hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 901 143 Browse Search
T. J. Jackson 874 6 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 810 42 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 588 6 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 529 95 Browse Search
James Longstreet 468 2 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 465 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 428 0 Browse Search
J. R. Trimble 377 3 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 310 68 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 9,897 total hits in 1,967 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
pany, of the same regiment, advanced in open space, discovered that the forces meeting us in front from the left were those of Major-General Jackson, and entered into communication with them so as to avoid the risk of further mischief. In the mean time, two companies of the Twelfth regiment, (Miller's and Neville's,) sent out under Lieutenant-Colonel Cadwallader Jones, to meet the enemy seen on the left, took and brought in some twelve of the prisoners, belonging in chief to regiments of Pennsylvania reserves. At the intersection of the roads, near Walnut Grove Church, where Major-General Hill stopped to confer with Major-General Jackson, I received General Hill's further instructions, and resumed the advance on the roads running near the Chickahominy to Gaines's Mill. Approaching the vicinity of Hogan's house, where General Lee stopped me by the roadside and gave me further directions for advancing and attacking the enemy, I moved the brigade forward in nearly the same order as the
Anderson's Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
a half, sending, as directed, Lieutenant Grattan, with six men, up to Beaver Dam Station, to ascertain the extent of damage done the railroad, and the position and strength of the enemy's forces at that point. During the night a courier arrived from Lieutenant Grattan, stating that but little injury was done the road, and the enemy had returned, and that the necessary repairs could have been made in a few hours. I started early next morning with the command, and proceeded as far as Anderson's Station, where I halted to feed. I there found a cavalry company encamped, from Bath County, commanded by Captain McChestney, who informed me that he was picketing the Telegraph road, leading to Fredericksburg, and scouting in that direction. I then sent a Lieutenant and nine men from Major Critcher's battalion, down the road, with Captain McChestney's picket, to go in the direction of Bowling Green, by a road running parallel with the Telegraph road, and leading to that place. I then pro
Chesterfield (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
Casualties in the Third Division, Army Valley District, Major-General R. S. Ewell commanding, in the Actions near Richmond, June 27 to July 1, 1862. killed.wounded.missing.total.Aggregate. Officers.N. C. Officers and Privates.Officers.N. C. Officers and Privates.Officers.N. C. Officers and Privates.Officers.N. C. Officers and Privates. 2315958695 5281906987 Official: G. Campbell Brown, A. A. General. General Huger's Report. Headquarters of division, falling Creek, Chesterfield County, July 21, 1862. General B. E. Lee, commanding Army Northern Virginia: General: I submit, herewith, the reports of different commanders in this division, showing the part taken by the troops under their command, in the battles near Richmond, between the twenty-fifth of June and the first of July, 1862: Immediately after the battle of Seven Pines, my division was posted in the advance, opposite that position of the enemy from which our troops retired on the morning of June second.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
enth Louisiana, wounded. Lieutenant Benning, Georgia regulars, reported to General Semmes on the fast reserve, General J. R. Anderson, with his Georgia brigade, was directed to advance cautiously, re, waved his sword and cried out--Hurrah for Georgia! To this there was a cheering response from ded. I would add that the Troup artillery (Georgia legion) were with my brigade during all of it Jackson, of Virginia, and Charles Daniel, of Georgia, volunteer Aids, for gallantry and distinguisr a brigade commanded by Colonel Anderson, of Georgia, and requested him to support me in the chargt; also-- Report A, Colonel T. R. R. Cobb, Georgia legion cavalry. Report B, Colonel L. S. Ba sent forward, to clear the road, company F, (Georgia Huzzars, Captain Waring,) of the legion. Ther, with private Volney Metcalf, of company A, Georgia legion, I succeeded in getting to the rear of line on my right, and ordered me to put some Georgia regiments, of Brigadier-General Lawton's comm
Roland's Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
e road, by Nance's shop, and thence across toward Charles City Court-House, so as to extend my left, and keep a lookout toward Forge Bridge, by which I was liable to be attacked in flank and rear by Stoneman, should he endeavor to form a junction with McClellan. I found Evelington's Heights easily gained. A squadron in possession vacated without much hesitation, retreating up the road, the only road by which it could reach Westover, owing to the impassability of Herring's Creek below Roland's Mill. Colonel Martin was sent around farther to the left, and the howitzer brought into action in the River road, to fire upon the enemy's camp below. Judging from the great commotion and excitement caused below, it must have had considerable effect. We soon had prisoners from various corps and divisions, and from their statements, as well as those of citizens, I learned that the enemy's main body was there; but much reduced and demoralized. I kept the commanding General apprised of my
