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C. H. Young (search for this): chapter 87
we were ordered to the road to follow in the pursuit. My loss in killed was only two; in wounded, eleven; and in missing, two--making a total of fifteen. The officers and men behaved well. Lieutenant-Colonel Gray and Major Cole, Twenty-second, and Captain Ashford, Thirty-eighth, handled their men skilfully, showing great coolness. Captain Ashe, my Assistant Adjutant-General, deserves notice for his conduct, being found at every point almost at the same time, directing the men. Lieutenant Young, my Aid-de-camp, acted with his usual efficiency. Language cannot express the appreciation I have for his services in action. Very respectfully, W. D. Pender. Report of Brigadier-General Early. headquarters Fourth brigade, Third division, August 14, 1862. Captain G. C. Brown, Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division: Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my brigade in the battle on Cedar Creek, near Slaughter's Mountain, in Culpep
George W. Wooding (search for this): chapter 87
Wood, Thirty-seventh Virginia; Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson, of the Forty-seventh Alabama regiment; Colonel Sheffield, of the Forty-eighth Alabama regiment, who was severely wounded; Major Aldrich, Forty-eighth Alabama regiment, severely wounded; and of his A. A. G., Lieutenant-Colonel F. Coleman. The batteries of the division, engaged in the action, were those of Captains Carpenter, Poague, and Caskie. The officers and men of these batteries behaved well. Captain Caskie was wounded. Captain Wooding's battery was not engaged; he himself acted for a time with the General commanding. I have the honor to enclose herewith the reports of brigade, regimental, and battery commanders, to which the Major-General is referred for more minute details, and a list of killed and wounded of the division. No one can estimate the loss this brigade and this division of the army has sustained in the early death of Brigadier-General Winder. He was warmly beloved by all who knew him as a man, and h
H. C. Wood (search for this): chapter 87
ent would have been able to maintain its position had the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Alabama regiments been able to have maintained theirs. I must express my thanks to the officers and men of this regiment for the gallant manner in which they conducted themselves during the whole engagement; and, where all conducted themselves so gallantly, it is impossible to mention particular individuals, although there were those whose gallant conduct renders them worthy of the proudest position. H. C. Wood, Major, commanding Thirty-seventh Regiment. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Walton. camp twenty-Third Virginia regiment, August 13, 1862. Colonel A. G. Taliaferro, commanding Third Brigade: The Twenty-third Virginia regiment left its camp at this place, with the rest of the army, on the evening of the seventh August. It marched about eight miles that night, and bivouacked near Orange Court-House. The march was resumed early next morning, but not continued for more than a few mi
Charles Wood (search for this): chapter 87
ay under an overwhelming force, the right, and particularly the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, which deserves special mention for its firmness and admirable conduct in the engagement, remained unbroken. Colonel Taliaferro particularly mentions Major Stover, commanding Tenth Virginia regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Curtis, commanding Twenty-third Virginia, who fell mortally wounded ; Major Walton, Twenty-third Virginia; Colonel T. C. Williams, of the Thirty-seventh Virginia, who was wounded; Major Wood, Thirty-seventh Virginia; Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson, of the Forty-seventh Alabama regiment; Colonel Sheffield, of the Forty-eighth Alabama regiment, who was severely wounded; Major Aldrich, Forty-eighth Alabama regiment, severely wounded; and of his A. A. G., Lieutenant-Colonel F. Coleman. The batteries of the division, engaged in the action, were those of Captains Carpenter, Poague, and Caskie. The officers and men of these batteries behaved well. Captain Caskie was wounded. Captain
W. A. Witcher (search for this): chapter 87
has since died, while fearlessly exposing himself in looking out a position for his battery. I have the honor to remain very respectfully, Your obedient servant, S. Crutchfield, Colonel and Chief Artillery Second Corps. Report of Captain Witcher, of twenty-first Virginia regiment. camp near Gordonsville, August 13, 1862. Major John Seddon, commanding Second Brigade: sir: In obedience to order, I offer the following report of the Twenty-first Virginia regiment in the battle o with their guns, and bayoneted him in several places. He was in his proper mind at the time of making this statement, and died the same night. Accompanying this report I forward a list of casualties. Respectfully, your obedient servant, W. A. Witcher, Captain, commanding Twenty-first Virginia Regiment. Report of Major Seddon. headquarters First Virginia battalion. Second brigade, First division, A. V. D., August 14, 1862. Lieutenant-Colonel T. L. Garnett, commanding Second Brigad
