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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
of despotism, where old men have been torn from their homes and immured in dungeons, where even the women have been subjected to the insults of the brutal Federal soldiery — that under the flag of the Confederacy Missouri will again be free. Kentucky, too, that gallant State whose cause is our cause, the gallantry of whose sons has never been questioned, is still the object of the ardent wishes of Gen. Bragg. I heard him say, in an address to his troops, that he hoped again to lead them into Kentucky and to the banks of the Ohio River. I can, then, say with confidence that our condition is in every respect greatly improved over what it was last year. Our armies have been augmented, our troops have been instructed and disciplined. The articles necessary for the support of our troops and our people, and from which the enemy's blockade has cut us off, are being produced in the Confederacy. Our manufactories have made rapid progress; so much is this the case, that I learn with e
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 95
orn from their homes and immured in dungeons, where even the women have been subjected to the insults of the brutal Federal soldiery — that under the flag of the Confederacy Missouri will again be free. Kentucky, too, that gallant State whose cause is our cause, the gallantry of whose sons has never been questioned, is still the object of the ardent wishes of Gen. Bragg. I heard him say, in an address to his troops, that he hoped again to lead them into Kentucky and to the banks of the Ohio River. I can, then, say with confidence that our condition is in every respect greatly improved over what it was last year. Our armies have been augmented, our troops have been instructed and disciplined. The articles necessary for the support of our troops and our people, and from which the enemy's blockade has cut us off, are being produced in the Confederacy. Our manufactories have made rapid progress; so much is this the case, that I learn with equal surprise and pleasure, from the Gen
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 95
sturbers of the peace of the world. Gathered together by Cromwell from the bogs and fens of the North of Ireland and of England, they commenced by disturbing the peace of their own country; they disturbed Holland, to which they fled, and they disturbed England on their return. They persecuted Catholics in England, and they hung Quakers and witches in America. Having been hurried into a war with a people so devoid of every mark of civilisation, you have no doubt wondered that I have not caEngland, and they hung Quakers and witches in America. Having been hurried into a war with a people so devoid of every mark of civilisation, you have no doubt wondered that I have not carried out the policy, which I had intended should be our policy, of fighting our battles on the fields of the enemy, instead of suffering him to fight them on ours. This was not the result of my will, but of the power of the enemy. They had at theence, the question of secession has been discussed with more of ability than it ever has been even in this country. Yet England still holds back, but France, the ally of other days, seems disposed to hold out to us the hand of fellowship. And when
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
r hand, right willingly will we grasp it. During the last year, the war has been characterized by varied fortunes. New-Orleans fell — a sad blow it was to the valley of the Mississippi, and as unexpected to me as to any one. Memphis also fell; issippi River and to open it to navigation, in order to appease the clamors of the West, and to utilize the capture of New-Orleans, which has thus far rendered them no service. The other is to seize upon the capital of the Confederacy, and hold thir communications with the trans-Mississippi department, and thwart the enemy's scheme of forcing navigation through to New-Orleans. By holding that section of the river between Port Hudson and Vicksburgh, we shall secure these results, and the people of the West, cut off from New-Orleans, will be driven to the East to seek a market for their products, and will be compelled to pay so much in the way of freights, that those products will be rendered almost valueless. Thus, I should not be surp
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
f Jefferson Davis before the Legislature of Mississippi, Dec. 26. Friends and Fellow-Citizens, Representatives and Senate of the State of Mississippi: After an absence of nearly two years I — that of an officer in service of the State of Mississippi. For, although in the discharge of my the law. But I am confident that the men of Mississippi have only to know that their soil is invadeends, will say that that State shall not be Mississippi. Let me repeat that there is much that thes one of the boys whose name sheds glory on Mississippi, and who, looking back from their distant cght hand and on the left. When I came to Mississippi I was uncertain in which direction the enembjugation by a ruthless foe, I felt that if Mississippi were destined for such a fate, I would wisht, he will drive the enemy from the soil of Mississippi. After having visited the army — after hot subject to his will; mine are fixed upon Mississippi. And when I return to where I shall find M[20 more...]<
