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Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
Doc. 12.-expedition up White River. Report of Colonel Andrews. headquarters post of Little Rock, Saturday evening, April 2, 1864. General: In compliance with General Orders No. 169, War Department, October twenty-seventh, 1862, I have the honor to report the result of an engagement at Fitzhugh's woods, six miles abovet half-past 4 o'clock P. M., I received orders from Brigadier-General Kimball to proceed on an expedition up White River. At seven o'clock that evening, I left Little Rock with a detachment of the Third regiment Minnesota volunteer infantry, (veterans,) Major E. W. Foster commanding, consisting of companies B, C, E, G, H, and I, nst shows what a resource there is in courage, and what power there is in discipline. The place to which we marched, is one hundred and sixty-eight miles from Little Rock, and we made the expedition and returned to this place, and had resumed our ordinary duties here inside of three days. I am obliged to the Quartermaster's de
Jackson County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
The gunboat Covington proceeded with us by the mutual wish of the captain of the transport and of Lieutenant G. P. Lord, commanding the gunboat. After getting some distance up the river, we took the precaution to bring on board and detain any persons lurking about the shore whom we suspected would carry intelligence into the country of our approach; and in this way I gained more or less valuable information, and also the services of a good guide. We arrived at Gregory's Landing, Jackson County, at dusk, and having learned that one of the camps of McCrae's men was four miles back of that landing, on Straight Lake, I ventured to move out there to surprise it. The evening was rainy and extremely dark, but my guides knew the road perfectly, and my patrols moved forward so carefully, there could be no possibility of an ambush. Three miles from the river was a bayou (Cache) difficult even for cavalry to ford, but the detachment of cavalry crossed it without accident, and suddenly s
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
d private William F. Ingham, company B.; Corporal Lewis Kimball, and privates James B. Chapin, Henry W. Wallace, and Orin Case, company C; Corporals Isaac Laurer and Albert G. Leach, company E; private Albert R. Pierce, company G; privates Rollin 0. Crawford and John Eaton, company H; privates Joseph Markling and Andrew Clark, company I; Quartermaster Sergeant Herman D. Pettibone. Seven killed, four wounded and missing, sixteen wounded. Total casualties, twenty-seven. Eighth cavalry, Missouri volunteers: John E. Mode, company I, killed;----Buckner, company I, missing. Total killed, eight; wounded and missing, five; wounded, sixteen; whole loss, twenty-nine. A few men were left as a guard on the transport, and some were used in guarding prisoners; so that the whole number of men I had engaged was only one hundred and eighty. The moral effect of this combat is greatly on our side, showing as it does, that, with a very small force we are able to defy the combined numbers of
White River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
Doc. 12.-expedition up White River. Report of Colonel Andrews. headquarters post of Little Rock, Saturday evening, April 2, 1864. General: In compliance with General Orders No. 169, War Department, October twenty-seventh, 1862, I have the honor to report the result of an engagement at Fitzhugh's woods, six miles above Augusta, on White River, with the forces under Brigadier-General McCrae. On Wednesday afternoon last, March thirtieth, at half-past 4 o'clock P. M., I received orders from Brigadier-General Kimball to proceed on an expedition up White River. At seven o'clock that evening, I left Little Rock with a detachment of the Third regimWhite River. At seven o'clock that evening, I left Little Rock with a detachment of the Third regiment Minnesota volunteer infantry, (veterans,) Major E. W. Foster commanding, consisting of companies B, C, E, G, H, and I, numbering one hundred and eighty-six, and proceeded to Duvall's Bluff by railroad. We reached there at twenty minutes past four the next morning, and found the steamer Dove, Captain Erwin, in readiness to move
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
sult of an engagement at Fitzhugh's woods, six miles above Augusta, on White River, with the forces under Brigadier-General Mive o'clock next morning, and the transport moved on up to Augusta. At five o'clock, therefore, yesterday morning, (April first,) we landed at Augusta, a small but pleasantly situated village, and immediately had it surrounded by pickets, and had cisonport road. It was about six o'clock when we moved from Augusta. We had scarcely got a mile and a half out of town when oflankers and patrols. At the bayou, some six miles from Augusta, our advanced-guard came upon a small party of mounted menof them, however, being poorly armed; and I had learned at Augusta that he had from four hundred to six hundred men near Antoem. After, therefore, reaching a point twelve miles above Augusta, and meeting no force, I determined to return to the transut he did not venture near us again; and we proceeded into Augusta in perfect order, our colors flying, and the men singing,
