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Port Tobacco (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
r, B. Montgomery. Next day sent them under guard to Washington, accompanied by a Dr. Hardie, whom I arrested upon suspicion of harboring these men previous to crossing. They are all now comfortably situated at the Capitol Prison. Arrived at Port Tobacco the evening of the second, where we encamped for the night. Discovered nothing at this place of a suspicious character. The morning of the third visited Captain Kenyon, commanding squadron of Scott's Legion, at Chapel Point, about four miles below Port Tobacco. His whole force is stationed at this point, and he sends out parties into the surrounding country only upon receiving information that something of a treasonable nature is going on. He had lately made several captures of contraband goods, also some prisoners. Reached the village of Chaptico the same day about eleven P. M., and arrested a Mr. C. C. Spaulding, merchant, who for some time has been engaged in violating the blockade. Found in his money drawer letters implica
Wicomico (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
the same day about eleven P. M., and arrested a Mr. C. C. Spaulding, merchant, who for some time has been engaged in violating the blockade. Found in his money drawer letters implicating him. Also found in his storehouse several boxes mysteriously directed in large letters to O. K., of which he could give no account whatever. At two A. M., of the fourth instant, started for Leonardtown, fourteen miles distant. On the way searched the house of a Mr. Maddox, situate on the banks of the Wicomico River. Discovered nothing. Reached Leonardtown about daylight, and arrested a Mr. E. Lee Spaulding, brother to C. C. Spaulding. Found in his safe nineteen hundred dollars in Southern money, taken in payment for bill of goods sold to a party of whom he knew nothing, not even so far as his name. He had made no entry of this, nor of many similar sales, upon the book, and gave the man no receipt. He had packed the goods in small bundles, at the request of the purchaser. The only account of t
Pamunkey (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ds of ten to twenty. Immediately upon receipt of this information I started for Pamunkey Landing, which is situated on the Potomac River, near the mouth of Pamunkey River. Upon arriving within a mile and a half of the river, I ordered fifty men to dismount, and marched them down to a place called Fishtown, situated upon the Poell, whom I had sent back from Newport on the afternoon of the third, in command of twenty men, with orders to make a more thorough search of the neighborhood of Pamunkey; also to arrest certain individuals suspected of entertaining parties who belonged to the opposite shore. I released them, however, because of insufficient proof against them. Left Pamunkey the sixth instant, at eight A. M., and arrived in Washington at three P. M. The cases of Mr. C. C. Spaulding and Mr. E. Lee Spaulding were investigated by General Wadsworth. The former was pronounced guilty of having violated the blockade, fined three hundred dollars, and released; the latter was
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 28
Doc. 28.-how Smuggling was carried on. Report of Captain Dunham. headquarters Defences of Washington. Sir: Agreeably to instructions received from Captain Richard B. Irwin, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Major-General Banks, to visit the lower part of Maryland as far as Leonardtown, St. Mary's county, and arreshe party belonged to the rebel army. Their names were as follows: Theodore Dent, J. R. Bateman, J. I. Turner, B. Montgomery. Next day sent them under guard to Washington, accompanied by a Dr. Hardie, whom I arrested upon suspicion of harboring these men previous to crossing. They are all now comfortably situated at the Capitol d to the opposite shore. I released them, however, because of insufficient proof against them. Left Pamunkey the sixth instant, at eight A. M., and arrived in Washington at three P. M. The cases of Mr. C. C. Spaulding and Mr. E. Lee Spaulding were investigated by General Wadsworth. The former was pronounced guilty of having
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
was carried on. Report of Captain Dunham. headquarters Defences of Washington. Sir: Agreeably to instructions received from Captain Richard B. Irwin, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Major-General Banks, to visit the lower part of Maryland as far as Leonardtown, St. Mary's county, and arrest all parties suspected of smuggling articles into Virginia, or of selling goods to individuals who purposed conveying them across the Potomac, also to examine the post-offices at the many villaat a large contraband trade was carried on in the neighborhood of Pamunkey Landing, some ten miles below Piscataway, and that drafted men and men belonging to the rebel army (the former to avoid serving, and the latter to visit their families in Maryland) were constantly crossing the Potomac at night, frequently in squads of ten to twenty. Immediately upon receipt of this information I started for Pamunkey Landing, which is situated on the Potomac River, near the mouth of Pamunkey River. Upo
Piscataway (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
