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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
boat Bombshell, with four rifled guns, and a large supply of ammunition, was captured, with all her officers and crew, and the Albemarle, which was on her way to New-Bern to form a junction with the rebel force, then moving upon that city, was beaten with her own weapons, and driven back with her guns disabled, her hull terribly sh difficulty kept afloat. So confident were the rebels of the ability of this invulnerable iron-clad to reach her rendezvous, that General Palmer, commanding at New-Bern, was summoned to surrender, and informed that the river and sound were blockaded below, and his communications cut off. The Albemarle did not come to time; but, she kept up a retreating fire, she hastened to regain the protecting harbor of Plymouth, leaving us the undisputed control of the sound, and by her defeat saving New-Bern, and doubtless the Department of South-Carolina, from being lost to our Government. double-Ender. Another account. United States gunboat Miami, off mout
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
Doc. 19.-fight in Albemarle Sound, N. C. A national account. Hatteras inlet, N. C., May 18, 1864. I venture to submit the following account of one of the most unusual and remarkable naval conflicts of this or any other war, in which the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed the repeated broads
Roanoke (United States) (search for this): chapter 81
rnoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with oubtless the Department of South-Carolina, from being lost to our Government. double-Ender. Another account. United States gunboat Miami, off mouth of Roanoke River, May 6. We have just passed through the second engagement with that ugly little ram, the Albemarle. Yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock, the ram, consorteding the night the ram got away up the river. We all think that two hours more of daylight would have made her ours. The fleet is now lying at the mouth of the Roanoke, waiting for the ram to come out again; but I think she had such a shaking as she did not expect, and will be very careful how she pokes her nose in such a mess a
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 81
ost impetuous and unexpected manner, was forced by an inferior antagonist to beat a precipitate retreat, which he commenced the very moment that he escaped the grasp of the Sassacus. And, although she kept up a retreating fire, she hastened to regain the protecting harbor of Plymouth, leaving us the undisputed control of the sound, and by her defeat saving New-Bern, and doubtless the Department of South-Carolina, from being lost to our Government. double-Ender. Another account. United States gunboat Miami, off mouth of Roanoke River, May 6. We have just passed through the second engagement with that ugly little ram, the Albemarle. Yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock, the ram, consorted by the steamer Cotton Planter and the Bombshell, which last they sunk at the attack on Plymouth and afterward raised, made its appearance at the mouth of the river. We retreated slowly, and they followed. Captain French sent the steamer Massassoit ahead to inform the remainder of the fle
Decatur (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duvisions still stood at their guns, and our brave commander firmly enunciating his instructions and orders, and guiding every movement of his gallant ship with a coolness, precision, and relentless audacity that find no parallel since the days of Decatur and Bainbridge — those days of splendid gallantry and magnificent courage — calmly smoking his cigar through the whole eventful conflict, and displaying a perfect indifference to danger, worthy of one of Farragut's salamanders, kept his guns at
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
am Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed tthe mouth of the river to decoy the ram from under the protective batteries of Plymouth into the open waters of the Sound, and falling back before her into a favorabl the white stern-wheel steamer turned short round, and put back hastily toward Plymouth, being, as we afterward learned, the Cotton Plant river steamer, cotton-clad, mer, which proved to be the Bombshell, captured from the army by the rebels at Plymouth, and now used against us, closed up on the ram's quarter, in position for the she kept up a retreating fire, she hastened to regain the protecting harbor of Plymouth, leaving us the undisputed control of the sound, and by her defeat saving New-teamer Cotton Planter and the Bombshell, which last they sunk at the attack on Plymouth and afterward raised, made its appearance at the mouth of the river. We retre
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 81
Doc. 19.-fight in Albemarle Sound, N. C. A national account. Hatteras inlet, N. C., May 18, 1864. I venture to submit the following account of one of the most unusual and remarkable naval conflicts of this or any other war, in which the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed the repeated broads
Bainbridge (search for this): chapter 81
her casemate on our approach, now lay draggled and torn, with its shattered flag-staff, on her deck ; and turning our vessel around with hard-a-port helm, which she answered slowly but steadily, we again passed down by our enemy. Our divisions still stood at their guns, and our brave commander firmly enunciating his instructions and orders, and guiding every movement of his gallant ship with a coolness, precision, and relentless audacity that find no parallel since the days of Decatur and Bainbridge — those days of splendid gallantry and magnificent courage — calmly smoking his cigar through the whole eventful conflict, and displaying a perfect indifference to danger, worthy of one of Farragut's salamanders, kept his guns at work on our retiring foe, so long as they could be brought to bear, till the Sassacus was carried by her disabled engine slowly, gracefully, and defiantly out of range. Thus ended the single-handed encounter between the Sassacus — a delicate river steamer — an
John Paul Jones (search for this): chapter 81
fight in Albemarle Sound, N. C. A national account. Hatteras inlet, N. C., May 18, 1864. I venture to submit the following account of one of the most unusual and remarkable naval conflicts of this or any other war, in which the contending forces were so markedly disproportionate, and the result so contrary to preconceived ideas of iron-clad invincibility, that it may justly claim to take a historical position on the same page that records the brilliant exploits of Decatur and John Paul Jones. On the afternoon of May fifth, the Mattabesett, Sassacus, and Wyalusing, side-wheel gunboats, were lying at anchor in Albemarle Sound, twenty miles below the mouth of the Roanoke River, having been assigned the arduous duty of encountering, and, if possible, destroying the rebel iron-clad ram Albemarle, whose recent raid, in conjunction with the attack and capture of Plymouth, when she succeeded in capturing two of our gunboats, and sustained unharmed the repeated broadsides of the
S. G. French (search for this): chapter 81
being lost to our Government. double-Ender. Another account. United States gunboat Miami, off mouth of Roanoke River, May 6. We have just passed through the second engagement with that ugly little ram, the Albemarle. Yesterday afternoon, at two o'clock, the ram, consorted by the steamer Cotton Planter and the Bombshell, which last they sunk at the attack on Plymouth and afterward raised, made its appearance at the mouth of the river. We retreated slowly, and they followed. Captain French sent the steamer Massassoit ahead to inform the remainder of the fleet. At four o'clock they came in sight, running up at full speed. When the rebel fleet saw our reenforcements they tried to back out; but it was no go, as some of our vessels can steam eighteen knots, while the ram can make but eight or nine. At half-past 4 we fired the first gun — our one hundred pounder rifle. That was the signal for the commencement of a most furious cannonading, which lasted over three hours. T
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