on our pickets, and attempted to cut off our train of wagons. Our regiment was ordered to support the pickets, which it did, lying on its arms nearly all night. Some time after midnight our main guard was driven in, and the regiment double-quicked half a mile to meet the enemy. There was a sharp skirmish for a few minutes, and the enemy were routed. We took one prisoner and captured two horses. During this skirmish, Lieutenant Trice, of company G, was badly wounded in the neck. Lieutenant Winston, of company A, was also wounded. The army, or at least one portion of it, had a long and distressing march on the ninth, to the field where, on that evening, was fought the battle of Cedar Creek--distressing on account of the excessive heat, and scarcity of good water. The brigade reached the battle-field about four o'clock. This regiment, which had been on the left during the day, was detached and sent to the right, where it was ordered to lie down in the woods just in rear of Peg
William J. Winn (search for this): chapter 87
osition again. The infantry still falling back, I again limbered up, and, from carelessness of the drivers, broke the pole, when with difficulty got the piece off, leaving the limber on the field, which I had repaired as soon as the Yankees were driven back, being ready for service by nine o'clock. The other three pieces were brought up under range of the enemy's guns, but not ordered into position. The detachment which was engaged deserves particular notice as having done their duty. Some two or three of them, having exhausted themselves so, felt unable to do anything. Sending word back to the Captain, he started to bring me a new detachment, when he was wounded in the forehead. W. M. McAllister, (private,) shot through the arm, the only man wounded. I also have to report private William J. Winn as having left the company that morning without leave, and not being seen till the next day, which he has been in the habit of doing. J. C. Carpenter, Lieutenant, commanding Battery.
Charles S. Winder (search for this): chapter 87
upon the Federal batteries. By this time, General Winder, with Jackson's division, had arrived, andnt, Branch's brigade, of Hill's division, with Winder's brigade farther to the left, met the Federal other caissons and a limber; three colors, by Winder's brigade, one being from the Fifth Connecticuar Run, on Saturday, the ninth, Brigadier-General Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded; whereuponthen engaging our batteries on the right. General Winder was in the front, directing, with great abnced several of them. Shortly after this, General Winder was mortally wounded and borne from the fiilled and fifty-one wounded. This includes General Winder; and in his death the brigade was deprived. This was the last order I received from General Winder, whose untimely death none more deplore thP. M., when I was notified of the death of General Winder, commanding the First division, and that y of our troops was the division of Brigadier-General C. S. Winder, and its artillery became first en[6 more...]
C. S. Winder (search for this): chapter 87
y has sustained in the early death of Brigadier-General Winder. He was warmly beloved by all who knme. Whilst waiting for the message from General Winder, I reconnoitred the ground in front, and to the school-house, I found a courier from General Winder, with the information that he was ready. nt my aid, Lieutenant S. H. Early, back to General Winder for reenforcements, with directions to comore this request could be complied with by General Winder, Captain Brown, of the Chesapeake artillerllowed in a short time by some pieces from General Winder's command from the corner of the field wheo our left, and notice of this was sent to General Winder, with the caution to be on the lookout; buom the woods to the left by some troops of General Winder's command, and the infantry fight then beg him Lieutenant Hardy, while the guns from General Winder's division were farther to the left and soe enemy advancing, the rear of the guns of General Winder's division was exposed, and they were with[13 more...]
R. N. Wilson (search for this): chapter 87
y wounded; of Major Seddon, commanding First Virginia battalion; Captain Hannum, of the Forty-eighth Virginia; Captain Dyerle, Forty-eighth, mortally wounded; Captain Wilson, A. A. G.; Lieutenant Dabney, A. D. C., and Lieutenant White, A. D. C. The Third brigade, Colonel A. G. Taliaferro, Twenty-third Virginia, commanding, was f arrived, and I received orders from the General to look well to my left flank, and to report at once to General Taliaferro for reinforcements. Accordingly, Captain Wilson, Assistant Adjutant-General Second brigade, and Lieutenant White, Acting Aid-de-camp, were sent in different parts of the field to insure an early interview we among civilized nations. To the members of my staff all praise is due for their bravery and efficiency in the discharge of every duty. They consisted of Captain Wilson, Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieutenant Dabney, Aid-de-camp; and Lieutenant White, First Virginia battalion, Acting Aid-de-camp. For further particulars, the
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