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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
Doc. 14.-operations in South-Carolina. Defence of General Benham. see the reduction of Fort Pulaski, Vol. IV. rebellion record. after the fall of Fort Pulaski, in April, 1862, for the rest of the month it appeared impossible to effect any thing against the enemy with the few troops then available in this district, stretching along nearly two hundred miles of coast, from St. Augustine, Florida, to North-Edisto River, South-Carolina. These troops did not consist of more than about fifteen thousand effective men. At the close of April, the barge crew of General Ripley escaped from Charleston and were brought to Port Royal. They represented the troops and defences of Charleston to be very weak, comprising not more than five or six thousand men altogether, and those for a large portion raw troops or boys; so that General Benham then conceived a plan for attacking that city, which was at once informally laid before General Hunter, Commodore Du Pont, and others, and appear
North Edisto River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
l, 1862, for the rest of the month it appeared impossible to effect any thing against the enemy with the few troops then available in this district, stretching along nearly two hundred miles of coast, from St. Augustine, Florida, to North-Edisto River, South-Carolina. These troops did not consist of more than about fifteen thousand effective men. At the close of April, the barge crew of General Ripley escaped from Charleston and were brought to Port Royal. They represented the troops and or attacking that city, which was at once informally laid before General Hunter, Commodore Du Pont, and others, and appeared to meet their cordial concurrence. This plan was to add to the force of some three thousand five hundred men, then at North-Edisto, by a well-concerted and simultaneous movement of our steamers, all the other disposable force in the district, to make some ten thousand in all; and by rapidly ferrying them across the North-Edisto River, to John's and Wadnelow Island, to mar
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
s, was intended to move thence by one night's march, (some twelve to fifteen miles,) on the east side of Bohickee Creek, across John's Island to Legareville, and there meet the balance of the available force, (all that there were vessels to move at once,) which was to arrive at the Stono by starting some twenty-four hours after the orders to move had been sent to General Wright. It being a part of General Benham's plan to divert the attention of the enemy, and obstruct the railroad between Savannah and Charleston, he had previously arranged with General Stevens for this. Stevens stated that it could be done at any time when ordered. This was ordered on the twenty-ninth, and although General Stevens sent out about eight hundred infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery, to cut the railroad about fifteen miles above Beaufort, from the Salkehatchie to the Coosahatchie Rivers, the whole movement proved a miserable failure, without cooperation of the different arms; an
St. Augustine (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
Doc. 14.-operations in South-Carolina. Defence of General Benham. see the reduction of Fort Pulaski, Vol. IV. rebellion record. after the fall of Fort Pulaski, in April, 1862, for the rest of the month it appeared impossible to effect any thing against the enemy with the few troops then available in this district, stretching along nearly two hundred miles of coast, from St. Augustine, Florida, to North-Edisto River, South-Carolina. These troops did not consist of more than about fifteen thousand effective men. At the close of April, the barge crew of General Ripley escaped from Charleston and were brought to Port Royal. They represented the troops and defences of Charleston to be very weak, comprising not more than five or six thousand men altogether, and those for a large portion raw troops or boys; so that General Benham then conceived a plan for attacking that city, which was at once informally laid before General Hunter, Commodore Du Pont, and others, and appear
Legareville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ence by one night's march, (some twelve to fifteen miles,) on the east side of Bohickee Creek, across John's Island to Legareville, and there meet the balance of the available force, (all that there were vessels to move at once,) which was to arrivet noon of the second, a steamer came out with a letter from General Wright, saying that he expected to be coming in to Legareville, on the Stono, soon after light on the following morning. The troops on the transports continued on to the Stono, and or eight men were killed and wounded. During this skirmish General Benham placed some two hundred and fifty men at Legareville to protect the buildings for Wright's column from their destruction, as feared by the rebels; instructing the officers column of General Wright, nearly six thousand strong, did not make its appearance, and only began to come slowly into Legareville on the afternoon of Thursday, the fifth, delayed by broken bridges and other impediments, and so worn out by marches i