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
with the intention of reenforcing the heavy column now descending the river. Vicksburgh and Port Hudson are the real points of attack. Every effort will be made to capture those places with the ob Let them all who have at heart the safety of the country, go without delay to Vicksburgh and Port Hudson; let them go for such length of time as they can spare — for thirty or sixty, or for ninety defore, and I hope that Johnston will find generals to support him if the enemy dare to land. Port Hudson is now strong. Vicksburgh will stand, and Port Hudson will stand; but let every man that canPort Hudson will stand; but let every man that can be spared from other vocations, hasten to defend them, and thus hold the Mississippi River, that great artery of the Confederacy, preserve our communications with the trans-Mississippi department, ae of forcing navigation through to New-Orleans. By holding that section of the river between Port Hudson and Vicksburgh, we shall secure these results, and the people of the West, cut off from New-O
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 95
e danger was to be braved and glory won. I thought to find that place which I believed to be suited to my capacity — that of an officer in service of the State of Mississippi. For, although in the discharge of my duties as President of the confederate States, I had determined to make no distinction between the various parts of the country — to know no separate State--yet my heart has always beat more warmly for Mississippi, and I have looked on Mississippi soldiers with a pride and emotion suchland and of England, they commenced by disturbing the peace of their own country; they disturbed Holland, to which they fled, and they disturbed England on their return. They persecuted Catholics in England, and they hung Quakers and witches in America. Having been hurried into a war with a people so devoid of every mark of civilisation, you have no doubt wondered that I have not carried out the policy, which I had intended should be our policy, of fighting our battles on the fields of the
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 95
property; will you renounce the exercise of those rights with which you were born and which were transmitted to you by your fathers? I feel that in addressing Mississippians the answer will be that their interests, even life itself, should be willingly laid down upon the altar of their country. By the memories of the past, by the glories of the field of Chalmette, where the Mississippians, in a general order of the day, were addressed as the bravest of the brave; by the glorious dead of Mexico, by the still more glorious dead of the battle-fields of the Confederacy, by the desolate widows and orphans whom the martyrs of the war have left behind them, by your maimed and wounded heroes — I invoke you not to delay a moment, but to rush forward and place yourself at the disposal of the State. I have been one of those who, from the beginning, looked forward to a long and bloody war; but I must frankly confess that its magnitude has exceeded my expectations. The enemy have displayed m
Grenada (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
ississippi from the North, with the object of taking Vicksburgh in the rear, while their navy would attack that place in front. Such was the programme which had been proclaimed for the invasion and subjugation of your State. But when I went to Grenada, I found that the enemy had retired from our front, and that nothing was to be seen of them but their backs. It is probable that they have abandoned that line, with the intention of reenforcing the heavy column now descending the river. Vicksbe who are so are those on whom the iron tread of the invader has fallen, or those who, skulking from their duty, go home with fearful tales to justify their desertion. Nor is the army despondent; on the contrary, it is confident of victory. At Grenada I found the only regret to be that the enemy had not come on. At Vicksburgh, even without reenforcements, the troops did not dream of defeat. I go, therefore, anxious but hopeful. My attachment to Misissippi, and my esteem for her people, have
Bowling Green (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 95
e been circulated, when accusations have been brought against it of weakness and inefficiency, often have I felt in my heart the struggle between the desire for justice and the duty not to give information to the enemy — because at such time the correction of error would have been injurious to the safety of the cause. Thus, that great and good man, General A. S. Johnston, was contented to rest beneath contumely and to be pointed at by the finger of scorn, because he did not advance from Bowling Green with the little army under his command. But month after month he maintained his post, keeping the enemy ignorant of the paucity of his numbers, and thus holding the invaders in check. I take this case as one instance; it is not the only one by far. The issue then being: will you be slaves; will you consent to be robbed of your property; will you renounce the exercise of those rights with which you were born and which were transmitted to you by your fathers? I feel that in addressin
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