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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 153
Executions by the rebels.--The Rebel Banner, of the twenty-seventh December, 1862, has the following in a letter from Murfreesboro: Yesterday the sentences of court-martial were executed upon several persons in the vicinity of this place. Gray, resident of this county, was hung as a spy in presence of an immense throng of soldiers and citizens. Proof of guilt was very comprehensive and conclusive. He had been for several months acting in concert with the enemy, and giving them aid and comfort. The gallows was erected near the railroad depot, whither at noon the condemned man was conveyed. He appeared quite unconcerned, and his forbidding features did not display any particular interest in the dread tragedy about to be enacted. Just after the noose had been adjusted about the prisoner's neck, and as Captain Peters was about reading the sentence, Gray leaped from the platform, thus launching himself into eternity. He struggled severely for several minutes, and then expir
was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was coHanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducteHanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave soldier, and distinguished himself at the battle of Shiloh. A soldier of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, sentenced to death, was led to the execution ground; but just as the sentence was about being executed, a courier arrived, bringing a repri
ondemned man was conveyed. He appeared quite unconcerned, and his forbidding features did not display any particular interest in the dread tragedy about to be enacted. Just after the noose had been adjusted about the prisoner's neck, and as Captain Peters was about reading the sentence, Gray leaped from the platform, thus launching himself into eternity. He struggled severely for several minutes, and then expired. At the same hour, amidst a drenching rain-storm, Asa Lewis, member of Captain Page's company, Sixth Kentucky regiment, was shot by a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten
Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 153
y a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave soldier, and distinguished himself at the battle of Shiloh. A soldier of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, sentenced to death, was led to the execution ground; but just as the sentence was about being executed, a courier arrived,
Braxton Bragg (search for this): chapter 153
of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave soldier, and distinguished himself at the battle of Shiloh. A soldier of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, sentenced to death, was led to the execution ground; but just as the sentence was about being executed, a courier arrived, bringing a reprieve from General Bragg. In one of the Alabama regiments, a soldier was executed for desertion.
Executions by the rebels.--The Rebel Banner, of the twenty-seventh December, 1862, has the following in a letter from Murfreesboro: Yesterday the sentences of court-martial were executed upon several persons in the vicinity of this place. Gray, resident of this county, was hung as a spy in presence of an immense throng of soldiers and citizens. Proof of guilt was very comprehensive and conclusive. He had been for several months acting in concert with the enemy, and giving them aid andite unconcerned, and his forbidding features did not display any particular interest in the dread tragedy about to be enacted. Just after the noose had been adjusted about the prisoner's neck, and as Captain Peters was about reading the sentence, Gray leaped from the platform, thus launching himself into eternity. He struggled severely for several minutes, and then expired. At the same hour, amidst a drenching rain-storm, Asa Lewis, member of Captain Page's company, Sixth Kentucky regiment,
George B. Brumley (search for this): chapter 153
shot by a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave soldier, and distinguished himself at the battle of Shiloh. A soldier of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, sentenced to death, was led to the execution ground; but just as the sentence was about being executed, a courier arri
s neck, and as Captain Peters was about reading the sentence, Gray leaped from the platform, thus launching himself into eternity. He struggled severely for several minutes, and then expired. At the same hour, amidst a drenching rain-storm, Asa Lewis, member of Captain Page's company, Sixth Kentucky regiment, was shot by a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regimnd Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave
entucky regiment, was shot by a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigade were drawn up in a hollow square, while Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, with their staffs, were present to witness the execution. The prisoner was conveyed from jail to the brigade drill-ground on an open wagon, under the escort of a file of ten men, commanded by Major Morse and Lieut. George B. Brumley. Lewis's hands were tied behind him, a few words were said to him by Generals Breckinridge and Hanson, the word fire was given, and all was over. The unfortunate man conducted himself with great coolness and composure. He was said to have been a brave soldier, and distinguished himself at the battle of Shiloh. A soldier of the Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, sentenced to death, was led to the execution ground; but just as the sentence was about being e
f soldiers and citizens. Proof of guilt was very comprehensive and conclusive. He had been for several months acting in concert with the enemy, and giving them aid and comfort. The gallows was erected near the railroad depot, whither at noon the condemned man was conveyed. He appeared quite unconcerned, and his forbidding features did not display any particular interest in the dread tragedy about to be enacted. Just after the noose had been adjusted about the prisoner's neck, and as Captain Peters was about reading the sentence, Gray leaped from the platform, thus launching himself into eternity. He struggled severely for several minutes, and then expired. At the same hour, amidst a drenching rain-storm, Asa Lewis, member of Captain Page's company, Sixth Kentucky regiment, was shot by a file of men. He was executed upon a charge of desertion, which was fully proven against him. The scene was one of great. impressiveness and solemnity. The several regiments of Hanson's brigad
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