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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Jerome Coon (search for this): chapter 84
ment surveys and township maps of the State of Mississippi, (found at Pontotoc,) under an escort of one hundred men. Major Coon, of the Second Iowa cavalry, with about one hundred men, was sent rapidly forward to strike the railroad at Coonawa stay been at Saltillo, eight miles north of Tupelo and that the rebels had fled south, abandoning Tupelo. Fearing that Major Coon might encounter too strong a foe, Lieut.-Col. Prince, Seventh Illinois cavalry, with about a hundred men, was sent promd back seven miles to a point where the Aberdeen road broke off to the south-cast, and on which it was ascertained that Major Coon had advanced, with a view of affording him support if needed. It was found that Major Coon had dashed into Coonawa in Major Coon had dashed into Coonawa in the afternoon, stampeded a small party of rebel cavalry, took a few prisoners, and made a strenuous but unsuccessful effort to capture a railroad train passing that station south. The train was tired upon by his advance on the full gallop, and one t
meat, sweet potatoes, and corn bread roasted in corn husks, and often without salt. Men and officers, however, were cheerful and prompt in every duty. In six days we marched about two hundred miles, worked two days at the railroad, captured about one hundred and fifty prisoners, destroyed thirty-four miles of important railroad and a large amount of public stores of the enemy, and returned, passing round an enemy of nine to our one, and reached camp without having a man killed, wounded, or captured. Col. Hatch, of the Second Iowa, commanding the Second brigade, Lieut. Cregs, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of my division, and Lieut. Davis, my Division Quartermaster, deserve special notice for their untiring and effective aid in accomplishing the results attained. Mr. Toffing, Topographical Engineer, accompanied the expedition, and collected matters for a very correct map of the roads over which we passed. T. Lyle Dickey, Colonel and Chief of Cavalry, Commanding Division.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 84
h meat, sweet potatoes, and corn bread roasted in corn husks, and often without salt. Men and officers, however, were cheerful and prompt in every duty. In six days we marched about two hundred miles, worked two days at the railroad, captured about one hundred and fifty prisoners, destroyed thirty-four miles of important railroad and a large amount of public stores of the enemy, and returned, passing round an enemy of nine to our one, and reached camp without having a man killed, wounded, or captured. Col. Hatch, of the Second Iowa, commanding the Second brigade, Lieut. Cregs, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of my division, and Lieut. Davis, my Division Quartermaster, deserve special notice for their untiring and effective aid in accomplishing the results attained. Mr. Toffing, Topographical Engineer, accompanied the expedition, and collected matters for a very correct map of the roads over which we passed. T. Lyle Dickey, Colonel and Chief of Cavalry, Commanding Division.
h as possible, was received about eleven o'clock on the night of the thirteenth instant, a few miles east of Walter Valley. Col. Hatch, commanding the Second brigade, was ordered to report to me at half-past 8 A. M., of the fourteenth, with eight hundred picked men from his command, properly officered, well mounted, well armed, and with fifty rounds of ammunition, with rations of hard bread and salt, and ready for six days scout, with no more wagons than necessary to haul the rations. Major Ricker, with a battalion of the Fifth Ohio cavalry, was sent to the south from Paris to make a demonstration toward Grenada, and the residue of the Second brigade was sent with the train to the rear, to camp upon the Yockna River. Colonel Mizener was ordered to take command of the First and Third brigades, to guard the crossings of the Osuckalofa River, and to make a strong cavalry reconnoissance toward Grenada on the Coffeeville route, reporting directly to Major-General U. S. Grant. At nine
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 84
he Mobile and Ohio Railroad. headquarters cavalry division, U. S. Forces, Thirteenth army corps, in the field, near Oxford, Miss., December 20, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel John A. Rawlins, A. A. General: Colonel: I beg leave to report to Major-Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding the department, that his order commanding me to take a part of my division of cavalry and strike the Mobile and Ohio Railroad as far south as practicable, and destroy it as much as possible, was received about eleven o'clock over. Colonel Mizener was ordered to take command of the First and Third brigades, to guard the crossings of the Osuckalofa River, and to make a strong cavalry reconnoissance toward Grenada on the Coffeeville route, reporting directly to Major-General U. S. Grant. At nine A. M., on Sunday, the fourteenth, with a small escort from company F, Fourth Illinois cavalry, under Lieut. Carter, and Colonel Hatch's detachment of eight hundred men from the Second Iowa cavalry, and the Seventh Illinois c
