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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 44
t you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that information to any one concerning the movements of the Government troops, and that I did not believe you knew any thing about what was going on after I reached Washington, in July, 1861, for I did not think you were in Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service.Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Col. H. L. Scott, Elizabeth, N. J.
Elizabethtown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 44
the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you what I have always said when questioned in regard to this story, viz.: that I never had the slightest reason to suppose for an instant that you did, on the occasion referred to, or any other, give any information to any one concerning the movements of the Government troops, and that I did not believe you knew any thing about what was going on after I reached Washington, in July, 1861, for I did not think you were in Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Col. H. L. Scott, Elizabeth, N. J.
Geneva (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 44
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wh
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 44
the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you what I have always said when questioned in regard to this story, viz.: that I never had the slightest reason to suppose for an instant that you did, on the occasion referred to, or any other, give any information to any one concerning the movements of the Government troops, and that I did not believe you knew any thing about what was going on after I reached Washington, in July, 1861, for I did not think you were in Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Col. H. L. Scott, Elizabeth, N. J.
H. L. Scott (search for this): chapter 44
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as followsing on after I reached Washington, in July, 1861, for I did not think you were in Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonhe period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Col. H. L. Scott, Elizabeth, N. J.
G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 44
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think iMcClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wh
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wh
January 11th, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 44
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wh
December 24th (search for this): chapter 44
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wha
July, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 44
the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you what I have always said when questioned in regard to this story, viz.: that I never had the slightest reason to suppose for an instant that you did, on the occasion referred to, or any other, give any information to any one concerning the movements of the Government troops, and that I did not believe you knew any thing about what was going on after I reached Washington, in July, 1861, for I did not think you were in Washington at all from the period of my arrival there up to the retirement of General Scott from active service. I always regarded this story as simply one of the many slanders which were so abundant during the excitement of the war. I am, Colonel, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Col. H. L. Scott, Elizabeth, N. J.