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four P. M., and bivouacked at five P. M. at Stone Cross-Roads. 2d. Marched at seven A. M., regiment and brigade guarding division-train. Crossed Buckhead Creek, and bivouacked at Buckhead Church, four miles from Millen, the junction of the railroads from Augusta and from Macon for Savannah. 3d. Marched at half-past 12 P. M. Passed near the stockade where thousands of our men (prisoners) had been confined. Crossed the Augusta Railroad, and continued our march until four A. M. of the fourth. 4th. Marched at eight A. M. Crossed Horse Creek at twelve M., and halted until dark, for a bridge to be built across a swamp. Resumed march, crossed the swamp, and bivouacked at seven P. M. 5th. Marched at nine A. M., regiment rear-guard. Crossed Little Horse Creek, marched until nine P. M., and bivouacked in the field. 6th. Marched at half-past 8 A. M. Found the roads much obstructed by trees fallen across them — the work of rebels. Bivouacked in the field at eight P. M. 7
annah, Ga., December 26, 1864. Captain N. K. Bray, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General: I have the honor to submit the following record of events connected with this regiment, transpiring from the occupation of Atlanta, Georgia, September second, 1864, to the occupation of Savannah, Georgia, December twenty-first, 1864: The regiment entered Atlanta the evening of September second, and was posted, September third, on the left of the McDonough road, removing to the right of the road on the fifth, when the regiment went into camp, doing picket, guard, and fatigue-duty on the fortifications, and all duty required of troops at garrison posts; remaining until October sixteenth, when it was ordered out on a forage expedition, under command of Colonel Robinson, commanding First brigade, First division, to the vicinity of Flat Shoals, Georgia; returning and occupying our former camp on the nineteenth, where it remained on duty until the twenty-sixth of the same month, when it was again ord
fairs with the Second brigade having terminated all right. On the twenty-sixth, we again started on an expedition for forage via Decatur. Returned on the twenty-ninth, after having marched about fifty( 50) miles, obtaining an abundant supply of forage. November fifth, pursuant to orders, we struck tents, and at three P. M., formed line and started with the brigade, and marched a little over a mile out of the city on the McDonough road, and encamped for the night, and on the morning of the sixth, marched back to the city and reoccupied our former camps. On the morning of the ninth, a rebel force having attacked our picket-line near the Macon Railroad, we were ordered at once to fall in, and took the double-quick to the outer line of breastworks, when the rebels, after throwing a few shells at us, rapidly fell back, and we quietly returned to camp. Nothing further of importance occurred until the morning of II. Tuesday, November fifteenth, when, in pursuance of orders received p
n started on an expedition for forage via Decatur. Returned on the twenty-ninth, after having marched about fifty( 50) miles, obtaining an abundant supply of forage. November fifth, pursuant to orders, we struck tents, and at three P. M., formed line and started with the brigade, and marched a little over a mile out of the city on the McDonough road, and encamped for the night, and on the morning of the sixth, marched back to the city and reoccupied our former camps. On the morning of the ninth, a rebel force having attacked our picket-line near the Macon Railroad, we were ordered at once to fall in, and took the double-quick to the outer line of breastworks, when the rebels, after throwing a few shells at us, rapidly fell back, and we quietly returned to camp. Nothing further of importance occurred until the morning of II. Tuesday, November fifteenth, when, in pursuance of orders received previously, we formed line at seven A. M., starting at half-past 7 A. M., moved out of th
, Georgia, on the second day of September, 1864; paragraph I. embracing a summary of events while remaining in that city, and paragraph II., a compend, in diary form, of the campaign, commencing on the fifteenth day of November, and. ending on the twenty-first day of December, 1864: I. On the morning of the third of September, the regiment was encamped in the rear of a fort on the right of the Macon turnpike, on the south side of the city, as a support for a battery planted there. On the tenth of same month, David Ireland, Colonel of this regiment, and commanding Third brigade, Second division, Twentieth corps, died of dysentery. On the twelfth, we moved, and were encamped, with the other regiments of the brigade, on a line, this regiment being third in line. While in this camp, brigade dress-parades were held whenever practicable; also, brigade, battalion, company, and squad drills, officers' schools, etc. ; meanwhile furnishing details for picket and fatigue, ranging in number
