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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 37
mer was on the left of the Centreville ridge, and the latter in front of it on the Warrenton road. Each covered the retreat of those on the respective roads to the common point, Centreville, from there to the rear. Colonel Richardson was behind, and covered the main body. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Irvin McDowell, Brigadier-General, commanding. Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. Special despatch to the Detroit daily Tribune. Washington, July 23. My brigade has just arrived, after covering the retreat of the entire army. All are up in tolerable good order. The Michigan Second and Third regiments were in the rear of the whole. J. B. Richardson, Commanding Fourth Brigade. General Willcox's report. Detroit, Michigan, September 3, 1861. Brig.-General L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: General: My brigade, the Second of Heintzelman's division, marching in rear of Franklin's origade, arrived at the Sudley Ford
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Zouaves for this important service, leaving the Thirty-eighth under its gallant and experienced Colonel Hobart Ward. Ricketts was soon ordered to take a new position near the Henry house. The Zouaves followed in support, and finally formed line on the right flank of the battery with two companies in reserve. Up to this time the enemy had fallen back, but now he formed the remains of his brigades engaged with Hunter in the morning, viz., Bee's, Barton's and Evans's, in a new line upon Jackson's brigade of fresh troops, making all together six thousand five hundred infantry, thirteen pieces of artillery, and Stuart's cavalry, according to General Beauregard's report. This force was posted in the belt of woods which skirted the plateau southwardly, and lying in the angle formed in that direction, between the Warrenton and Sudley roads, about a mile from the Warrenton road, and with its left resting on the Brentsville and Sudley road. Ricketts's battery had crossed the Sudley roa
Arlington (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Doc. 37.-the battle of Manassas. [correction of official Reports.] headquarters Department N. E. V., Arlington, August 13, 1861. Colonel Richardson, commanding Fourth Brigade: Sir: I herewith enclose you an extract from a supplemental report of Brigadier-General McDowell, of the battle of Bull Run, on the twenty-first ultimo. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. headquarters Department N. E. V., Arlington, August 12,Arlington, August 12, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel E. D. Townsend, A. A. G., Headquarters of the Army: Colonel: My attention has been called by those interested, to two omissions in my report of the battle of the twenty-first ultimo, near Manassas, and I ask leave to make the following corrections, wishing that they be made part of my original report. In speaking of the retreat, I mentioned that it was covered by Colonel Blenker's brigade. I should have said Colonel Richardson's and Colonel Blenker's brigades. Th
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ective roads to the common point, Centreville, from there to the rear. Colonel Richardson was behind, and covered the main body. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Irvin McDowell, Brigadier-General, commanding. Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. Special despatch to the Detroit daily Tribune. Washington, July 23. My brigade has just arrived, after covering the retreat of the entire army. All are up in tolerable good order. The Michigan Second and Third regiments were in the rear of the whole. J. B. Richardson, Commanding Fourth Brigade. General Willcox's report. Detroit, Michigan, September 3, 1861. Brig.-General L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: General: My brigade, the Second of Heintzelman's division, marching in rear of Franklin's origade, arrived at the Sudley Ford at about half past 12 P. M., July twenty-first, 1861. The brigade now consisted of the First Michigan, Eleventh New York, (Fire Zouaves), Thi
Brentsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
he morning, viz., Bee's, Barton's and Evans's, in a new line upon Jackson's brigade of fresh troops, making all together six thousand five hundred infantry, thirteen pieces of artillery, and Stuart's cavalry, according to General Beauregard's report. This force was posted in the belt of woods which skirted the plateau southwardly, and lying in the angle formed in that direction, between the Warrenton and Sudley roads, about a mile from the Warrenton road, and with its left resting on the Brentsville and Sudley road. Ricketts's battery had crossed the Sudley road, from its post near Dogan's house, and was within musket range of the woods, which stretched from that road around from his right towards his front, and forming a pocket, which almost enveloped the battery with its support. The enemy were first discovered by Colonel Heintzelman, lining the woods in our front. He ordered up the Zouaves, commanded by Colonel Farnham. The ground was slightly rising before us, and the enemy
