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phia Inquirer account. Washington, January 1. Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, crossed the Rappahannock, above Burnside's army, on Saturday, the twenty-seventh ult., and advancing between Brentsville and Stafford Court-House, were joined by Hampton's Legion, when they made a combined attack on Dumfries, on the Lower Potomac, at two o'clock the same afternoon. Dumfries was garrisoned by a portion ofve friends here with us may know how we are faring. Since we have been here we have had a plentiful supply of rations, and we have succeeded in making our quarters reasonably comfortable. Every thing passed off very smoothly up to the twenty-seventh instant, but on that day Major-Gen. Stuart, of rebel raid notoriety, with two thousand five hundred cavalry and four pieces of artillery, disturbed the quiet of this unprepossessing locality, and attempted to displace us. About half-past 12 of Sa
January 1st (search for this): chapter 97
Doc. 89.-fight at Dumfries, Va. Philadelphia Inquirer account. Washington, January 1. Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, crossed the Rappahannock, above Burnside's army, on Saturday, the twenty-seventh ult., and advancing between Brentsville and Stafford Court-House, were joined by Hampton's Legion, when they made a combined attack on Dumfries, on the Lower Potomac, at two o'clock the same afternoon. Dumfries was garrisoned by a portion of Gen. Geary's division, consisting of the Fifth, Seventh, and Sixty-sixth Ohio regiments, (of the General's old brigade of veterans,) a section of the Sixth Maine battery and the Twelfth Illinois cavalry, all under command of Colonel Charles Candy. The enemy surprised the outpost pickets and captured about fifty of the First Maryland and Twelfth Illinois cavalry, a portion of which was a patrol. The rebels opened with artillery, shelling our troo
December 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 97
exception. of the reenforcements left at Dumfries, returned to Wolf Run Shoals, and at Tuesday noon reached camp, noar Fairfax. Dumfries was almost battered down by the immense number of shells thrown into it. This has been the most unsuccessful raid of Stuart, who, flushed with victory, came forward, but found his match. The only regret is, that all were not taken. None of our men were hurt, except at Dumfries. Urbana citizen account. Dumfries, Prince William Co., Va., December 29, 1862. friend Saxton: In the absence of your regular correspondent, I will attempt to furnish one of the series of letters from the Sixty-sixth Ohio, in order that those who have friends here with us may know how we are faring. Since we have been here we have had a plentiful supply of rations, and we have succeeded in making our quarters reasonably comfortable. Every thing passed off very smoothly up to the twenty-seventh instant, but on that day Major-Gen. Stuart, of rebel raid notor
Frank P. Blair (search for this): chapter 97
s, and this too with only about eight hundred infantry, three hundred cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. All the officers and men are highly elated with the success, and well they may be. On our side there were three killed and nine wounded, and about thirty taken prisoners. Not a man of our regiment was either killed or wounded, but nine were taken prisoners while on picket. Their names are as follows: Corporal G. B. Light; privates L. W. Bryan, Chidister, and Stokes, company A; privates Blair, Hendershot and Kesocker, company D; privates — Beightler and Constant, company F. Gen. Slocum, commanding Twelfth army corps, came in last evening. He had heard of the attack, and feared that we had been taken prisoners, and so started with a strong force for our relief. He reviewed us this morning. He said that he could not leave without thanking us for our gallant conduct; that he was ordered to leave his best troops here, when we first occupied the place, and he believed he had
A. M. Brown (search for this): chapter 97
coquan City, and, turning to the left, surprised the Second and Seventeenth Pennsylvania cavalry, routing them by superior force and advantage of position, capturing nearly one hundred, and killing and wounding over twenty. Some of them took refuge in General Geary's lines, who, ten minutes later, hastily took position in line of battle near the Brentsville road, where it crosses the road from Wolf Run Shoals to Dumfries. General Geary threw out a company of cavalry (the First Maine, Captain Brown) to draw them under his fire. The bait was a good one. In a few minutes, about five hundred of Hampton's Legion charged down the hill upon them, discharging their carbines and yelling like Demons. Our infantry opened and admitted our cavalry, and again closing and presenting a solid front, met the advancing foe with volleys of musketry, and Knapp's Pennsylvania battery greeted them with a storm of shell at the same moment. With the rapidity of lightning they turned and fled in confus