Jacksonport (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
his forces had been concentrating, that two. or three days previously they had moved toward Jacksonport, that they had returned, and that the principal camp was at Antony's, said to be seven miles distant on the Jacksonport road. I then ordered my small command to land, leaving a guard on board the transport, and proceeded up the Jacksonport road. It was about six o'clock when we moved from Jacksonport road. It was about six o'clock when we moved from Augusta. We had scarcely got a mile and a half out of town when our advanced-guard encountered a small party of the enemy, and pursued and charged them two miles, and captured two prisoners. Comingd drove it into the woods on a road leading to the right. We then continued the march on the Jacksonport road, keeping out for some distance flankers and patrols. At the bayou, some six miles frotachment to pursue at their utmost speed, which was done. It appeared that he turned off the Jacksonport road toward McCoy's, one of his places of resort, to which place Captain Matthews pursued him
Cache, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 73
or less valuable information, and also the services of a good guide. We arrived at Gregory's Landing, Jackson County, at dusk, and having learned that one of the camps of McCrae's men was four miles back of that landing, on Straight Lake, I ventured to move out there to surprise it. The evening was rainy and extremely dark, but my guides knew the road perfectly, and my patrols moved forward so carefully, there could be no possibility of an ambush. Three miles from the river was a bayou (Cache) difficult even for cavalry to ford, but the detachment of cavalry crossed it without accident, and suddenly surrounded the farm-house near by, and as quickly threw out pickets. The information received, however, was that the camp had been abandoned early that morning. The cavalry then recrossed the bayou, and we returned to the transport, arriving on board at ten o'clock. I gave orders for my command to have breakfast by five o'clock next morning, and the transport moved on up to Augus
ent at Fitzhugh's woods, six miles above Augusta, on White River, with the forces under Brigadier-General McCrae. On Wednesday afternoon last, March thirtieth, at half-past 4 o'clock P. M., I receirived at Gregory's Landing, Jackson County, at dusk, and having learned that one of the camps of McCrae's men was four miles back of that landing, on Straight Lake, I ventured to move out there to sur citizens and colored men brought on board, that I might ascertain the number and whereabouts of McCrae's forces. I learned that for a few days past his forces had been concentrating, that two. or tot being fired at them, turned and fled. At the next farm-house we reached, we learned that General McCrae was one of the party. This fact I discovered very soon, and immediately ordered the cavalryalso gained some information at almost every farm-house concerning the movements and locality of McCrae's forces. I had heard his forces estimated variously at from five hundred to one thousand five
Lewis Kimball (search for this): chapter 73
result of an engagement at Fitzhugh's woods, six miles above Augusta, on White River, with the forces under Brigadier-General McCrae. On Wednesday afternoon last, March thirtieth, at half-past 4 o'clock P. M., I received orders from Brigadier-General Kimball to proceed on an expedition up White River. At seven o'clock that evening, I left Little Rock with a detachment of the Third regiment Minnesota volunteer infantry, (veterans,) Major E. W. Foster commanding, consisting of companies B, CBrewer and William Shearer, company B; private Andrew Brigham, company G; private John Pope, company I. Wounded: Sergeant Albert G. Hunt, First Sergeant Henry Durant, Corporal Edward Frygang, and private William F. Ingham, company B.; Corporal Lewis Kimball, and privates James B. Chapin, Henry W. Wallace, and Orin Case, company C; Corporals Isaac Laurer and Albert G. Leach, company E; private Albert R. Pierce, company G; privates Rollin 0. Crawford and John Eaton, company H; privates Joseph
E. W. Foster (search for this): chapter 73
o'clock P. M., I received orders from Brigadier-General Kimball to proceed on an expedition up White River. At seven o'clock that evening, I left Little Rock with a detachment of the Third regiment Minnesota volunteer infantry, (veterans,) Major E. W. Foster commanding, consisting of companies B, C, E, G, H, and I, numbering one hundred and eighty-six, and proceeded to Duvall's Bluff by railroad. We reached there at twenty minutes past four the next morning, and found the steamer Dove, Captaine enemy to do us an injury there, I caused a line of sharp-shooters to be deployed, concealed on both flanks of the crossing of the bayou in the woods, to protect our crossing whenever we might choose to move. This was promptly attended to by Major Foster. Although the ford of the bayou is about one hundred and twenty-five yards wide, and extremely difficult to cross in the vicinity of an enemy, we made the passage without any interference or obstacle, which is further evidence that he had bee
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