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ellows brightened up when they saw me. . . . I wonder whether the baby will know me. I fear that she will be afraid of me and won't come to me. Would not that be mortifying? I hope the dear little thing will take to me kindly. I should feel terribly if she should refuse to have anything to do with me. Bless her sweet little ladyship! She must be a great comfort to you; and we will be happier than any kings and queens on earth, if we three are permitted to be together again, and that before May changes much. I want so much to see her again while she is a baby, before she begins to talk and walk and be human. . . . P. M. Which despatch of mine to Stanton do you allude to? The telegraphic one in which I told him that if I saved the Army I owed no thanks to any one in Washington, and that he had done his best to sacrifice my army? It was pretty frank and quite true. Of course they will never forgive me for that. I knew it when I wrote it; but as I thought it possible that i
ill be a great stampede, but do not be alarmed. There will be severe fighting in a day or two, but you may be sure that your husband will not disgrace you, and I am confident that God will smile upon my efforts and give our arms success. You will hear that we are pursued, annihilated, etc. Do not believe it, but trust that success will crown our efforts. I tell you this, darling, only to guard against the agony you would feel if you trusted the newspaper reports. . . . Telegram--June 27, 1.15 P. M.--Heavy firing in all directions. So far we have repulsed them everywhere. I expect wire to be cut any moment. All well and very busy. Cannot write to-day. Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 27.--Have had a terrible fight against vastly superior numbers. Have generally held our own, and we may thank God that the Army of the Potomac has not lost its honor. It is impossible as yet to tell what the result is. I am well, but tired out; no sleep for two nights, and none to-ni
Chapter 27: private letters. [ June 26 to Aug. 23, 1862.] June 26, 2 P. M., Trent's. . . Yesterday I wished to advance our picket-line, and met with a good deal of opposition. We succeeded fully, however, and gained the point with but little loss. The enemy fought pretty hard, but our men did better. I was out there all day taking a personal direction of affairs, and remained until about 5.30 P. M., when I returned to camp, and met on my way the news that Stonewall Jackson was on June 26, 2 P. M., Trent's. . . Yesterday I wished to advance our picket-line, and met with a good deal of opposition. We succeeded fully, however, and gained the point with but little loss. The enemy fought pretty hard, but our men did better. I was out there all day taking a personal direction of affairs, and remained until about 5.30 P. M., when I returned to camp, and met on my way the news that Stonewall Jackson was on his way to attack my right and rear. I rode over to Porter's soon after I reached camp, and returned about 2.30 A. M. At three I started off again and went to the front, where an attack was expected by some. Finding all quiet, I rode all along the lines and returned here. You may imagine that I am rather tired out. I think that Jackson will attempt to attack our rear. . . . Have just received the positive information that Jackson is en route to take us in rear. You probably will not hear
will hear that we are pursued, annihilated, etc. Do not believe it, but trust that success will crown our efforts. I tell you this, darling, only to guard against the agony you would feel if you trusted the newspaper reports. . . . Telegram--June 27, 1.15 P. M.--Heavy firing in all directions. So far we have repulsed them everywhere. I expect wire to be cut any moment. All well and very busy. Cannot write to-day. Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 27.--Have had a terrible fightJune 27.--Have had a terrible fight against vastly superior numbers. Have generally held our own, and we may thank God that the Army of the Potomac has not lost its honor. It is impossible as yet to tell what the result is. I am well, but tired out; no sleep for two nights, and none to-night. God bless you! Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 28.--We are all well to-night. I fear your uncle has been seriously hurt in the terrible tight of yesterday. They have outnumbered us everywhere, but we have not lost our honor
lsed them everywhere. I expect wire to be cut any moment. All well and very busy. Cannot write to-day. Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 27.--Have had a terrible fight against vastly superior numbers. Have generally held our own, and we may thank God that the Army of the Potomac has not lost its honor. It is impossible as yet to tell what the result is. I am well, but tired out; no sleep for two nights, and none to-night. God bless you! Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 28.--We are all well to-night. I fear your uncle has been seriously hurt in the terrible tight of yesterday. They have outnumbered us everywhere, but we have not lost our honor. This army has acted magnificently. I thank my friends in Washington for our repulse. June 29, 3 P. M., in the field. I send you only a line to say that I still think God is with us. We have fought a terrible battle against overwhelming numbers. We held our own, and history will show that I have done all that
