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arriving at the specified point another order was received to return. Thus ended the battle of February fifteenth, 1862, so far as the brigade I commanded participated. The number killed and wounded in each regiment, as per Adjutants' reports is as follows:  men and officers.killed.wounded. Third Mississippi regiment546546 Eighth Kentucky regiment3122772 Seventh Texas regiment3052039 First Mississippi regiment3311661  149468218 Making a total of 286 killed and wounded out of 1494 officers and men. I respectfully refer you to documents for the names of the killed and wounded of the different regiments. I cannot call especial attention to one of the field officers under my command without doing injustice to others. Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, assisted by Captains Kennedy and Wells, of the Third Mississippi; Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon, assisted by Major Henry of the Eighth Kentucky; Colonel Gregg, Lieutenant-Colonel Clough, and Major Granbury of the Seventh Texas; Lieutenan
February 15th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 60
C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to submit a report of the action and casualties of the brigade I commanded at the battle of Fort Donelson, on the fifteenth of February, 1862. I have been prevented from doing so sooner from the discourtesy of the Federal authorities either to allow me to make it to a superior officer in captause for which freemen ever fought; and that their families, in after times, may reap the benefits of their noble deeds and costly sacrifices. On Saturday, February fifteenth, 1862, about one o'clock A. M., I received a verbal order from Brigadier-General Pillow to take command of the brigade, commanded up to that by Colonel Dato line, and moved in the direction indicated, but before arriving at the specified point another order was received to return. Thus ended the battle of February fifteenth, 1862, so far as the brigade I commanded participated. The number killed and wounded in each regiment, as per Adjutants' reports is as follows:  men and
September 24th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 60
Doc. 60.-capture of Fort Donelson. Report of Colonel J. M. Simonton. Jackson, Mississippi, September 24, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to submit a report of the action and casualties of the brigade I commanded at the battle of Fort Donelson, on the fifteenth of February, 1862. I have been prevented from doing so sooner from the discourtesy of the Federal authorities either to allow me to make it to a superior officer in captivity with me (but in a different prison), or in any other way; and I now make this report to you direct, because I do not know the whereabouts of the proper division commanders, and from a desire to do justice to the gallant officers and men under my command upon the bloody field; also that the government may know who not only bravely met the invading foe, but shed their blood in the defence of the most holy cause for which freemen ever fought; and that their families, in after times, may
Charles Baldwin (search for this): chapter 60
as formed in column under the crest of the hill in the rear of and to the left of the rifle-pits occupied by our army, and in rear of the brigade commanded by Colonel Baldwin of the Fourteenth Mississippi, in which position we remained until five o'clock A. M. The enemy were in position behind the crests of a number of small hills in front, and to the right of our rifle-pits, and encircling our entire left wing. At the hour above mentioned Colonel Baldwin received orders to move in the direction of the enemy and attack them on the right. I was ordered to follow with my command, which order I obeyed, but, owing to the ground and timber, we were compelled to I immediately sent an order to Lieutenant-Colonel Wells to face his right wing to the right, and wheel it to the right, so that I might occupy a position on Colonel Baldwin's right (the one General Pillow had directed), but by some misunderstanding of the order, or its being miscarried, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells charged his front
B. S. Burnett (search for this): chapter 60
o'clock A. M., I received a verbal order from Brigadier-General Pillow to take command of the brigade, commanded up to that by Colonel Davidson, of the Third Mississippi (and properly the brigade of Brigadier-General Clark of Mississippi,) composed of the following regiments, viz., Third Mississippi, Colonel Davidson, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells commanding; First Mississippi, Colonel Simonton, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton commanding; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg commanding; Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Burnett, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyons commanding; Forty-second Tennessee, Colonel Quarles commanding. The last regiment named, however, was detached previous to going into the action, and from which I have received no report. In obedience to orders, the brigade was formed in column under the crest of the hill in the rear of and to the left of the rifle-pits occupied by our army, and in rear of the brigade commanded by Colonel Baldwin of the Fourteenth Mississippi, in which position we remained un