L. W. Bryan (search for this): chapter 97
ee, two of the most promising of the rebel notorieties, and this too with only about eight hundred infantry, three hundred cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. All the officers and men are highly elated with the success, and well they may be. On our side there were three killed and nine wounded, and about thirty taken prisoners. Not a man of our regiment was either killed or wounded, but nine were taken prisoners while on picket. Their names are as follows: Corporal G. B. Light; privates L. W. Bryan, Chidister, and Stokes, company A; privates Blair, Hendershot and Kesocker, company D; privates — Beightler and Constant, company F. Gen. Slocum, commanding Twelfth army corps, came in last evening. He had heard of the attack, and feared that we had been taken prisoners, and so started with a strong force for our relief. He reviewed us this morning. He said that he could not leave without thanking us for our gallant conduct; that he was ordered to leave his best troops here, whe
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 97
Doc. 89.-fight at Dumfries, Va. Philadelphia Inquirer account. Washington, January 1. Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, crossed the Rappahannock, above Burnside's army, on Saturday, the twenty-seventh ult., and advancing between Brentsville and Stafford Court-House, were joined by Hampton's Legion, when they made a combined attack on Dumfries, on the Lower Potomac, at two o'clock the same afternoon. Dumfries was garrisoned by a portion of Gen. Geary's division, consisting of the Fifth, Seventh, and Sixty-sixth Ohio regiments, (of the General's old brigade of veterans,) a section of the Sixth Maine battery and the Twelfth Illinois cavalry, all under command of Colonel Charles Candy. The enemy surprised the outpost pickets and captured about fifty of the First Maryland and Twelfth Illinois cavalry, a portion of which was a patrol. The rebels opened with artillery, shelling our troop
Charles Candy (search for this): chapter 97
xth Ohio regiments, (of the General's old brigade of veterans,) a section of the Sixth Maine battery and the Twelfth Illinois cavalry, all under command of Colonel Charles Candy. The enemy surprised the outpost pickets and captured about fifty of the First Maryland and Twelfth Illinois cavalry, a portion of which was a patrol. a vigorous attack upon the south side of the town, with the idea of frightening and chasing us right out, but it happened that we were not in a driving humor. Col. Candy who commands at this point, ordered the two pieces of artillery that we had into position on a hill in the town, to reply to the rebel guns, and ordered the Fifured on the road to Fredericksburgh. Some of their men were so badly injured that they were obliged to leave them behind, in care of one of their surgeons. Colonel Candy maoeuvred his forces with great skill and tact, meeting and repulsing the enemy at every point. He out-generalled and defeated one of the most brilliant offic
st promising of the rebel notorieties, and this too with only about eight hundred infantry, three hundred cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. All the officers and men are highly elated with the success, and well they may be. On our side there were three killed and nine wounded, and about thirty taken prisoners. Not a man of our regiment was either killed or wounded, but nine were taken prisoners while on picket. Their names are as follows: Corporal G. B. Light; privates L. W. Bryan, Chidister, and Stokes, company A; privates Blair, Hendershot and Kesocker, company D; privates — Beightler and Constant, company F. Gen. Slocum, commanding Twelfth army corps, came in last evening. He had heard of the attack, and feared that we had been taken prisoners, and so started with a strong force for our relief. He reviewed us this morning. He said that he could not leave without thanking us for our gallant conduct; that he was ordered to leave his best troops here, when we first occup
Doc. 89.-fight at Dumfries, Va. Philadelphia Inquirer account. Washington, January 1. Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, crossed the Rappahannock, above Burnside's army, on Saturday, the twenty-seventh ult., and advancing between Brentsville and Stafford Court-House, were joined by Hampton's Legion, when they made a combined attack on Dumfries, on the Lower Potomac, at two o'clock the same afternoon. Dumfries was garrisoned by a portion of Gen. Geary's division, consisting of the Fifth, Seventh, and Sixty-sixth Ohio regiments, (of the General's old brigade of veterans,) a section of the Sixth Maine battery and the Twelfth Illinois cavalry, all under command of Colonel Charles Candy. The enemy surprised the outpost pickets and captured about fifty of the First Maryland and Twelfth Illinois cavalry, a portion of which was a patrol. The rebels opened with artillery, shelling our troo
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