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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
West-Pointers in the two armies.--From a list before us of the West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of al
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 92
s.--From a list before us of the West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this lconfederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis thUnited States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our governmen himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of all the United States officers.--Mobile Evening News, September 22.
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 92
ier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find iorty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of all the United States officers.--Mobile Evening News, September 22.
est-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of all the United States officers.--Mobile Evening News, September 22.
A. S. Johnson (search for this): chapter 92
West-Pointers in the two armies.--From a list before us of the West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of a
West-Pointers in the two armies.--From a list before us of the West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of al
September 22nd (search for this): chapter 92
West-Point graduates, who are officers in the armies of the United States and confederate States, it appears that there are in the United States army seventeen major-generals and twenty-four brigadier-generals; in the confederate States army, five generals (beside A. S. Johnson, killed at Shiloh,) eighteen major-generals, forty-one brigadier-generals. From this list, which ends with 1848, it appears that we have sixty-four generals from West-Point in our army, while the United States have but forty-one. It was no idle or unmeaning boast of President Davis that he had pick and choice of the officers of the old army. Notwithstanding the frequent flings at West-Pointers, we may yet find it a cause of congratulation that we had at the head of our government one who was educated at West-Point himself, but who, by his service in the army and in the War Department, was so thoroughly acquainted with the military talent of all the United States officers.--Mobile Evening News, September 22.