Charles Clark (search for this): chapter 60
not only bravely met the invading foe, but shed their blood in the defence of the most holy cause for which freemen ever fought; and that their families, in after times, may reap the benefits of their noble deeds and costly sacrifices. On Saturday, February fifteenth, 1862, about one o'clock A. M., I received a verbal order from Brigadier-General Pillow to take command of the brigade, commanded up to that by Colonel Davidson, of the Third Mississippi (and properly the brigade of Brigadier-General Clark of Mississippi,) composed of the following regiments, viz., Third Mississippi, Colonel Davidson, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells commanding; First Mississippi, Colonel Simonton, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton commanding; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg commanding; Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Burnett, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyons commanding; Forty-second Tennessee, Colonel Quarles commanding. The last regiment named, however, was detached previous to going into the action, and from which I have receive
Captains Clough (search for this): chapter 60
h on an enemy at least four times their number. For one long hour this point was hotly contested by the enemy, and many gallant officers and brave men fell in the faithful discharge of their duty; among whom was the lamented and daring Lieutenant-Colonel Clough of the Seventh Texas, together with a number of company officers, whose names are mentioned in the list of killed and wounded. At this moment I was informed by an Adjutant that the command was running short of ammunition. I immediaters under my command without doing injustice to others. Lieutenant-Colonel Wells, assisted by Captains Kennedy and Wells, of the Third Mississippi; Lieutenant-Colonel Lyon, assisted by Major Henry of the Eighth Kentucky; Colonel Gregg, Lieutenant-Colonel Clough, and Major Granbury of the Seventh Texas; Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton and Major Johnston, of the First Mississippi, all won for themselves the confidence of their commands, and are entitled to the highest commendation of their countryme
Samuel Cooper (search for this): chapter 60
Doc. 60.-capture of Fort Donelson. Report of Colonel J. M. Simonton. Jackson, Mississippi, September 24, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to submit a report of the action and casualties of the brigade I commanded at the battle of Fort Donelson, on the fifteenth of February, 1862. I have been prevented from doing so sooner from the discourtesy of the Federal authorities either to allow me to make it to a superior officer in captivity with me (but in a different prison), or in any other way; and I now make this report to you direct, because I do not know the whereabouts of the proper division commanders, and from a desire to do justice to the gallant officers and men under my command upon the bloody field; also that the government may know who not only bravely met the invading foe, but shed their blood in the defence of the most holy cause for which freemen ever fought; and that their families, in after times, ma
H. B. Davidson (search for this): chapter 60
reap the benefits of their noble deeds and costly sacrifices. On Saturday, February fifteenth, 1862, about one o'clock A. M., I received a verbal order from Brigadier-General Pillow to take command of the brigade, commanded up to that by Colonel Davidson, of the Third Mississippi (and properly the brigade of Brigadier-General Clark of Mississippi,) composed of the following regiments, viz., Third Mississippi, Colonel Davidson, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells commanding; First Mississippi, Colonel SColonel Davidson, Lieutenant-Colonel Wells commanding; First Mississippi, Colonel Simonton, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton commanding; Seventh Texas, Colonel Gregg commanding; Eighth Kentucky, Colonel Burnett, Lieutenant-Colonel Lyons commanding; Forty-second Tennessee, Colonel Quarles commanding. The last regiment named, however, was detached previous to going into the action, and from which I have received no report. In obedience to orders, the brigade was formed in column under the crest of the hill in the rear of and to the left of the rifle-pits occupied by our army, and i
Doc. 60.-capture of Fort Donelson. Report of Colonel J. M. Simonton. Jackson, Mississippi, September 24, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to submit a report of the action and casualties of the brigade I commanded at the battle of Fort Donelson, on the fifteenth of February, 1862. I have been prevented from doing so sooner from the discourtesy of the Federal authorities either to allow me to make it to a superior officer in captivity with me (but in a different prison), or in any other way; and I now make this report to you direct, because I do not know the whereabouts of the proper division commanders, and from a desire to do justice to the gallant officers and men under my command upon the bloody field; also that the government may know who not only bravely met the invading foe, but shed their blood in the defence of the most holy cause for which freemen ever fought; and that their families, in after times, ma
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