ection of country, I have the honor to report that I started on November first, 1862, on the above expedition, accompanied by a squadron of the First Ohio cavalry, numbering seventy men, commanded by Captain N. D. Menken; reached the village of Piscataway at three P. M.; found nothing here to excite my suspicions, but I learned from the inhabitants that a large contraband trade was carried on in the neighborhood of Pamunkey Landing, some ten miles below Piscataway, and that drafted men and men bPiscataway, and that drafted men and men belonging to the rebel army (the former to avoid serving, and the latter to visit their families in Maryland) were constantly crossing the Potomac at night, frequently in squads of ten to twenty. Immediately upon receipt of this information I started for Pamunkey Landing, which is situated on the Potomac River, near the mouth of Pamunkey River. Upon arriving within a mile and a half of the river, I ordered fifty men to dismount, and marched them down to a place called Fishtown, situated upon
Chaptico (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
rmation that something of a treasonable nature is going on. He had lately made several captures of contraband goods, also some prisoners. Reached the village of Chaptico the same day about eleven P. M., and arrested a Mr. C. C. Spaulding, merchant, who for some time has been engaged in violating the blockade. Found in his money The only account of the sale he could produce was a bill without name or date. Left Leonardtown afternoon of same day, with Mr. E. L. Spaulding, and reached Chaptico at seven P. M., where we encamped for the night. Left Chaptico on the fifth with Mr. C. C. Spaulding and E. Lee Spaulding, in arrest; arrived at Pamunkey LandinChaptico on the fifth with Mr. C. C. Spaulding and E. Lee Spaulding, in arrest; arrived at Pamunkey Landing at seven P. M., where we were rejoined by Lieutenant Hartwell, whom I had sent back from Newport on the afternoon of the third, in command of twenty men, with orders to make a more thorough search of the neighborhood of Pamunkey; also to arrest certain individuals suspected of entertaining parties who belonged to the opposite sh
Chapel Point (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
on. Arrived at Port Tobacco the evening of the second, where we encamped for the night. Discovered nothing at this place of a suspicious character. The morning of the third visited Captain Kenyon, commanding squadron of Scott's Legion, at Chapel Point, about four miles below Port Tobacco. His whole force is stationed at this point, and he sends out parties into the surrounding country only upon receiving information that something of a treasonable nature is going on. He had lately made sevbout four miles below Fort Washington to the mouth of the Potomac. The blockade cannot be effectual, for thousands of dollars worth of goods are monthly smuggled into Virginia. I would respectfully suggest-- 1. That the force stationed at Chapel Point, on the Potomac, numbering sixty men, be increased to several hundred, as the number now there is wholly inadequate to the amount of labor to be performed. 2. That this force be so disposed as to patrol the country and river shore daily, fr
Leonardtown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
rwin, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Major-General Banks, to visit the lower part of Maryland as far as Leonardtown, St. Mary's county, and arrest all parties suspected of smuggling articles into Virginia, or of selling goods to individuals whoarge letters to O. K., of which he could give no account whatever. At two A. M., of the fourth instant, started for Leonardtown, fourteen miles distant. On the way searched the house of a Mr. Maddox, situate on the banks of the Wicomico River. Discovered nothing. Reached Leonardtown about daylight, and arrested a Mr. E. Lee Spaulding, brother to C. C. Spaulding. Found in his safe nineteen hundred dollars in Southern money, taken in payment for bill of goods sold to a party of whom he kne the request of the purchaser. The only account of the sale he could produce was a bill without name or date. Left Leonardtown afternoon of same day, with Mr. E. L. Spaulding, and reached Chaptico at seven P. M., where we encamped for the night.
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 28
e had packed the goods in small bundles, at the request of the purchaser. The only account of the sale he could produce was a bill without name or date. Left Leonardtown afternoon of same day, with Mr. E. L. Spaulding, and reached Chaptico at seven P. M., where we encamped for the night. Left Chaptico on the fifth with Mr. C. C. Spaulding and E. Lee Spaulding, in arrest; arrived at Pamunkey Landing at seven P. M., where we were rejoined by Lieutenant Hartwell, whom I had sent back from Newport on the afternoon of the third, in command of twenty men, with orders to make a more thorough search of the neighborhood of Pamunkey; also to arrest certain individuals suspected of entertaining parties who belonged to the opposite shore. I released them, however, because of insufficient proof against them. Left Pamunkey the sixth instant, at eight A. M., and arrived in Washington at three P. M. The cases of Mr. C. C. Spaulding and Mr. E. Lee Spaulding were investigated by General Wadsw
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