Old Cold Harbor (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
-General commanding, but in moving forward in person, communicated with him myself, and under his orders, moved forward, in line of battle, to the support of General Garland, in a contemplated attack upon the enemy's batteries to the left of Old Cold Harbor. Before the attack was made, however, the position of both Garland's brigade and mine was changed, both brigades being wheeled on Garland's left to the rear. We were then ordered forward by Major-General Jackson, to attack the enemy in froht, and my pickets on that road were not disturbed during the night. The next morning General Jackson moved directly across Beaver Dam. I took a circuitous route to turn that stream, turning down first the Old Church road, (both aiming for Old Cold Harbor,) and directing my march so as to cover his left flank, he having formed, at Beaver Dam, a junction with the divisions which marched by the way of Mechanicsville. All day we were skirmishing with, killing and capturing, small detachments of
Walkerton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
remained until the tenth instant; when, in obedience to an order from General Lee, I moved with my command in the direction of Norman's Ferry, with a view of intercepting a party of the enemy's cavalry, reported to be crossing the Mattapony at Walkerton. Learning, however, that night, from Dr. Walker, who had conveyed to General Lee the intelligence of this supposed move of the enemy, that he had retired in the direction of, and most probably to, Gloucester Point, I returned, on the next day,r to the enemy runaway slaves, and also arrested and brought up two conscripts. Having done all that I could at the time, I took up the line of march on my return on the twenty-sixth of July. Marching by easy stages, and lying over one day at Walkerton, in King and Queen County, for the purpose of resting the horses, I arrived and reported to you on the thirtieth of July. It only remains for me to add that the hospitality of the citizens all along the road was unprecedented. There are in
Green Bay (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
tion of Bowling Green, by a road running parallel with the Telegraph road, and leading to that place. I then proceeded on to Beaver Dam, and found the road had been repaired, ready for the passage of trains. I halted my command to ascertain something of the condition of the road above, about three miles, at a place called Green Bay's crossing, and found that there was likewise but little injury done the road at that point, but deemed it important to have three roads guarded, leading to Green Bay and Frederick Hall, so that the trains might pass uninterruptedly, or be notified in time to prevent accident. I therefore sent Lieutenant Coyner, with eleven men, in charge of the post, and proceeded with the remainder of my command across Anderson's Bridge, and down the road leading toward Fredericksburg, in search of the enemy and information. I followed this road to a point where it intersected the Telegraph road and Dr. Flippo's house, when I came upon a party of seven of the enem
Port Republic (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
first instant. Company B. Sergeant John Ford, wounded, on the twenty-seventh ultimo; Michael Tool, wounded, on the first instant. Company H. M. R. Hanger, wounded, on the twenty-seventh ultimo; N. D. McClure, killed, on the first instant. Respectfully, G. C. Smith, Captain, commanding Twenty-seventh Regiment Virginia Volunteers. Report of Captain Wooding. camp near Gordonsville, Virginia, July 24, 1862. Brigadier-General Taliaferro: General: My battery marched from Port Republic to the fortifications of the enemy near Richmond, with the Third brigade, commanded, in your absence, by Colonel Fulkerson. On Friday, the twenty-seventh June, we arrived to within a short distance of the battle-field at Gaines's Mill, about four o'clock P. M. Soon afterward the infantry were ordered to leave the road, and advance by a narrow path through the woods in the direction whence the firing proceeded. Colonel Fulkerson ordered me to remain where I was, and, if needed, he wou
Beaver Dam Station (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 86
July 31, 1862. General: In obedience to your written order, I report, in writing, the late demonstration and attack of the enemy at Verdon and vicinity: Agreeably to your instructions, I left Atlee's Station, on Sunday, the twentieth instant, in charge of a squadron, and proceeded in the direction of Hanover Junction, (via Hanover Court-House,) which place I reached about dusk and encamped beyond, some mile and a half, sending, as directed, Lieutenant Grattan, with six men, up to Beaver Dam Station, to ascertain the extent of damage done the railroad, and the position and strength of the enemy's forces at that point. During the night a courier arrived from Lieutenant Grattan, stating that but little injury was done the road, and the enemy had returned, and that the necessary repairs could have been made in a few hours. I started early next morning with the command, and proceeded as far as Anderson's Station, where I halted to feed. I there found a cavalry company encamped, f
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...