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reenforcements should arrive there, Ewell's, Hill's, and Jackson's divisions were moved, on the seventh, in the direction of the enemy, from their respective encampments near Gordonsville. On the mo near Culpeper Court-House, I directed Generals Ewell and Hill to leave their encampment on the seventh, and, at dawn on the following morning, to resume the march, and move via Barnett's Ford. The sions were such that I did not require General Hill's division to follow General Ewell's on the seventh; but I did expect it to do so on the eighth; and such would have been the case, had General Hill carried out the instructions which I gave him before he left his encampment on the seventh, to move at dawn on the morning of the eighth. Ewell moved early in the morning, and though he did not crttle of Cedar Run, on the ninth of August, 1862: About five o'clock P. M., Thursday, the seventh instant, this regiment, with the balance of the brigade, and in rear of the brigade, marched in the
's, and Jackson's divisions were moved, on the seventh, in the direction of the enemy, from their respective encampments near Gordonsville. On the morning of the eighth, the enemy's cavalry, north of the Rapidan, was driven back by ours, under Brigadier-General Robertson. Our cavalry pursued the enemy's on the direct road from Bitions of the two divisions were such that I did not require General Hill's division to follow General Ewell's on the seventh; but I did expect it to do so on the eighth; and such would have been the case, had General Hill carried out the instructions which I gave him before he left his encampment on the seventh, to move at dawn ord G. Lee, the Twenty-seventh by Captain Charles L. Haynes. Captains Carpenter's and Poague's batteries are attached. The brigade bivouacked, on the night of the eighth, in Madison County, on the road leading to Culpeper Court-House, and about one mile from Madison Mills, on the Rapidan River. On the morning of the ninth, the br
report the operations of my command on the ninth instant, during the engagement near Cedar Run: On the morning of the ninth, the First, Second, and Third brigades of this division, under Brigadiege Court-House early on the morning of the ninth instant, bringing up the rear of the whole army. d in the battle of Cedar Run, on Saturday, the ninth, Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortattle of Cedar Run, Culpeper County, on the ninth instant: The following regiments constitute thethe battle of Slaughter's Mountain, on the ninth instant, which, I fear, will be an imperfect one, r: I have the honor to report that, on the ninth instant, my regiment was ordered on a reconnoissanllery in this division in the fight of the ninth instant, at Mrs. Crittenden's farm, near Slaughteriment in the battle of Cedar Creek, on the ninth instant: The regiment, being under my command, ave the honor to report that, on Saturday, the ninth, about the hour of five P. M., the first briga[25 more...]
wn, and in line of battle. By orders of General Jackson, with my brigade, I formed a line of battle along a fence separating the field from the woods and at right angles with the main road by which I was advancing. I was severely shelled at various times during the night, while the firing of the skirmishers was periodical from a little while after dark until near eleven o'clock next morning. The entire brigade remained in line of battle until ordered back at or near ten o'clock A. M., tenth instant. The following companies were deployed as skirmishers, and behaved with that gallantry and coolness that entitle the officers and men to the highest praise, viz.: Company A, Captain Grigsby; company B, Captain Cumming, and company D, Captain Hodges, of the Ninth Louisiana regiment. The casualties of the brigade were twenty wounded and four killed. Deeply do I regret to state that the following named officers (and a few privates, who could not be detected) absented themselves without le
as confirmed in my opinion that the heavy forces concentrated in front rendered it unwise, on my part, to renew the action. The main body of my troops were, however, so posted as to receive the attack, if the enemy decided to advance. On the eleventh, a flag of truce was received from the enemy, who requested permission, until two o'clock, to remove and bury his dead, not already interred by our troops. This was granted, and the time subsequently extended, by request of the enemy, to five ie thousand and sixty (1060) wounded. Total loss of killed, wounded, and missing, one thousand three hundred and fourteen (1314.) This loss was probably about one half that sustained by the enemy. I remained in position until the night of the eleventh, when I returned to the vicinity of Gordonsville, in order to avoid being attacked by the vastly superior force in front of me, and with the hope that, by thus falling back, General Pope would be induced to follow me until I should be reenforced