rmy of the Potomac has not lost its honor. It is impossible as yet to tell what the result is. I am well, but tired out; no sleep for two nights, and none to-night. God bless you! Telegram--McClellan's Headquarters, June 28.--We are all well to-night. I fear your uncle has been seriously hurt in the terrible tight of yesterday. They have outnumbered us everywhere, but we have not lost our honor. This army has acted magnificently. I thank my friends in Washington for our repulse. June 29, 3 P. M., in the field. I send you only a line to say that I still think God is with us. We have fought a terrible battle against overwhelming numbers. We held our own, and history will show that I have done all that man can do. . . . June 30, 7 P. M., Turkey bridge. Well, but worn out; no sleep for many days. We have been fighting for many days, and are still at it. . . . We have fought every day for five days. . . . July 1, Haxall's plantation. . . . The whole army is he
night. I fear your uncle has been seriously hurt in the terrible tight of yesterday. They have outnumbered us everywhere, but we have not lost our honor. This army has acted magnificently. I thank my friends in Washington for our repulse. June 29, 3 P. M., in the field. I send you only a line to say that I still think God is with us. We have fought a terrible battle against overwhelming numbers. We held our own, and history will show that I have done all that man can do. . . . June 30, 7 P. M., Turkey bridge. Well, but worn out; no sleep for many days. We have been fighting for many days, and are still at it. . . . We have fought every day for five days. . . . July 1, Haxall's plantation. . . . The whole army is here; worn out and war-worn, after a week of daily battles. I have still very great confidence in them, and they in me. The dear fellows cheer me as of old as they march to certain death, and I feel prouder of them than ever. July 2, . . . Berkley,
red to-day at noon from the camp of each corps. I have some more official letters to write, so I must close this, and must soon start to ride around the lines. July--, Monday, 7.30 A. M.--I have had a good, refreshing night's sleep. . . . We are to have another very hot day; it is already apparent. I am writing in my shirt-slwas exceedingly disgusted, and has, I presume, by this time come to the conclusion that the fact of being an Englishman is not everywhere a sufficient passport. July 17 A. M. Gens. Dix and Burnside are both here. . . . Burnside is very well, and, if the President permits, will bring me large (respectably) reinforcements. . this matter. Please regard this as confidential, except with Mr. Alsop and Mr. Bartlett. I am, my dear sir, most sincerely your friend, Geo. B. Mcclellan. July 20 A. M. . . . Went on the hospital-steamer to see Clitz yesterday. He is doing very well. . . . I saw all the officers and men on board, and tried to cheer t
thank my friends in Washington for our repulse. June 29, 3 P. M., in the field. I send you only a line to say that I still think God is with us. We have fought a terrible battle against overwhelming numbers. We held our own, and history will show that I have done all that man can do. . . . June 30, 7 P. M., Turkey bridge. Well, but worn out; no sleep for many days. We have been fighting for many days, and are still at it. . . . We have fought every day for five days. . . . July 1, Haxall's plantation. . . . The whole army is here; worn out and war-worn, after a week of daily battles. I have still very great confidence in them, and they in me. The dear fellows cheer me as of old as they march to certain death, and I feel prouder of them than ever. July 2, . . . Berkley, James river. . . . I have only energy enough left to scrawl you a few lines to say that I have the whole army here, with all its material and guns. We are all worn out and haggard. . . . My
he whole army is here; worn out and war-worn, after a week of daily battles. I have still very great confidence in them, and they in me. The dear fellows cheer me as of old as they march to certain death, and I feel prouder of them than ever. July 2, . . . Berkley, James river. . . . I have only energy enough left to scrawl you a few lines to say that I have the whole army here, with all its material and guns. We are all worn out and haggard. . . . My men need repose, and I hope will be allowed to enjoy it to-morrow. . . . Your poor uncle was killed at the battle of Gaines's Mills on Friday last. We are well, but very tired. . . . July 2, 11 P. M. I will now take a few moments from the rest which I really need, and write at least a few words. . . . We have had a terrible time. On Wednesday the serious work commenced. I commenced driving the enemy on our left, and, by hard fighting, gained my point. Before that affair was over I received news that Jackson was proba
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