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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 29 total hits in 11 results.

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The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
April 24th (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
April 30th (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
Cape Fear (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
Beaufort, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
Fort Caswell (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
The rebel steamer Nashville.--A letter from an officer on board the United States steamer Daylight, dated Beaufort, N. C., May second, says: The steamer Nashville ran the blockade on the twenty-fourth of April, and entered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
tered the harbor at Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston T Wilmington by Cape Fear River, (not by the new inlet, as before stated,) and got aground inside of Fort Caswell, having on board sixty thousand stand of arms, and forty tons of powder. They sent steamers from Wilmington and Smithville to lighten her, and succeeded in getting her off on the twenty-sixth, when she proceeded to Smithville, where she took in two lighter-loads of cotton, and ran the blockade out of the harbor on the thirtieth of April, and went to sea. --Boston Traveller, May 12.
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