hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 963 5 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 555 5 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 405 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 365 1 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 347 3 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 332 24 Browse Search
John Pope 308 2 Browse Search
Edwin V. Sumner 292 2 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 271 1 Browse Search
J. Hooker 241 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

Found 172 total hits in 69 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
that everything requires success in first operations. You need not be at all alarmed as to the result; God is on our side. This is a beautiful country in which we now are — a lovely valley surrounded by mountains, well cultivated. The people hail our parties as deliverers wherever they go, and we meet with perfect ovations. Yesterday was very hot, and my head almost roasted as I stood bareheaded while the troops passed by in review. We have a nice little camp of our own here: Mack's and Steele's companies, Howe's battery next, two companies of cavalry, and two well-behaved Virginia companies. When we next go into camp we shall have the German regiment (9th Ohio) with us in camp. I intend having a picked brigade with me all the time.--'s regiment is on the march up from Clarksburg; they signalized their entrance into the country by breaking into and robbing a grocery-store at Webster! The Guthrie Grays are at Philippi; they leave there to-day, and will be here to-morrow night, f
Dan Webster (search for this): chapter 3
ded while the troops passed by in review. We have a nice little camp of our own here: Mack's and Steele's companies, Howe's battery next, two companies of cavalry, and two well-behaved Virginia companies. When we next go into camp we shall have the German regiment (9th Ohio) with us in camp. I intend having a picked brigade with me all the time.--'s regiment is on the march up from Clarksburg; they signalized their entrance into the country by breaking into and robbing a grocery-store at Webster! The Guthrie Grays are at Philippi; they leave there to-day, and will be here to-morrow night, following us up in reserve, or perhaps overtaking us before we meet the enemy. . . . Buckhannon, July 7, 1861. I have been obliged to inflict some severe punishments, and I presume the papers of the Western Reserve will be hard down on me for disgracing some of their friends guilty of the small crime of burglary. I believe the army is beginning to comprehend that they have a master over t
sburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Bar B. has represented a personal interview as an official treaty . . . . Captain Howe is at Clarksburg-Guentler with him. Mack is here with us. . . . I don't know exactly when I shall be able to leave here; certainly not before to-morrow, and perhap the course of an hour or two to get to Clarksburg — will probably march twelve miles thence to-day — with Howe's battery, Mack's and the Chicago companies, and one company of cavalry. I shall have a telegraph line built to follow us up. Look on thead almost roasted as I stood bareheaded while the troops passed by in review. We have a nice little camp of our own here: Mack's and Steele's companies, Howe's battery next, two companies of cavalry, and two well-behaved Virginia companies. When we
R. S. Garnett (search for this): chapter 3
ollow next day. The large supply-train up and ready to move. Brig.-Gen. Garnett in command of enemy. July 10, Roaring creek. We have oetc. Pegram was in command. We lost but 10 killed and 35 wounded. Garnett has abandoned his camp between this and Philippi, and is in full rier arrived with the news that the troops I had sent in pursuit of Garnett had caught him, routed his army, captured his baggage, one gun, taken several prisoners, and that Garnett himself lay dead on the field of battle! Such is the fate of traitors: one of their leaders a prison hear in a few hours of the final extermination of the remnants of Garnett's army. Then I am almost hourly awaiting news of Cox's success int some delay will ensue. . . . Telegram--July 15, Hutonsville.--Garnett and whole concern have retreated. None nearer than Staunton. Cro loss on our side! We found yesterday some more guns abandoned by Garnett, bringing the number taken up to nine. . . Gen. Cox has been badly
ached here about three in the morning, and at once went on board the boat, where I got about three hours sleep until we reached Parkersburg. I have been hard at work all day, for I found everything in great confusion. Came up here in a boat about an hour ago, and shall go back to Parkersburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five additional regiments at Grafton to-morrow afternoon. I shall have some eighteen regiments two batteries, two companies of cavalry at my disposal — enough to thrash anything I find. I think the danger has been greatly exaggerated, and anticipate little or no chance of winning laurels. . . . A terrible storm is passing over us now; thunder and lightning terrible in