, he was ordered to halt, and remained until morning. I joined in with Colonel Lee, of the Thirty-third, and advanced, overtaking the Second and Fourth, who had halted in a cornfield, on the right of the main road leading to Culpeper Court-House, where the brigade remained over night and until about nine o'clock on the morning of the tenth. The enemy not having made any demonstration up to that time, we were ordered back a distance of about three miles, and camped until the morning of the twelfth, when we were ordered to take up the line of march to our old camp, near Liberty Mills, at which place we arrived about six o'clock P. M. I forward with this a list of casualties. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. J. Williams, Major, commanding Fifth Virginia Infantry. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Hughes. headquarters Forty-Eighth regiment Alabama volunteers, August 13, 1862. Colonel A. G. Taliaferro, commanding Third Brigade, Army of the Valley: sir: I have the h
e veterans, although this was their first engagement. Besides, there was no opportunity for individual distinction. There were none absent without leave, nor could I have made them leave, even if I had ordered it. L. E. D'Aquin, Captain. Report of Captain Carpenter. headquarters Carpenter's battery, in camp near Gordonsville, August 14, 1862. To Colonel Ronald, commanding First Brigade, V. D.: sir: In obedience to circular issued from headquarters Valley District, on the thirteenth instant, I have to make the following report of the part taken by this battery in the action of Cedar Run, on the ninth day of August, 1862. I received orders early in the afternoon to take my Parrott piece to the front, which was promptly executed, placing it in position within seven hundred yards of five or six pieces of the enemy. Major Andrews, thinking it would be rather an unequal contest, ordered me not to commence firing until Captain Poague could bring his in position, when we comme
rs Department of Northern Virginia: General: I have the honor herewith to submit to you a report of the operations of my command in the battle of Cedar Run, on the ninth day of August, 1862: Intelligence having reached the commanding General that Gordonsville was endangered by the approach of the enemy, I was ordered to move in that direction with Ewell's and Jackson's divisions, from my position on the Mechanicsville turnpike, near Richmond. I arrived near Gordonsville on the nineteenth day of July. From information received respecting the strength of the opposing Federal army, under General Pope, I requested the commanding General to reenforce me. He accordingly sent forward Major-General A. P. Hill, with his division. On the second of August, whilst Colonel (now Brigadier-General) W. E. Jones, by direction of Brigadier-General Robertson, was moving with the Seventh Virginia cavalry to take charge of picket posts on the Rapidan, he received intelligence, before he reached Or
August 2nd (search for this): chapter 87
rdonsville was endangered by the approach of the enemy, I was ordered to move in that direction with Ewell's and Jackson's divisions, from my position on the Mechanicsville turnpike, near Richmond. I arrived near Gordonsville on the nineteenth day of July. From information received respecting the strength of the opposing Federal army, under General Pope, I requested the commanding General to reenforce me. He accordingly sent forward Major-General A. P. Hill, with his division. On the second of August, whilst Colonel (now Brigadier-General) W. E. Jones, by direction of Brigadier-General Robertson, was moving with the Seventh Virginia cavalry to take charge of picket posts on the Rapidan, he received intelligence, before he reached Orange Court-House, that the enemy was in possession of the town. Finding the main street filled with Federal cavalry, Colonel Jones boldly charged the head of the Federal column, whilst its flank was attacked by another portion of the regiment, under Majo
August 7th (search for this): chapter 87
emselves so gallantly, it is impossible to mention particular individuals, although there were those whose gallant conduct renders them worthy of the proudest position. H. C. Wood, Major, commanding Thirty-seventh Regiment. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Walton. camp twenty-Third Virginia regiment, August 13, 1862. Colonel A. G. Taliaferro, commanding Third Brigade: The Twenty-third Virginia regiment left its camp at this place, with the rest of the army, on the evening of the seventh August. It marched about eight miles that night, and bivouacked near Orange Court-House. The march was resumed early next morning, but not continued for more than a few miles, when it again halted for the purpose of cooking two days rations, rest, &c., During the night, a portion of the enemy's cavalry fired upon our pickets, and attempted to cut off our train of wagons. Our regiment was ordered to support the pickets, which it did, lying on its arms nearly all night. Some time after midnig
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