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
after the fall of Fort Pulaski, in April, 1862, for the rest of the month it appeared impossible to effect any thing against the enemy with the few troops then available in this district, stretching along nearly two hundred miles of coast, from St. Augustine, Florida, to North-Edisto River, South-Carolina. These troops did not consist of more than about fifteen thousand effective men. At the close of April, the barge crew of General Ripley escaped from Charleston and were brought to Port Royal. They represented the troops and defences of Charleston to be very weak, comprising not more than five or six thousand men altogether, and those for a large portion raw troops or boys; so that General Benham then conceived a plan for attacking that city, which was at once informally laid before General Hunter, Commodore Du Pont, and others, and appeared to meet their cordial concurrence. This plan was to add to the force of some three thousand five hundred men, then at North-Edisto, by a
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
ning the river to our gunboats, to dash across the lower part of James Island to Fort Johnson, from which point or from Lanton's Place, one orake preparations for carrying out his plan for the occupation of James Island. But he directed him, at the same time, to inform the junior Geng to seize Morris Island, or simply holding the firm landing on James Island for future use against Charleston. The rear column of the expedhips from Hilton Head arrived, and the troops were discharged on James Island on Tuesday, and another skirmish occurred in which we lost twentlearned on the next day that three thousand men could have swept James Island to Fort Johnson, still the column of General Wright, nearly six ding would be untenable; and as there was not dry land enough on James Island for the encampment of our troops, out of the range of this batteylight; and that by the consequent withdrawal of the troops from James Island by General Hunter, we have given up the only sure hold we had up
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
could be done at any time when ordered. This was ordered on the twenty-ninth, and although General Stevens sent out about eight hundred infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and two pieces of artillery, to cut the railroad about fifteen miles above Beaufort, from the Salkehatchie to the Coosahatchie Rivers, the whole movement proved a miserable failure, without cooperation of the different arms; and after being kept at bay for two or three hours, as the rebel accounts state, (and we have no knowledge to the contrary,) by ninety cavalry only, the expedition returned to Beaufort without having effected any thing, though it approached, as was stated, within one fourth of a mile of the railroad. At length, on May thirty-first, General Hunter authorized the starting of the expedition with the object of entering the Stono, and then acting as might seem best under the circumstances ; either by moving toward Fort Johnson, attempting to seize Morris Island, or simply holding the firm landing on
Edisto (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
neous movement of our steamers, all the other disposable force in the district, to make some ten thousand in all; and by rapidly ferrying them across the North-Edisto River, to John's and Wadnelow Island, to march them in two columns, one on each side the Bohickee Creek to the dry landings at the Grimballs on either side of the Stgh at first he told General Benham to get ready for it. But when General Benham proposed to send, as part of the preparation, the cavalry and artillery horses to Edisto, (the great cause of delay at any time,) General Hunter would not consent to it, and the proposition was still left in abeyance, with this obstacle existing wheneharleston. The rear column of the expedition with one field-battery and over three thousand men, except some thirteen companies in the present sent by mistake to Edisto, left Hilton Head on the morning of the second of June, General Wright's orders having been duly despatched to him the previous day. As the flag-boat, with Gen
John's Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 76
secrecy from the pickets of the enemy within rifle range opposite; precautions ordered by General Benham, and which effectually concealed the massing of these troops, horses, and guns, at the Edisto, up to the latest moment, as was eventually shown. This force which General Wright had stated he expected to be able to ferry across the Edisto in twenty-four hours, was intended to move thence by one night's march, (some twelve to fifteen miles,) on the east side of Bohickee Creek, across John's Island to Legareville, and there meet the balance of the available force, (all that there were vessels to move at once,) which was to arrive at the Stono by starting some twenty-four hours after the orders to move had been sent to General Wright. It being a part of General Benham's plan to divert the attention of the enemy, and obstruct the railroad between Savannah and Charleston, he had previously arranged with General Stevens for this. Stevens stated that it could be done at any time when
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