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
e twenty-first ultimo, near Manassas, and I ask leave to make the following corrections, wishing that they be made part of my original report. In speaking of the retreat, I mentioned that it was covered by Colonel Blenker's brigade. I should have said Colonel Richardson's and Colonel Blenker's brigades. The former was on the left of the Centreville ridge, and the latter in front of it on the Warrenton road. Each covered the retreat of those on the respective roads to the common point, Centreville, from there to the rear. Colonel Richardson was behind, and covered the main body. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Irvin McDowell, Brigadier-General, commanding. Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. Special despatch to the Detroit daily Tribune. Washington, July 23. My brigade has just arrived, after covering the retreat of the entire army. All are up in tolerable good order. The Michigan Second and Third regiments were in
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 37
l, Brigadier-General, commanding. Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. Special despatch to the Detroit daily Tribune. Washington, July 23. My brigade has just arrived, after covering the retreat of the entire army. All are up in tolerable good order. The Michigan Second and Third regiments were in the rear of the whole. J. B. Richardson, Commanding Fourth Brigade. General Willcox's report. Detroit, Michigan, September 3, 1861. Brig.-General L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: General: My brigade, the Second of Heintzelman's division, marching in rear of Franklin's origade, arrived at the Sudley Ford at about half past 12 P. M., July twenty-first, 1861. The brigade now consisted of the First Michigan, Eleventh New York, (Fire Zouaves), Thirty-eighth New York, and Arnold's battery. The Fourth Michigan had been left at Fairfax Station and Fairfax Court-House by order of General McDowell. Halting for rest and water, I obeyed the General's orders to post Arn
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
should have said Colonel Richardson's and Colonel Blenker's brigades. The former was on the left of the Centreville ridge, and the latter in front of it on the Warrenton road. Each covered the retreat of those on the respective roads to the common point, Centreville, from there to the rear. Colonel Richardson was behind, and cohe junction of the Warrenton and Sudley roads. The troops on our left were engaged in a desultory fire with the enemy posted in the thicket and ravine across the Warrenton road, not far from the Henry house. The Thirty-eighth New York was quickly formed in order of battle, and the Zouaves were hastening into line, when I received lt of woods which skirted the plateau southwardly, and lying in the angle formed in that direction, between the Warrenton and Sudley roads, about a mile from the Warrenton road, and with its left resting on the Brentsville and Sudley road. Ricketts's battery had crossed the Sudley road, from its post near Dogan's house, and was wi
Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
be, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Irvin McDowell, Brigadier-General, commanding. Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. Special despatch to the Detroit daily Tribune. Washington, July 23. My brigade has just arrived, after covering the retreat of the entire army. All are up in tolerable good order. The Michigan Second and Third regiments were in the rear of the whole. J. B. Richardson, Commanding Fourth Brigade. General Willcox's report. Detroit, Michigan, September 3, 1861. Brig.-General L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen. U. S. A.: General: My brigade, the Second of Heintzelman's division, marching in rear of Franklin's origade, arrived at the Sudley Ford at about half past 12 P. M., July twenty-first, 1861. The brigade now consisted of the First Michigan, Eleventh New York, (Fire Zouaves), Thirty-eighth New York, and Arnold's battery. The Fourth Michigan had been left at Fairfax Station and Fairfax Court-House by order of General McDowell.
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 37
of Franklin's or Sherman's brigade. The officers and men of the First Michigan stood up bravely at this critical moment, holding on anxiously for reenforcements. But from all I can learn, the Thirty-eighth, which was ordered up to me, were directed to the left of the Henry house, (instead of to the right and along the Sudley road,) came in contact with the enemy's centre, and never reached me. It was now nearly four o'clock. General Beauregard had been gathering new reenforcements. General Kirby Smith had joined him with a portion of Johnston's army. Our scattered troops were contending in fractions against the enemy's army in position, and massed on the plateau, with his artillery sweeping every approach. General Johnston was bringing fresh troops to turn our own right. The Twenty-eighth Virginia attacked my own handful from the rear in the woods, and I had the ill fortune to be wounded, and a few moments afterwards captured. But I was spared witnessing, the disaster which fur
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