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t. It was evident that to await any considerable accession of force and transportation would involve a delay of many days; I therefore determined to advance on the 4th of April. The following telegram of April 3 to Mr. Stanton requires no explanation: I expect to move from here to-morrow morning on Yorktown, where a force of some 15,000 of the rebels are in an entrenched position, and I think it quite probable they will attempt to resist us. No appearance of the Merrimac as yet. Commodore Golds-borough is quite confident he can sink her when she comes out. Before I left Washington an order had been issued by the War Department placing Fort Monroe and its dependencies under my control, and authorizing me to draw from the troops under Gen. Wool a division of about 10,000 men, which was to be assigned to the 1st corps. During the night of the 3d I received a telegram from the adjutant-general of the army stating that, by the President's order, I was deprived of all control
Irwin McDowell (search for this): chapter 15
never the state of affairs promised the best results. A few hours after I had determined to act upon this determination McDowell telegraphed me from Washington, suggesting that the troops should be embarked by divisions: according to convenience, ining the arrival of sufficient transports to move his whole corps. Soon after this I was more than once informed that Gen. McDowell and others in Washington had instanced this decision to embark the troops by divisions as a proof that I had disobeyeaged, being myself with Porter's division, that I received the telegram informing me of the withdrawal of the 1st corps (McDowell's) from my command: adjutant-general's office, April 4, 1862. Gen. McClellan: By directions of the President Ge 4, 1862. Gen. McClellan: By directions of the President Gen. McDowell's army corps has been detached from the force under your immediate command, and the general is ordered to report to the Secretary of War; letter by mail. L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen.
E. M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 15
Chapter 15: The Peninsular campaign Landing at Fortress Monroe that place removed from his command Secretary Stanton stops all recruiting advance on Richmond columns under fire first corps withdrawn from the army. In the coursee a delay of many days; I therefore determined to advance on the 4th of April. The following telegram of April 3 to Mr. Stanton requires no explanation: I expect to move from here to-morrow morning on Yorktown, where a force of some 15,000 ofher a desire for the failure of the campaign or entire incompetence. Between the horns of this dilemma the friends of Mr. Stanton must take their choice. During the preceding autumn I advocated a system of drafting, but was not listened to. Had absurdly and recklessly managed than the whole system of recruiting, drafting, and organization under the regime of Secretary Stanton. When his actions are coolly criticised, apart from the influence of party feeling, his administration will be reg
I. B. Richardson (search for this): chapter 15
, and gave not the slightest indication that he thought he could take or invest Yorktown. On the 3d of April there were of my command in the vicinity of Fort Monroe the 3d Penn. Cavalry, the 2d, 5th, and a part of the 1st U. S. Cavalry, a part of the reserve artillery, two divisions each of the 3d and 4th corps ready to move, one division of the 2d corps, Sykes's brigade of U. S. Infantry. Casey's division of the 4th corps was at Newport News, but totally unprovided with transportation. Richardson's division of the 2d corps and Hooker's of the 3d had not yet arrived. The troops ready to advance numbered about 53,000 men and 100 guns-less than 45,000 effectives. The amount of wagon-transportation arrived was altogether insufficient for a long movement, and it became necessary to advance in order to establish new depots on the shore more to the front. It was evident that to await any considerable accession of force and transportation would involve a delay of many days; I therefore
J. Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 15
two years, and at least tripled its cost in blood and treasure. The movement was made by the two roads already mentioned: the two divisions of the 4th corps from Newport News via Warwick Court-House; the two divisions of the 3d, supported by Sedgwick's division of the 2d corps, Sykes's brigade, and the reserve artillery, by the road from Hampton and Big Bethel to Yorktown. The advance on Big Bethel would turn the works at Young's Mill and open the way for the 4th corps; while, in turn, the tion of roads about two and three-quarter miles from Yorktown, there to halt and send out reconnoitring parties, to cover the reconnoissances of the engineer officers, etc. Hamilton's division to move at the same hour and close up on Porter. Sedgwick, temporarily attached to headquarters, to move with the reserves to Dr. Pavis's house, where the road to Lee's Mill diverged, and there await orders. If Heintzelman found it possible to assault the works at Yorktown immediately, the reserves
W. W. Averill (search for this): chapter 15
