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Hill, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ayou Deview, July 9, 1863. Captain W. C. thomas, A. A. General: Sir: In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part my regiment took in the action at Helena, on the fourth instant: At eleven o'clock P. M., on the night of the third, we left our encampment, six miles from Helena, and marched to take up our positions in front of the intrenchments, my regiment being in the advance. The road over which we passed (known as the Hill road, from Little Rock to Helena) was extremely rugged, and it was not without considerable difficulty, and great fatigue to the men, that we succeeded in getting within one mile of the enemy's intrenchments. At this point I found the road blockaded with fallen timber to such an extent, that I halted the brigade, of which I was temporarily in command, sent Captain Millar's company, which had been in advance, to the rear, and sent forward Captain P. G. Roper's company (A), deployed as skirmis
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
d gallantly assisted by Major L. A. Maclean, A. A. G. My thanks are due to my Aids-de-Camp, Lieutenant Richard T. Morrison and Lieutenant Celsus Price, for their willing assistance promptly rendered upon this, as upon other hotly contested fields. I commend all these officers to the Lieutenant-General commanding, and through him to the President, for promotion, on account of gallant and meritorious conduct in the field. Acting Engineers, John Mhoon, of Alabama, and D. C. Cage, of Mississippi, not only deserve honorable mention for their gallantry upon the field, but for the skill and energy with which they overcame the difficulties that obstructed my road from Cache River to Helena. I have repeatedly recommended Mr. Mhoon for appointment in the Engineer corps, and again respectfully urge the President to recognize the worth of so excellent an officer. Mr. Cage's services demand a similar recognition. Nor should the less conspicuous, but equally useful, services of Major
Phillips (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
e engagement was four killed and eight wounded--one mortally, two seriously, and five slightly. For particulars I refer you to Dr. Dunn, surgeon of my regiment. The officers and men of my regiment and battery deserve great credit for gallantry and courage displayed on that day. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, arch. S. Dobbins, Colonel, commanding Regiment Cavalry. Report of Colonel Newton. headquarters Newton's regiment Arkansas cavalry, camp at Gist's, Phillips county, Arkansas, July 8, 1863. Captain J. C. Alexander, A. A. G. Walker's Division, &c., in the Field: Captain: I have the honor, in obedience to your instructions of to-day, to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the attack on Helena on the fourth instant: I reached Mrs. Moonley's and halted there about twelve o'clock P. M., on the third instant. About an hour before day on the morning of the fourth, in obedience to an order from the Brigadier-General commanding
Lick Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
nd rear. I could see the force which engaged Walker's brigade, and at no time did it exceed five hundred; I think three hundred a big estimate. Walker's brigade not only did not prevent reinforcements from going to Fort Reiter, but the enemy, after sunrise, actually passed to my left, and half a mile to my rear, and held that position during the day. Very respectfully, J. Marmaduke, Brigadier-General, commanding. Report of General Walker. Headquarters in the field, camp near Lick Creek, July 7, 1863. Major: I have the honor to submit the following report of the conduct of my cavalry brigade, in the battle before Helena, on the fourth instant: In obedience to General Orders No. 2, I moved my command towards Helena, on Sterling's road. Arriving at the blockade before daylight I dismounted and sent forward three companies, attempting to capture the enemy's pickets in that direction. At daylight, I sent forward three more companies dismounted, and commenced the work
Cache River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
promptly rendered upon this, as upon other hotly contested fields. I commend all these officers to the Lieutenant-General commanding, and through him to the President, for promotion, on account of gallant and meritorious conduct in the field. Acting Engineers, John Mhoon, of Alabama, and D. C. Cage, of Mississippi, not only deserve honorable mention for their gallantry upon the field, but for the skill and energy with which they overcame the difficulties that obstructed my road from Cache River to Helena. I have repeatedly recommended Mr. Mhoon for appointment in the Engineer corps, and again respectfully urge the President to recognize the worth of so excellent an officer. Mr. Cage's services demand a similar recognition. Nor should the less conspicuous, but equally useful, services of Major Isaac Brinker and Major John Reid be passed over in silence. To the practical good sense and untiring and well directed energy of the former, as Chief Quartermaster of my division, I
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 47