mber, while engaged in this duty near Davisboro, the regiment was attacked by and became engaged with about two hundred cavalry of the enemy, who were driven from position, and were among the first of the enemy seen since the campaign began. On the thirtieth, after crossing the Ogeechee River, the regiment was assigned to guard and destroy the bridge, which duty was thoroughly performed on the morning of December first. The regiment rejoined the brigade the same day. On the morning of the eleventh, the regiment was assigned to the right of the brigade, and before the day closed, was in line confronting the enemy in front of Savannah. From the first to the eleventh of December, the duty of the regiment has been the usual destruction of public property and the laborious work of crossing Georgia swamps with heavy trains. The position taken by the regiment on the eleventh was retained till the morning of the twenty-first, resulting in the following casualties: Two (2) officers and four
diary form, of the campaign, commencing on the fifteenth day of November, and. ending on the twenty-first day of December, 1864: I. On the morning of the third of September, the regiment was encamped in the rear of a fort on the right of the Macon turnpike, on the south side of the city, as a support for a battery planted there. On the tenth of same month, David Ireland, Colonel of this regiment, and commanding Third brigade, Second division, Twentieth corps, died of dysentery. On the twelfth, we moved, and were encamped, with the other regiments of the brigade, on a line, this regiment being third in line. While in this camp, brigade dress-parades were held whenever practicable; also, brigade, battalion, company, and squad drills, officers' schools, etc. ; meanwhile furnishing details for picket and fatigue, ranging in number from forty (40) to seventy-five (75) men daily. On the twenty-fifth, were reviewed by Major-General Slocum, General Sherman being present. On the twent
pany, and squad drills, officers' schools, etc. ; meanwhile furnishing details for picket and fatigue, ranging in number from forty (40) to seventy-five (75) men daily. On the twenty-fifth, were reviewed by Major-General Slocum, General Sherman being present. On the twenty-ninth of September, also on the first of October, we took part in division-drills, conducted by Brigadier-General Geary. October tenth, started on a foraging expedition, which proved highly successful; returning on the thirteenth, having marched about forty (40) miles. On the nineteenth, in company with the brigade, we embarked on a train for East-Point; after reaching which place, we marched about two miles on the West-Point Railroad, where we stood guard while the track was torn up by a negro gang, the iron being loaded on the train to be sent to repair the track on the Chattanooga Railroad near Resaca. On the two following days, were employed similarly taking up the iron also on the Macon road, four (4) miles
the usual routine of duties appertaining to camp life. October 11.--The regiment and brigade went on a foraging expedition to Flat Rock, and returned on the fourteenth, with train loaded with forage. 19th, 21st, 22d. The regiment guarded railroad-train and were engaged in tearing up rails on East-Point Railroad to and from and thirteen, which was increased to five hundred and thirty-two on the fifth by an addition caused by a consolidation with the Twenty-seventh Indiana. On the fourteenth, we left the Chattahoochee River, reaching Atlanta the same day. On the fifteenth, the time of moving from Atlanta, there were nine animals in my possession,pied, in pursuance to orders, with the remainder of the brigade, in constructing quarters and occupying works for defence, south of the city of Atlanta. On the fourteenth, under orders received from the division commander, the regiment proceeded to Chattanooga as an escort to paymasters, awaiting an opportunity to pay the army.
ks of it. Were ordered out at one o'clock in the night, to charge the enemy's works, but the order was countermanded, and the troops returned to our own works. Regiment remained in the works until the fifteenth, without any casualties. On the fifteenth, Ezra Hall, of company H, was wounded by a piece of shell. This was the first and only man wounded during the campaign. Regiment remained in our works, picketing our own front, and under an almost incessant fire of shell from the rebel batternd thirteen, which was increased to five hundred and thirty-two on the fifth by an addition caused by a consolidation with the Twenty-seventh Indiana. On the fourteenth, we left the Chattahoochee River, reaching Atlanta the same day. On the fifteenth, the time of moving from Atlanta, there were nine animals in my possession, for which, in the fifteen days previous, there had been drawn only three days rations, as the twelve days rations were foraged from the neighboring regions. Thirteen a
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