's bridge and Ship Point, and open the road of the right column to the immediate vicinity of Yorktown. Smith's division (4th corps) encamped on the 4th of April at Young's Mill, with one brigade in advance on the road from Big Bethel to Warwick; Couch's division on Fisher's creek. Porter, on the same day, occupied Cockletown with Morell's division and a battery, his pickets a mile in advance near Pavis's house; the other brigades of the division less than two miles in rear of Morell. Averill's cavalry found the Ship Point batteries abandoned. They were strong and well constructed, with deep wet ditches; they had platforms and magazine for siege-guns, all the guns withdrawn; there were excellent quarters for three regiments of ten companies each. Hamilton's division encamped about two miles in rear of Howard's creek. The reserve cavalry, artillery, and infantry bivouacked with headquarters at Big Bethel. Gen. Heintzelman learned during the evening that there were no batterie
hore more to the front. It was evident that to await any considerable accession of force and transportation would involve a delay of many days; I therefore determined to advance on the 4th of April. The following telegram of April 3 to Mr. Stanton requires no explanation: I expect to move from here to-morrow morning on Yorktown, where a force of some 15,000 of the rebels are in an entrenched position, and I think it quite probable they will attempt to resist us. No appearance of the Merrimac as yet. Commodore Golds-borough is quite confident he can sink her when she comes out. Before I left Washington an order had been issued by the War Department placing Fort Monroe and its dependencies under my control, and authorizing me to draw from the troops under Gen. Wool a division of about 10,000 men, which was to be assigned to the 1st corps. During the night of the 3d I received a telegram from the adjutant-general of the army stating that, by the President's order, I was dep
F. J. Porter (search for this): chapter 15
ailed on the 17th of March; it was followed by Gen. F. J. Porter's division of the same corps on the 22d of March. Gen. Heintzelman accompanied Porter's division, and was instructed to get his corps in condition for an adbe intended against Norfolk. On the 27th he sent Porter towards Big Bethel and Howard's bridge, and Smith towards Young's Mill, on the James river road. Porter occupied Big Bethel and pushed one brigade four miles to Warwick; Couch's division on Fisher's creek. Porter, on the same day, occupied Cockletown with Morell'sng the evening that there were no batteries between Porter and Yorktown; that Yorktown was strongly fortified;pe or reinforcement of the garrison of Yorktown. Porter's division to close up on its advanced guard at sixs division to move at the same hour and close up on Porter. Sedgwick, temporarily attached to headquarters, trmishers of the 3d corps engaged, being myself with Porter's division, that I received the telegram informing
G. W. Morell (search for this): chapter 15
f Yorktown. Smith's division (4th corps) encamped on the 4th of April at Young's Mill, with one brigade in advance on the road from Big Bethel to Warwick; Couch's division on Fisher's creek. Porter, on the same day, occupied Cockletown with Morell's division and a battery, his pickets a mile in advance near Pavis's house; the other brigades of the division less than two miles in rear of Morell. Averill's cavalry found the Ship Point batteries abandoned. They were strong and well construcMorell. Averill's cavalry found the Ship Point batteries abandoned. They were strong and well constructed, with deep wet ditches; they had platforms and magazine for siege-guns, all the guns withdrawn; there were excellent quarters for three regiments of ten companies each. Hamilton's division encamped about two miles in rear of Howard's creek. The reserve cavalry, artillery, and infantry bivouacked with headquarters at Big Bethel. Gen. Heintzelman learned during the evening that there were no batteries between Porter and Yorktown; that Yorktown was strongly fortified; that its garrison until
S. P. Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 15
rst division which had embarked was Hamilton's, formerly Heintzelman's, of the 3d corps, which sailed on the 17th of March; iter's division of the same corps on the 22d of March. Gen. Heintzelman accompanied Porter's division, and was instructed to ned to their camps after completing the reconnoissance. Heintzelman reported that, from the best information, Magruder had finfantry bivouacked with headquarters at Big Bethel. Gen. Heintzelman learned during the evening that there were no batterireinforcements were said to have come from Richmond. Gen. Heintzelman concluded that the enemy had no idea of abandoning Yoad to Lee's Mill diverged, and there await orders. If Heintzelman found it possible to assault the works at Yorktown immedave gone to his support with all the reserves and one of Heintzelman's divisions, thus holding the key-point of the operationion, forage, and provision trains could be brought. up. Heintzelman early in the day came under the artillery-fire of the wo
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