ed reports of these casualties as soon as the lists can be carefully revised. The separation of the command will necessarily entail some delay in the revision of them. The admirable conduct of Brigadier-General Parsons, not only upon the field, but upon the march merits my earnest commendation, whilst his skill and gallantry, as well as his long and uninterrupted active service as Brigadier-General, first in the Missouri State Guard, and more recently in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, are, in my opinion, worthy of recognition on the part of the government. I must also commend the excellent discipline which General McRae maintains at all times in his brigade; the marked good sense and energy with which he conducted its march to Helena; the promptitude with which he has always obeyed my commands, and the earnest efforts which he made to reinforce General Fagan towards the close of the attack. I have not in my former reports mentioned the officers of my staff, t
Jacksonport (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
une, 1863, I telegraphed to Lieutenant-General Smith, that I believed I could take the place, and asked his permission to attack it. Two days after I started to Jacksonport, there to consult with Generals Price and Maxmaduke, and to make the necessary preliminary arrangements. The result of this interview was the following orders:it to the Lieutenant-General commanding, the following report of the part taken by this division in the attack made upon Helena on the fourth instant: I left Jacksonport, in obedience to his orders, on the twenty-second day of June, with this division and Marmaduke's division of cavalry. My march was greatly impeded by the extrctfully, Your obedient servant, A. T. Hawthorne, Colonel, commanding Regiment. Report of General Marmaduke. headquarters Marmaduke's division, Jacksonport, Arkansas, July 25, 1863. To Major W. B. Blair, A. A. A. General, District of Arkansas: Major: I have the honor to report herewith the part taken by my command in
Grant's Mill (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
should receive other orders from me. I started to the headquarters of the Brigadier-General commanding, to get permission to use my whole regiment for the purpose of dislodging the enemy, or, failing in that, confining him to his rifle-pits, and thus prevent him from annoying our left. Arriving there, I learned that our troops were withdrawing, and, by General Walker's direction, retired my command to the point where the mountain road, leading from the spring on the Sterling road to the Grant's Mill road, diverges from the Sterling road, and there disposed my forces so as to cover the withdrawal of our troops. When the rear of Dobbins' regiment had passed, I moved back on the Mountain road, as directed, and thence upon Grant's Mill road. I enclose herewith a list of casualties. The officers and men engaged behaved in admirable style. Captains Portis and Bryant, commanding skirmishers, did their duty well. Lieutenant Barnes, who, with his thirty sharpshooters, was almost consta
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 47
of very great importance that they should be driven from their only stronghold in Arkansas. As a means of raising the siege of Vicksburg, and of keeping the Mississippi river closed, in the event of a surrender of that city, the policy of the move was perfectly apparent. Moreover, from information, considered reliable, in my posshills. I then dismounted one hundred and fifty more men, and sent them forward to the same point, and extended the line of skirmishers from the hills to the Mississippi river. I then drew up the remainder of the regiment in line of battle north of the blockade, about four hundred yards in the rear of the line of skirmishers, and armaduke upon the battery and fortifications of Reiter's Hill, and, not learning anything definite, and discovering the enemy moving up between the levee and Mississippi river, I moved my battery forward according to your order, and commenced firing on the enemy advancing, and also the enemy's batteries playing upon General Marmadu
Searcy (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 47
particulars reference is made to list, which is respectfully submitted. Respectfully, D. Mcrae, Brigadier-General Official: Thomas L. Snead, Major and A. A. G. Report of General Fagan. Hradquarters Second brigade, &c., camp at Searcy, Arkansas, July 21, 1863. Major W. B. Blair, A. A. A. General, Headquarters District of Arkansas, &c.: Major: I have the honor to report as follows in regard to the part taken by my brigade in the attack on Helena, upon the fourth instant: On th it, was thirteen hundred and thirty-nine. I have, Major, the honor to be, With much respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Fagan, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel King. Heaquarters King's regiment Arkansas infantry, camp at Searcy, July 22, 1863. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas: Sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the late battle fought at Helena, on the fourth instant: On the night of the third instant I took up the line of
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