t or hung; that may convince some of the particular individuals concerned that they are not in the right track exactly. . . I have not told you about our camp at this place. It is in a large grass-field on a hill a little out of town, a beautiful grove near by. Your father and I share the same tent, a very large round one, pitched under a tree. Seth has one near by — an office; Lawrence Williams another as office and mess-tent. Marcy, the two Williamses, Judge Key, and Lander mess with me. Poe and the rest of the youngsters are in tents near by. . . . I had a very complimentary despatch from Gen. Scott last night. He said he was charmed with my energy, movements, and success. Pretty well for the old man. I hope to deserve more of him in the future. Move at six to-morrow morning to overtake advanced guard, which consists of three regiments, a battery, and one company of cavalry. I take up headquarters escort and four regiments infantry; three more follow next day. The large su
plenty of bouquets and kind words. . . . We nearly froze to death last night. I retired, as I thought, at about midnight, intending to have a good night's sleep. About half an hour after I shut up my tent a colonel in command of a detachment some fifteen miles distant came to report, so I received him in bed, and fell asleep about six times during the three hours I was talking with him. Finally, however, he left, and I alternately slept and froze until seven o'clock. This morning I sent Bates on an expedition and raked up a couple of horse-blankets, by the aid of which I hope hereafter to be reasonably comfortable. I hope to get the trains up to-morrow and make a final start during the day. We have a good many to deal with. I ordered the Guthrie Grays to Philippi this P. M. to resist a stampede attack that Gen. Morris feared. Buckhannon, July 5, 1861. . . . Yesterday was a very busy day with me, reviewing troops all the morning and giving orders all day and pretty much
and at once went on board the boat, where I got about three hours sleep until we reached Parkersburg. I have been hard at work all day, for I found everything in great confusion. Came up here in a boat about an hour ago, and shall go back to Parkersburg in two or three hours. . . We start from Parkersburg at six in the morning. With me go McCook's regiment (9th Ohio), Mack's company (4th U. S. Artillery), the Sturgess Rifle Co., a battery of six guns (Loomis's), and one company of cavalry (Barker's Illinois). Two Indiana regiments leave in the morning just after us. I shall have five additional regiments at Grafton to-morrow afternoon. I shall have some eighteen regiments two batteries, two companies of cavalry at my disposal — enough to thrash anything I find. I think the danger has been greatly exaggerated, and anticipate little or no chance of winning laurels. . . . A terrible storm is passing over us now; thunder and lightning terrible in the extreme. . . . Grafton, Sunday,
Irwin McDowell (search for this): chapter 3
dedly flattering to me. I received from him yesterday a despatch beginning, Your suggestion in respect to Staunton would be admirable, like your other conceptions and acts. I value that old man's praise very highly, and wrote him a short note last night telling him so. I enclose some scraps clipped off a dirty rebel flag captured at Rich Mountain. . . . Am engaged now in arranging to march home the three-months men to be reorganized, and in clearing up matters generally. . . . I suppose McDowell drove the enemy from Manassas Junction yesterday; if so the way will be pretty well cleared for the present. If any decided movement is made towards Richmond I shall feel sure that they cannot intend to trouble my people here. July 21, Beverly. . . . Were you satisfied with the result? Nine guns taken, twelve colors, lots of prisoners, and all this done with so little loss on our side! We found yesterday some more guns abandoned by Garnett, bringing the number taken up to nine. . .
John M. Douglass (search for this): chapter 3
Clarksburg — will probably march twelve miles thence to-day — with Howe's battery, Mack's and the Chicago companies, and one company of cavalry. I shall have a telegraph line built to follow us up. Look on the maps and find Buckhannon and Beverly; that is the direction of my march. I hope to thrash the infamous scamps before a week is over. All I fear is that I won't catch them. . . . What a strange performance that of Buckner's was! Fortunately I have secured the testimony of Gill and Douglass (present at the Cairo interview) that Buckner has entirely misrepresented me. It has annoyed me much, but I hope to do such work here as will set criticism at defiance. . . . Clarksburg, June 30. . . . Again great delays here; will certainly get off by four A. M. to-morrow, and make a long march, probably twenty-eight miles. After the next march I shall have a large tent, borrowed from the Chicago Rifles; your father and I will take that, make it reception-room, sleeping-apartment, m
1 2 3 4 5 6 7