hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 904 0 Browse Search
Henry Wilson 826 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 460 14 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 440 54 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 425 15 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 417 3 Browse Search
R. H. Anderson 375 3 Browse Search
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) 300 0 Browse Search
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) 297 1 Browse Search
James H. Lane 286 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 698 total hits in 121 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Jonathan A. Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 8
Doc. 8-the iron-clads at Charleston. Report of rear-admiral Dahlgren. flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, January 28, 1864. Sir: Conformably to the wishes of the department, I submit the following review of the services of the monitors while under my command; and as some knowledge of the circumstances under which they have been tested may afford a better appreciation of their qualities, I shall briefly narrate some of the leading events in which they have participated dure of business, which will, I hope, excuse such imperfections as may have inadvertently occurred. With more leisure I could do full justice to this interesting subject. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Sec. of Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report. flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, May 17, 1864. Sir: I find that several omissions have occurred in
New Orleans, including Wilmington, Charleston, Mobile, &c. Many defects of both classes are easily remediable, but some of those in the monitors could only be determined by the test of battle ; before that, approximation only was possible. What other style of vessel could the department have chosen? Certainly none that has been built by English or French naval authorities. The Warrior and her class are exceedingly powerful, but could not get within gunshot here. According to Rear-Admiral Paris, the French Gloria draws 28 feet; the British Warrior, 26 feet; the Black Prince, 23 1/2 fleet; even those of inferior class, Defence and Resistance, draw 24 feet. Not one of these vessels could cross the Charleston bar, and would be perfectly impotent to render the least service in any of the operations now being carried on. On the other hand, there is very little navigable water on this coast which is not accessible to the monitors. They command supremely all that is near the sh
Doc. 8-the iron-clads at Charleston. Report of rear-admiral Dahlgren. flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, January 28, 1864. Sir: Conformably to the wishes of the department, I submit the following review of the services of the monitors while under my command; and as some knowledge of the circumstances under which they have been tested may afford a better appreciation of their qualities, I shall briefly narrate some of the leading events in which they have participated during the operations at this place. On the sixth July Rear-Admiral Dupont delivered to me the command of the naval forces occupying the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and part of Florida. They embraced seventy (70) vessels of all classes, and were distributed at various points along an extent of more than three hundred miles. There was no concentration, the purpose being rather to distribute the vessels in order to enforce an efficient blockade. Of the iron-clads, the Ironsides was off
Gideon Welles (search for this): chapter 8
his interesting subject. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Sec. of Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report. flag-steamer Philadelphia, off Morris Island, May 17, 1864. Sir: I find that several omissioof my command very much. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, commanding S. A. B. Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Additional list of actions in which the iron-clads were engaged with the rebel batteries in Charleston harbor while reducing Morriring made to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren during the past nine months. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. Simpson, Lieutenant-Commander, commanding. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Statement of Firings by United States Iron-clad Passaic, Lieutenant-Commander E. Simpson. date.rounds fired.hits by enemy.dist
laught. It was a complete surprise, both as to time and to power developed. The monitors were run in as close as the shoal waters permitted, so that the shells from our own batteries on Folly Island passed close ahead of and at times over some of them. About eight o'clock a body of men were seen coming over the low sand beach of Morris Island, and while hesitating whether to treat them to some volleys of grape, the sight of the Union flag The first planted on Morris Island by Lieutenant Robeson. told who they were. They composed the brigade which had been brought from the Folly River by the boats of the squadron, under Lieutenant-Commander Bunce and Lieutenant Mackenzie. I paused for a moment to observe the gradual accumulation of our men in masses, and their advancing movement; then pushed forward to accelerate with our enfilading fire the retreat of the rebels. The sight was now of great interest. Our own troops could be seen taking possession of the sand hills wher
