Headquarters, army, Washington, D. C., November 23, 1862. Exhibit no. 2. Washington, August 6, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan, Commanding, etc., Berkeley, Va.: General: Your telegram of yesterday was received this morning, and I immediately telegraphed a brief reply, promising to write you more fully by mail. You, General, certainly could not have been more pained at receiving my order than I was at the necessity of issuing it. I was advised by high officers, in whose judgment I had great confidence, to make the order immediately on my arrival here, but I determined not to
October 30th (search for this): chapter 62
letely routed the enemy, who fled in confusion, leaving their dead and most of their wounded on the field. We buried two hundred and fifty-five dead, took seven hundred or eight hundred wounded, and captured three hundred and sixty-one prisoners, over one thousand six hundred stand of arms, and a considerable quantity of stores. Our loss was one hundred and eight killed, six hundred and eleven wounded, and seventeen missing. The retreating foe was pursued only a few miles. On the thirtieth of October, General Grant ascertained that Generals Price and Van Dorn were concentrating their forces at Ripley, with the probable intention of attacking Corinth. The enemy crossed the Hatchie River, and took possession of the railroad north of Corinth, thus cutting off all direct communication with Jackson and Bolivar. He then advanced toward Corinth, and some skirmishing took place on the second of November. Major-General Rosecrans commanded our forces at Gorinth, which consisted of the
October 28th (search for this): chapter 62
subordinate officers have been submitted. From the seventeenth of September till the twenty-sixth of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburgh and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe, and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the twenty-seventh, and my reply on the twenty-eighth of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unfortunate delay, I submit herewith, marked Exhibit No. 5. In reply to the telegraphic order of the sixth of October, quoted in my letter of the twenty-eighth, above referred to, Gen. McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the Potomac south of the Blue Ridge, and said that he would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the twenty-sixth of October, and then at Berlin. This pa
October 26th (search for this): chapter 62
of his operations in Maryland, including the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, is submitted herewith, marked Exhibit No. 4. No reports of his subordinate officers have been submitted. From the seventeenth of September till the twenty-sixth of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburgh and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe, and during the most favorable season for rapid m-eighth, above referred to, Gen. McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the Potomac south of the Blue Ridge, and said that he would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the twenty-sixth of October, and then at Berlin. This passage occupied several days, and was completed about the third of November. What caused him to change his views, or what his plan of campaign was, I am ignorant; for about this time he ceased to communicat
November 23rd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 62
heart, obey your order to the utmost of my power, devoting to the movement, one of the utmost delicacy and difficulty, whatever skill I may possess, whatever the result may be, and may God grant that I am mistaken in my forebodings. I shall at least have the internal satisfaction that I have written and spoken frankly, and have sought to do the best in my power to arrest disaster from my country. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General. official copy. Headquarters, army, Washington, D. C., November 23, 1862. Exhibit no. 2. Washington, August 6, 1862. Major-General George B. McClellan, Commanding, etc., Berkeley, Va.: General: Your telegram of yesterday was received this morning, and I immediately telegraphed a brief reply, promising to write you more fully by mail. You, General, certainly could not have been more pained at receiving my order than I was at the necessity of issuing it. I was advised by high officers, in whose judgment I had great confidence, to make the order i
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