hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 963 5 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 555 5 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 405 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 365 1 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 347 3 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 332 24 Browse Search
John Pope 308 2 Browse Search
Edwin V. Sumner 292 2 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 271 1 Browse Search
J. Hooker 241 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

Found 574 total hits in 146 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
, nor had I received any information of a purpose to change my position. President's War order, no. 3, executive Mansion, Washington, March 11, 1862. Maj.-Gen. McClellan having personally taken the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac, until otherwise ordered he is relieved from the command of the other military departments, he retaining command of the Department of the Potomac. Ordered, further, That the departments now under the respective commands of Gens. Halleck and Hunter, together with so much of that under Gen. Buell as lies west of a north and south line indefinitely drawn through Knoxville, Tennessee, be consolidated and designated the Department of the Mississippi; and that, until otherwise ordered, Maj.-Gen. Halleck have command of said department. Ordered, also, That the country west of the Department of the Potomac and east of the Department of the Mississippi be a military department to be called the Mountain Department, and that the same be comma
James S. Wadsworth (search for this): chapter 13
your friend, Geo. B. Mcclellan. While at Fairfax Court-House an order arrived assigning Gen. Wadsworth to the command of Washington. The secretary had spoken to me on the subject some days before, whereupon I objected to the selection for the reason that Gen. Wadsworth was not a soldier by training. I said that one of the very best soldiers in the army was necessary for the command of Washihould dislike sparing him, I would give up Franklin for the place. The secretary replied that Wadsworth had been selected because it was necessary, for political reasons, to conciliate the agricultu that it was useless to discuss the matter, because it would in no event be changed. When Gen. Wadsworth parted from me at Fairfax he professed the greatest devotion and friendship for me, but at otained about 134,000 for the defence of Washington, leaving me but 85,000 for operations. Gen. Wadsworth received clear instructions as to his duties. On the 4th of April the Valley of the Shenand
N. H. Davis (search for this): chapter 13
placed on the heights in the rear (concealed by the woods), and the arrangement of his troops is such that he can oppose some considerable resistance to a passage of that stream. Information has just been received to the effect that the enemy are entrenching a line of heights extending from the vicinity of Sangster's (Union Mills) towards Evansport. Early in January Spriggs's ford was occupied by General Rhodes with 3,600 men and eight (8) guns; there are strong reasons for believing that Davis's ford is occupied. These circumstances indicate or prove that the enemy anticipates the movement in question, and is prepared to resist it. Assuming for the present that this operation is determined upon, it may be well to examine briefly its probable progress. In the present state of affairs our column (for the movement of so large a force must be made in several columns, at least five or six) can reach the Accotink without danger; during the march thence to the Occoquan our right flank
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 13
Chapter 13: Evacuation of Manassas Army corps McClellan removed from chief command President's military orders 3, executive Mansion, Washington, March 11, 1862. Maj.-Gen. McClellan having personally taken the field at the head of theced towards me, I am, most sincerely your friend, Geo. B. Mcclellan. While at Fairfax Court-House an order arrived aur plan than mine? Yours truly, Abraham Lincoln. Maj.-Gen. McClellan. These questions were substantially answered by cretary of War Thomas A. Scott. I was informed that Maj.-Gen. McClellan wished to see me. From him I learned that he desiredn their judgment. A few days afterwards I reported to Gen. McClellan that I was entirely confident the transports could be I had the honor of an interview with the President and Gen. McClellan, when the subject was further discussed, and especiallrom the time the order was given. The President and Gen. McClellan both urgently stated the vast importance of an earlier
J. J. Abercrombie (search for this): chapter 13
On the 1st of April, in view of what had occurred meanwhile, I temporarily changed the arrangements to the extent of leaving Banks in the Shenandoah. I placed Abercrombie in command at Warrenton and Manassas, under Banks's general orders, with 7,780 men at the former and 10,859 men at the latter place, and 18,000 men in Washington so that if Abercrombie was obliged to retire upon Washington there would be concentrated there 36,639 men, besides 1,350 on the lower Potomac and 35,467 under Banks in the Shenandoah. In the event of an advance of the enemy in force in the Shenandoah Valley, Banks could have withdrawn to his aid at least 10,000 men from AbercrAbercrombie's command, or, in the reverse case, could hare gone to the latter's assistance with at least 30,000 men, leaving his Strasburg entrenchments well guarded. Had I remained in command I would have seen to it that the entrenchments referred to were promptly executed. To say that the force I left behind me was, under the circu
