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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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ndoned Maryland Heights his little army was in reality relieved by Gens. Franklin's and Sumner's corps at Crampton's Gap, within seven miles of his position. The corps of Gens. Franklin and Sumner were a part of the army which I at that time had the honor to command, and they were acting under my orders at Crampton's Gap and elsewhere; and if, as the commission states, Col. Ford's little army was in reality relieved by those officers, it was relieved by me. I had, on the morning of the 10th, sent the following despatch in relation to the command at Harper's Ferry to Gen. Halleck: Sept. 10, 9.45 A. M. Col. Miles is at or near Harper's Ferry, as I understand, with 9,000 troops. He can do nothing where he is, but could be of great service if ordered to join me. I suggest that he be ordered to join me by the most practicable route. To this I received the following reply from Gen. Halleck: There is no way for Col. Miles to join you at present; his only chance is t
September 15th (search for this): chapter 33
drawn from Maryland Heights, and within six miles of Harper's Ferry. On the night of the 14th the following despatch was sent to Gen. Franklin: Bolivar, Sept. 15, 1 A. M. general: The commanding general directs that you occupy with your command the road from Rohrersville to Harper's Ferry, placing a sufficient force atn. Franklin. On the 15th the following were received from Gen. Franklin: At the foot of the mountain in Pleasant Valley, three miles from Rohrersville, Sept. 15, 8.50 A. M. general: My command started at daylight this morning, and I am waiting to have it closed up here. Gen. Couch arrived about ten o'clock last nightiring makes me fear that it has — it is my opinion that I should be strongly reinforced. W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Commanding 6th. Corps. Gen. G. B. McClellan. Sept. 15, 11 A. M. general: I have received your despatch by Capt. O'Keefe. The enemy is in large force in my front, in two lines of battle stretching across the vall
mpt; said that everything was all right as it was; that my views were entirely erroneous, etc., and soon bowed us out, leaving matters at Harper's Ferry precisely as they were. On Sept. 5 the 2d and 12th corps were moved to Rockville, and Couch's division (the only one of the 4th corps that had been brought from the Peninsula) to Offutt's cross-roads. On the 6th the 1st and 9th corps were ordered to Leesburg; the 6th corps and Sykes's division of the 5th corps to Tennallytown. On the 7th the 6th corps was advanced to Rockville, to which place my headquarters were moved on the same day. All the necessary arrangements for the defence of the city under the new condition of things had been made, and Gen. Banks was left in command, having received his instructions from me. As the time had now arrived for the army to advance, and I had received no orders to take command of it, but had been expressly told that the assignment of a commander had not been decided, I determined to
his request, I said to Halleck precisely what I had stated to Mr. Seward. Halleck received my statement with ill-concealed contempt; said that everything was all right as it was; that my views were entirely erroneous, etc., and soon bowed us out, leaving matters at Harper's Ferry precisely as they were. On Sept. 5 the 2d and 12th corps were moved to Rockville, and Couch's division (the only one of the 4th corps that had been brought from the Peninsula) to Offutt's cross-roads. On the 6th the 1st and 9th corps were ordered to Leesburg; the 6th corps and Sykes's division of the 5th corps to Tennallytown. On the 7th the 6th corps was advanced to Rockville, to which place my headquarters were moved on the same day. All the necessary arrangements for the defence of the city under the new condition of things had been made, and Gen. Banks was left in command, having received his instructions from me. As the time had now arrived for the army to advance, and I had received no
September 2nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
on, save Baltimore and Washington, and throw him back across the Potomac. Nothing but sheer necessity justified the advance of the Army of the Potomac to South Mountain and Antietam in its then condition, and it is to the eternal honor of the brave men who composed it that under such adverse circumstances they gained those victories; for the work of supply and reorganization was continued The Army of Virginia, which had been under the command of Gen. Pope, ceased to exist on the 2d of Sept., 1862, by force of circumstances, and, so far as appears, without any order issued. The following correspondence is the only known record: Arlington. Sept. 5, 12.05 P. M. Maj.-Gen. Halleck, Gen.-in-Chief: I have just received an order from Gen. McClellan to have my command in readiness to march with three days rations, and further details of the march. What is my command, and where is it? McClellan has scattered it about in all directions, and has not informed me of the position o
s surrenders Franklin's victory at Crampton's Gap. Next day I rode to the front of Alexandria, and was engaged in rectifying the positions of the troops and giving orders necessary to secure the issuing of the necessary supplies, etc. On the 3d the enemy had disappeared from the front of Washington, and the information which I received induced me to believe that he intended to cross the upper Potomac into Maryland. This materially changed the aspect of affairs and enlarged the sphere of operations; for, in case of a crossing in force, an active campaign would be necessary to cover Baltimore, prevent the invasion of Pennsylvania, and clear Maryland. I therefore, on the 3d, ordered the 2d and 12th corps to Tennallytown, and the 9th corps to a point on the Seventh street road near Washington, and sent such cavalry as was available to the fords near Poolesville, to watch and impede the enemy in any attempt to cross in that vicinity. As soon as this was done I reported the fac
September 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
nown record: Arlington. Sept. 5, 12.05 P. M. Maj.-Gen. Halleck, Gen.-in-Chief: I have just received an order from Gen. McClellan to have my command in readiness to march with three days rations, and further details of the march. What is my command, and where is it? McClellan has scattered it about in all directions, and has not informed me of the position of a single regiment. Am I to take the field, and under McClellan's orders? Jno. Pope, Maj.-Gen. Washington D. C., Sept. 5, 1862. Maj.-Gen. Pope, Arlington. The armies of the Potomac and Virginia being consolidated, you will report for orders to the Secretary of War. H. W. Halleck, Gen.-in-chief. as best we might while on the march, and after the close of the battles so much remained to be done to place the army in condition for a campaign that the delay which ensued was absolutely unavoidable, and the army could not have entered upon a new campaign one day earlier than it did. The purpose of advancing fro
September 13th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
the Maryland Heights with your whole force. If you can do that I will certainly be able to relieve you. As the Catoctin valley is in our possession, you can safely cross the river at Berlin or its vicinity, so far as opposition on this side of the river is concerned. Hold out to the last. George B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Col. D. S. Miles. On the previous day I had sent Gen. Franklin the following instructions: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp near Frederick, Sept. 13, 1862, 6.20 P. M. general: I have now full information as to movements and intentions of the enemy. Jackson has crossed the upper Potomac to capture the garrison at Martinsburg and cut off Miles's retreat towards the west. A division on the south side of the Potomac was to carry Loudon Heights and cut off his retreat in that direction. McLaws, with his own command and the division of R. H. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal o
September 14th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 33
e same afternoon I wrote the following letter to Col. Miles, and despatched three copies by three different couriers on different routes. I did not, however, learn that any of these men succeeded in reaching Harper's Ferry: Middletown, Sept. 14, 1862. colonel: The army is being rapidly concentrated here. We are now attacking the pass on the Hagerstown road over the Blue Ridge. A column is about attacking the Burkittsville and Boonsborough Pass. You may count on our making every effod the utmost activity that a general can exercise. Geo. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. W. B. Franklin, Commanding 6th Corps. Again, on the 14th, I sent him the following: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Frederick, Sept. 14, 1862, 2 P. M. Your despatch of 12.30 just received. Send back to hurry up Couch. Mass your troops and carry Burkittsville at any cost. We shall have strong opposition at both passes. As fast as the troops come up I will hold a reserve in re
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