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Dardanelle (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
officers, except Captain Stierlin, stopped near the shore while the latter and his men went through the woods to destroy some wagons, said to be left somewhere by the rebels. At this time a deserter came in from Fort Smith with the information that Hindman had burned a large part of the fort, including all buildings containing confederate stores; also, that he had burned two steamboats and blown up a magazine, and that he had left with his whole command, as was supposed, to a place called Dardanelle. After the above-mentioned command had accomplished its errand, the whole party started back to the ferry-boat; but scarcely had it arrived there, when three mounted butternuts made their appearance on the bank of the river. Not knowing what they wanted, three men of the First Missouri cavalry were ordered to inquire into their wishes, but before they could reach the butternuts they turned, and our men fired upon them with their revolving carbines, which made the rebels run, as usual. B
Prairie Grove (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
contemplated making another attempt to force his way to Missouri, I determined to attack him. Leaving my transportation north of the mountains, I marched from Prairie Grove at eight o'clock yesterday morning, upon this place, a distance of fifty miles. At ten o'clock this morning, my advance came upon two regiments of rebel cavd the experience of the army of the frontier at the last attempt as Arkansas travellers, and at about nine o'clock the whole of the army was on its way home to Prairie Grove battle-field and Cane Hill, etc. The rebels sustained losses by this last dash which cannot be recovered well during the four seasons of 1863, and the Trans It is here well in place to add that after the battle of Prairie Grove, the rebel regiments in their grand skedaddle marched about half the distance between Prairie Grove and Van Buren with white flags. Their fright must have been complete entirely. From citizens of Van Buren I learned the following market prices of articles
Fayetteville, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
ave been killed. During the day's operations the only casualties on our side are five or six men slightly wounded. My long-range guns are now shelling the rebel camp across the river, five miles below this place. If the enemy does not retire during the night, I shall endeavor to cross my troops over the river in the morning, and offer them battle. Respectfully, James G. Blunt, Brigadier-General Commanding. Missouri Democrat account. headquarters, army of the frontier, Fayetteville, Ark., January 3, 1863. Since my last report of the battle of Prairie Grove, another dash has been made by our gallant army of the frontier, which, as I suppose, will be soon again forgotten, like all other efforts for the success of the Flag of our country made by this far-off Western army. In the battle of Prairie Grove, it was principally our artillery and infantry that vindicated their valor as veteran soldiers. The incident of which this is to be but a mere recapitulation, must now
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
t-class boats, and had a splendid outfit. The four boats were valued at about eighty to ninety thousand dollars. The total loss to the confederates on the whole occasion cannot be less than two hundred thousand dollars. While the steamboats were burning, one of the warehouses on the landing caught fire therefrom; it also was entirely consumed. This warehouse had been occupied by the confederates as a storehouse. Thus ended the experience of the army of the frontier at the last attempt as Arkansas travellers, and at about nine o'clock the whole of the army was on its way home to Prairie Grove battle-field and Cane Hill, etc. The rebels sustained losses by this last dash which cannot be recovered well during the four seasons of 1863, and the Trans-Mississippi army of the C. S.A. received a blow which will be stunning to them, and will assist largely in the demoralization of their available forces. The cavalry of the army of the frontier, to whom the whole credit is due, has now pr
Van Buren, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
Doc. 90.-the capture of Van Buren, Ark. Despatch from General Blunt. headquarters, army of frontier, Van Buren, Ark., December 28. To Major-General Curtis: General: The Stars and Stripes now wave in triumph over Van Buren. On learning that Hindman had been reenforced, and contemplated making another attempt to force Van Buren, Ark., December 28. To Major-General Curtis: General: The Stars and Stripes now wave in triumph over Van Buren. On learning that Hindman had been reenforced, and contemplated making another attempt to force his way to Missouri, I determined to attack him. Leaving my transportation north of the mountains, I marched from Prairie Grove at eight o'clock yesterday morning, upon this place, a distance of fifty miles. At ten o'clock this morning, my advance came upon two regiments of rebel cavalry at Dripping Springs, eight miles north of-seventh, each division commenced to move — the First division by way of Cove Creek road, and the Second and Third divisions over the telegraph road, toward Van Buren, Arkansas. The various divisions marched that day toward Lee's Creek and rested there for the night. According to reports, the rebel pickets were but two and a half