H. J. Hunt (search for this): chapter 13
chor. Artillery — transports ready at the wharves. March 21--Porter's artillery in Alexandria, but no sufficient accommodation for the horses and no arrangement of vessels for infantry and artillery. March 22--Porter's division moved off in splendid style and well provided; reached Fortress Monroe on the 23d. March 23--Only 150 horses fit for artillery in Alexandria depot; 300 expected next day. March 24--Many new regiments arriving from the North. No additional transportation. Hunt and Averill can embark./note> regarded a full garrison for Washington and 20,000 men for the Shenandoah as more than enough under existing circumstances. The instructions I gave on the 16th of March were to the effect that Manassas Junction should be strongly entrenched, using the enemy's works as far as possible, and that Gen. Banks should put the mass of his forces there, with grand guards at Warrenton or Warrenton Junction, and, if possible, as far out as the Rappahannock; the country t
D. C. Buell (search for this): chapter 13
under the respective commands of Gens. Halleck and Hunter, together with so much of that under Gen. Buell as lies west of a north and south line indefinitely drawn through Knoxville, Tennessee, be conwould be — Burnside forming our left; Norfolk held securely: our centre connecting Burnside with Buell, both by Raleigh and Lynchburg; Buell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama; Halleck at NashvilBuell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama; Halleck at Nashvilie and Memphis. The next movement would be to connect with Sherman on the left by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either toBuell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all ary of War. The same order which confined my command to the Department of the Potomac placed Buell under Halleck, and created the Mountain Department, extending from the western limits of the Dep
tools were loaded up. March 17 the leading division — Hamilton's — embarked. March 20 there were eight to ten horse-transports at the wharves of Alexandria and as many more at anchor. Artillery — transports ready at the wharves. March 21--Porter's artillery in Alexandria, but no sufficient accommodation for the horses and no arrangement of vessels for infantry and artillery. March 22--Porter's division moved off in splendid style and well provided; reached Fortress Monroe on the 23d. March 23--Only 150 horses fit for artillery in Alexandria depot; 300 expected next day. March 24--Many new regiments arriving from the North. No additional transportation. Hunt and Averill can embark./note> regarded a full garrison for Washington and 20,000 men for the Shenandoah as more than enough under existing circumstances. The instructions I gave on the 16th of March were to the effect that Manassas Junction should be strongly entrenched, using the enemy's works as far as po<
February 28th (search for this): chapter 13
ed upon. That evening the quartermaster-general was informed of the decision. Directions were given to secure the transportation; any assistance was tendered. He promptly detailed to this duty two most efficient assistants in his department. Col. Rufus Ingalis was stationed at Annapolis, where it was then proposed to embark the troops, and Capt. Henry C. Hodges was directed to meet me in Philadelphia to attend to chartering the vessels. With these arrangements I left Washington on the 28th Feb. I beg to hand herewith a statement, prepared by Capt. Hodges, of the vessels chartered, which exhibits the prices paid and parties from whom they were taken: 113steamers, at an average price per day,$215 10 188schooners, at an average price per day,24 45 88barges, at an average price per day,14 27 In thirty-seven days from the time I received the order in Washington (and most of it was accomplished in thirty days), these vessels transported from Perryville, Alexandria, and Was
January 17th (search for this): chapter 13
cipated. Finally, on the 27th of Feb., 1862, the Secretary of War, by the authority of the President, instructed Mr. John Tucker, Assistant Secretary of War, to procure at once the necessary steamers and sailing craft to transport the Army of the Potomac to its new field of operations. The following extract from the report of Mr. Tucker, dated April 5, will show the nature and progress of this well-executed service: . . . . . . . . I was called to Washington by telegraph, on 17th Jan. last, by Assistant Secretary of War Thomas A. Scott. I was informed that Maj.-Gen. McClellan wished to see me. From him I learned that he desired to know if transportation on smooth water could be obtained to move at one time, for a short distance, about 50,000 troops, 10,000 horses, 1,000 wagons, 13 batteries, and the usual equipment of such an army. He frankly stated to me that he had always supposed such a movement entirely feasible until two experienced quartermasters had recently re
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15