roper moment arrived. The obscurity of the night still rested on land and sea when I went on board the Catskill, (July tenth,) and not a symptom of preparation on shore was visible to us. It was important that the monitors should not by their appearance give any intimation of what was meditated by being seen on the bar until the details ashore were completed; so I waited the first fire of the batteries. This was not long coming, and I led with my flag in the Catskill, followed by Captains Fairfax, Downes, and Colhoun, in the Montauk, Nahant, and Weehawken. Steering for the wreck of the Keokuk, and passing it, the monitors were laid in line about parallel to the land, opposite the southern eminences of Morris Island, and poured in a steady fire among the rebel garrison, who were there posted, making a feeble and ineffectual return to the storm of shot and shell that came upon their front and flank. I could see plainly the great confusion into which they were thrown by this sudd
J. S. Bee (search for this): chapter 8
m Johnson towards the city; and thus an interior defence was completed which, though it separated more widely the salient and principal works of the defence, by substituting Johnson for Sumter, yet rendered access to the upper harbor far more difficult, because a more powerful fire was concentrated from additional batteries upon vessels attempting to enter. And thus it was that, even after Morris Island was evacuated and Sumter dismantled, the fleet must still pass the fire of Moultrie and Bee to find itself in presence of a formidable earthwork, supported by continuous batteries, and commanding obstructions more difficult than any between Sumter and Moultrie. The real nature of these obstructions was not suspected until the winter freshets had broken away and floated into our hands a fair specrmen of them, which were certainly far more formidable than had been anticipated. So well do the rebels keep their counsel that the best informed refugees, who had been constantly engag
John Dahlgren (search for this): chapter 8
dian to sundown. Sept. 7 Night attack on Moultrie.152241,200Fort MoultrieThese hits were from Sullivan's Island batteries; at anchor. Sept. 8483701,200Fort Moultrie Respectfully submitted, S. C. Rowan, Commodore, commanding. Report of Lieut.-Commander E. Simpson. United States iron-clad Passaic, off Morris Island, S. C., April 21, 1864. Sir: In the Army and Navy Journal, of the sixteenth instant, there is published a review of the service of the monitors, by Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren. As this review does not give this vessel credit for the service performed by her, I respectfully ask your attention to the subject, in order that the statement may be corrected at the Navy Department. On the twenty-ninth of July, 1863, this vessel went into action with Fort Wagner, followed by the Patapsco; the New Ironsides joined in the action also. The presence of the Passaic in this action is not mentioned in the review. On the thirty-first of August, 1863, the most s
ston bar, so as to cross at early daylight on the day named, to cover the attack of the troops, to prevent the arrival of reenforcements during that attack, and to engage the rebel batteries, particularly Fort Wagner. 2. To furnish a convoy for the column that was to ascend to Stono, cover its landing, and shell James's Island. 3. To guard the depots of the army at Hilton Head and at Seabrook during the withdrawal of the troops concentrated on Folly Island. I should here state that Mr. Ericsson had decided to increase the thicknesses of the pilot-houses of all the monitors, and add heavy circles of metal to the bases of the turrets and pilot-houses. The three at Port Royal were already in hand for this purpose, and some progress had been made. A part of my preparation consisted in putting a stop to the work, and having the vessels fitted temporarily for service. This was effected in season, and before daylight of the ninth of July the monitors were off the bar, ready to p
B. R. Johnson (search for this): chapter 8
rt into a powerful earthwork — improved by the experiences of Wagner. Moultrie received similar advantages, and most of the cannon of Sumter were divided between Johnson and Moultrie. Batteries were established along the south shore of the channel from Johnson towards the city; and thus an interior defence was completed which, thJohnson towards the city; and thus an interior defence was completed which, though it separated more widely the salient and principal works of the defence, by substituting Johnson for Sumter, yet rendered access to the upper harbor far more difficult, because a more powerful fire was concentrated from additional batteries upon vessels attempting to enter. And thus it was that, even after Morris Island wasJohnson for Sumter, yet rendered access to the upper harbor far more difficult, because a more powerful fire was concentrated from additional batteries upon vessels attempting to enter. And thus it was that, even after Morris Island was evacuated and Sumter dismantled, the fleet must still pass the fire of Moultrie and Bee to find itself in presence of a formidable earthwork, supported by continuous batteries, and commanding obstructions more difficult than any between Sumter and Moultrie. The real nature of these obstructions was not suspected until the winte
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...