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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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uld not intend to return immediately, that they would never undertake the assault of the works around Washington, and that from the moment the operations by the lower Chesapeake were developed they would be tied down to the vicinity of Richmond so long as the Army of the Potomac remained anywhere near the James river. All they could attempt would be a raid in the Shenandoah. I therefore The following memoranda were found lying with the manuscript at this point: memoranda.--On the 5th of March there were no transports of importance at Annapolis, some at Perryville and Washington, and many engaged and fitting up in New York. On March 12 there were at Alexandria transports for 15,000 infantry and one squadron, but they were not coaled or ready to receive the troops. The pontoon trains and engineers' tools were loaded up. March 17 the leading division — Hamilton's — embarked. March 20 there were eight to ten horse-transports at the wharves of Alexandria and as many more
March 16th (search for this): chapter 13
lery. March 22--Porter's division moved off in splendid style and well provided; reached Fortress Monroe on the 23d. March 23--Only 150 horses fit for artillery in Alexandria depot; 300 expected next day. March 24--Many new regiments arriving from the North. No additional transportation. Hunt and Averill can embark./note> regarded a full garrison for Washington and 20,000 men for the Shenandoah as more than enough under existing circumstances. The instructions I gave on the 16th of March were to the effect that Manassas Junction should be strongly entrenched, using the enemy's works as far as possible, and that Gen. Banks should put the mass of his forces there, with grand guards at Warrenton or Warrenton Junction, and, if possible, as far out as the Rappahannock; the country to be thoroughly scouted by cavalry, the railway from Washington to Manassas and thence to Strasburg to be at once repaired and put in running order, all the bridges to be protected by block-houses;
March 17th (search for this): chapter 13
be a raid in the Shenandoah. I therefore The following memoranda were found lying with the manuscript at this point: memoranda.--On the 5th of March there were no transports of importance at Annapolis, some at Perryville and Washington, and many engaged and fitting up in New York. On March 12 there were at Alexandria transports for 15,000 infantry and one squadron, but they were not coaled or ready to receive the troops. The pontoon trains and engineers' tools were loaded up. March 17 the leading division — Hamilton's — embarked. March 20 there were eight to ten horse-transports at the wharves of Alexandria and as many more at anchor. Artillery — transports ready at the wharves. March 21--Porter's artillery in Alexandria, but no sufficient accommodation for the horses and no arrangement of vessels for infantry and artillery. March 22--Porter's division moved off in splendid style and well provided; reached Fortress Monroe on the 23d. March 23--Only 150 horse<
July 27th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 13
e would? 5th. In case of disaster would not a retreat be more difficult by your plan than mine? Yours truly, Abraham Lincoln. Maj.-Gen. McClellan. These questions were substantially answered by the following letter of the same date to the Secretary of War: headquarters of the Army, Washington, Feb. 3, 1862. Sir: I ask your indulgence for the following papers, rendered necessary by circumstances. I assumed command of the troops in the vicinity of Washington on Saturday, July 27, 1861, six days after the battle of Bull Run. I found no army to command — a mere collection of regiments cowering on the banks of the Potomac, some perfectly raw, others dispirited by the recent defeat. Nothing of any consequence had been done to secure the southern approaches to the capital by means of defensive works; nothing whatever had been undertaken to defend the avenues to the city on the northern side of the Potomac. The troops were not only undisciplined, undrilled, an
March 12th (search for this): chapter 13
ct upon operations in Virginia. Though unaware of the President's intention to remove me from the position of general-in-chief, I cheerfully acceded to the disposition he saw fit to make of my services, and so informed him in a note on the 12th of March: Unofficial. Fairfax Court-House, March 12, 1862. His Excellency A. Lincoln, President: my dear Sir: I have just seen Gov. Dennison, who has detailed to me the conversation he held with you yesterday and to-day. I beg to say that Ilowing memoranda were found lying with the manuscript at this point: memoranda.--On the 5th of March there were no transports of importance at Annapolis, some at Perryville and Washington, and many engaged and fitting up in New York. On March 12 there were at Alexandria transports for 15,000 infantry and one squadron, but they were not coaled or ready to receive the troops. The pontoon trains and engineers' tools were loaded up. March 17 the leading division — Hamilton's — embarked.
March 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 13
vered by an infantry force near Heathsville — then ferried over the Rappahannock and moved rapidly to unite with the force first landed. Prior to the evacuation of Yorktown the remaining portions of the army would have been landed at Urbana, and, subsequently to that, at West Point or on the James, as circumstances required. As soon as the leading divisions of infantry crossed the Pamunkey they would have moved on Richmond, covered by cavalry on both flanks. My letters of Feb. 3 and March 19, 1862, to the Secretary of War, show that, under certain circumstances, I contemplated crossing the James river and attacking Richmond from the south. The fears of the administration and their inability to comprehend the merits of the scheme, or else the determination that I should not succeed in the approaching campaign, induced them to prohibit me from carrying out the Urbana movement. They gave me the choice between the direct overland route via Manassas, and the route with Fort Monroe
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