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
Doc. 90.-the capture of Van Buren, Ark. Despatch from General Blunt. headquarters, army of frontier, Van Buren, Ark., December 28. To Major-General Curtis: General: The Stars and Stripes now wave in triumph over Van Buren. On learning that Hindman had been reenforced, and contemplated making another attempt to force his way to Missouri, I determined to attack him. Leaving my transportation north of the mountains, I marched from Prairie Grove at eight o'clock yesterday morning, upon this place, a distance of fifty miles. At ten o'clock this morning, my advance came upon two regiments of rebel cavalry at Dripping Springs, eight miles north of the river. Dashing upon them with three thousand cavalry and four mountain howitzers, a brisk running fight took place, which was kept up into the town, resulting in the capture of all their transportation, forty wagons, with six mule-teams, camp and garrison equipage, one hundred prisoners, a large amount of ammunition, four stea
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
by General Blunt and the steamboat captain, who, by the way was a very gentlemanly fellow. The other cavalry, which had gone down under command of Col. Cloud of Kansas, soon secured the other two steamboats, the Key West and Rose Douglass, (one of them being captured by company E, First Missouri volunteer cavalry, Capt. Fuller;)ll along the landing, looking toward Dixie. At about eight o'clock, firing of cannon was heard some distance eastward of Van Buren, and I learned that one of the Kansas batteries was shelling a rebel camp about five or six miles below Van Buren, on the south side of the river. The rebels found this place too hot, and gently withf the Federals that ever made their entrance into Van Buren, you may imagine the surprise of the citizens, who, instead of beholding Pin Indians, Southern tories, Kansas jay-hawkers, hired Dutch cut-throats, and free negroes, saw nothing but well-clad and well-disciplined troops. When the first cavalry entered Van Buren, the wome
Arkansas (United States) (search for this): chapter 98
ployed to the right and left. After a few shots from the howitzers, the cavalry en masse at about twelve o'clock M. made a dash into Van Buren, down-hill. Part of the cavalry went into the city, and some after three stern-wheelboats, which, as was observed from the hill, were making a down-stream skedaddle. These stamboats were loaded principally with corn, and during the downward trip all available hands were engaged in lightening the crafts, by tumbling the corn overboard; the whole Arkansas River, as far as could be seen, was but one floating mass of corn. The hindmost boat, the Frederick Nortrebe, first gave up the contest, by landing about two and a half miles below Van Buren, near the opposite shore, all hands, officers and crew, jumping into the water and wading to the dry land, making their escape into the woods. Before the crew jumped, our men fired into the boat, and landed about twenty shots into the pilot-house and Texas. This firing hastened the speed of the fleeing.
Lee's Creek, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
y way of Cove Creek road, and the Second and Third divisions over the telegraph road, toward Van Buren, Arkansas. The various divisions marched that day toward Lee's Creek and rested there for the night. According to reports, the rebel pickets were but two and a half miles from Lee's Creek, a little back of Oliver's farm, and on Lee's Creek, a little back of Oliver's farm, and on account of the close proximity, each company was allowed but one small fire for cooking purposes principally. Pickets were thrown across the creek, and ordered not to build fires. Here we rested until daybreak of the twenty-eighth of December, when the army was set in motion again. The crossing of Lee's Creek presented a novel sLee's Creek presented a novel sight, especially on the telegraph road crossing, where the Second division (under the gallant commander, Col. Daniel Huston, Jr.) and the Third division (under Gen. Herron) crossed. Frank Leslie's own special artist, or any other of the special artist tribe, could have found an item for the illustrated. The rapidly current and de
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 98
, by tumbling the corn overboard; the whole Arkansas River, as far as could be seen, was but one floating mass of corn. The hindmost boat, the Frederick Nortrebe, first gave up the contest, by landing about two and a half miles below Van Buren, near the opposite shore, all hands, officers and crew, jumping into the water and wading to the dry land, making their escape into the woods. Before the crew jumped, our men fired into the boat, and landed about twenty shots into the pilot-house and Texas. This firing hastened the speed of the fleeing. About this time the most of the cavalry cast of Van Buren, went in pursuit of the other two steamboats, which were then almost rounding the point; only Major Bauzof's command, consisting of company A, First Missouri, and Major McKee's command of the Seventh Missouri volunteer cavalry, remaining opposite the Frederick Nortrebe. After a short time there appeared three persons opposite, one of them carrying a white flag. On our signal, they
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