G. W. Carter (search for this): chapter 84
toward Grenada, and the residue of the Second brigade was sent with the train to the rear, to camp upon the Yockna River. Colonel Mizener was ordered to take command of the First and Third brigades, to guard the crossings of the Osuckalofa River, and to make a strong cavalry reconnoissance toward Grenada on the Coffeeville route, reporting directly to Major-General U. S. Grant. At nine A. M., on Sunday, the fourteenth, with a small escort from company F, Fourth Illinois cavalry, under Lieut. Carter, and Colonel Hatch's detachment of eight hundred men from the Second Iowa cavalry, and the Seventh Illinois cavalry, I took the road for Okolona, and reached Pontotoc, forty-five miles march, at half-past 9 on Monday morning. On the way we fell in with small scouting-parties of the enemy and captured several prisoners, by some of whom we were informed that a body of rebel infantry from Bragg's army were encamped five miles east of Pontotoc, on the road to Tupelo, and another near Tupelo
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 84
on Sunday, the fourteenth, with a small escort from company F, Fourth Illinois cavalry, under Lieut. Carter, and Colonel Hatch's detachment of eight hundred men from the Second Iowa cavalry, and the Seventh Illinois cavalry, I took the road for Okolona, and reached Pontotoc, forty-five miles march, at half-past 9 on Monday morning. On the way we fell in with small scouting-parties of the enemy and captured several prisoners, by some of whom we were informed that a body of rebel infantry from Bragg's army were encamped five miles east of Pontotoc, on the road to Tupelo, and another near Tupelo; and by others just returned from Columbus, that there was a strong rebel force at Okolona. A small party dashed off on the Tupelo road five or six miles, but found no enemy, At Pontotoc, the gentle rain through which we had marched, changed to a violent storm, and the roads were heavy. All our ambulance and prisoners were sent back from Pontotoc, with two wagon-loads of leather, and the Go
h meat, sweet potatoes, and corn bread roasted in corn husks, and often without salt. Men and officers, however, were cheerful and prompt in every duty. In six days we marched about two hundred miles, worked two days at the railroad, captured about one hundred and fifty prisoners, destroyed thirty-four miles of important railroad and a large amount of public stores of the enemy, and returned, passing round an enemy of nine to our one, and reached camp without having a man killed, wounded, or captured. Col. Hatch, of the Second Iowa, commanding the Second brigade, Lieut. Cregs, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of my division, and Lieut. Davis, my Division Quartermaster, deserve special notice for their untiring and effective aid in accomplishing the results attained. Mr. Toffing, Topographical Engineer, accompanied the expedition, and collected matters for a very correct map of the roads over which we passed. T. Lyle Dickey, Colonel and Chief of Cavalry, Commanding Division.
William H. Prince (search for this): chapter 84
t Saltillo, eight miles north of Tupelo and that the rebels had fled south, abandoning Tupelo. Fearing that Major Coon might encounter too strong a foe, Lieut.-Col. Prince, Seventh Illinois cavalry, with about a hundred men, was sent promptly into Tupelo, and the rest of the force was moved back seven miles to a point where thst ahead of him. The depot, containing commissary stores and corn, was burned, and small brides and trestle-work on the road near Coonawa were destroyed. Lieutenant-Col. Prince returned about three o'clock A. M., Tuesday, to our camp, having found no enemy in Tupelo, and having destroyed some trestle-work north of the town. The my was seen in Verona and Okolona, but fled — returning however, in some force to Okolona as our troopers were leaving that place on Wednesday afternoon. Lieut.-Col. Prince, with a party at Verona, on Tuesday, captured eighteen large boxes of infantry equipments, complete, some of them marked, Col. S. D. Roddy; several boxes of
with eight hundred picked men from his command, properly officered, well mounted, well armed, and with fifty rounds of ammunition, with rations of hard bread and salt, and ready for six days scout, with no more wagons than necessary to haul the rations. Major Ricker, with a battalion of the Fifth Ohio cavalry, was sent to the south from Paris to make a demonstration toward Grenada, and the residue of the Second brigade was sent with the train to the rear, to camp upon the Yockna River. Colonel Mizener was ordered to take command of the First and Third brigades, to guard the crossings of the Osuckalofa River, and to make a strong cavalry reconnoissance toward Grenada on the Coffeeville route, reporting directly to Major-General U. S. Grant. At nine A. M., on Sunday, the fourteenth, with a small escort from company F, Fourth Illinois cavalry, under Lieut. Carter, and Colonel Hatch's detachment of eight hundred men from the Second Iowa cavalry, and the Seventh Illinois cavalry, I too
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