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rp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possible. Without waiting for the whole of that division to join, you will move at daybreak in the morning by Jefferson and Burkittsville upon the road to Rohrersville. I have reliable information that the mountain-pass by this road is practicable for artillery and wagons. If this pass is not occupied by the enemy in force, seize it as soon as practicable, and debouch upon Rohrersville in order to cut off the retreat of or destroy McLaws's command. If you find this pass held by the enemy in large force, make all your dispositions for the attack and commence it about half an hour after you hear severe fir
If the main force of the enemy is in your front, more troops can be spared from here. I remark that the original despatch, as received by me from the telegraph operator, is in the words quoted above: I think the main force of the enemy, etc. In accordance with this suggestion I asked, on the same day, that all the troops that could be spared should at once be sent to reinforce me ; but none came. On the 12th I received the following telegram from his Excellency the President: Governor Curtin telegraphs me: I have advices that Jackson is crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, and probably the whole rebel army will be drawn from Maryland. The President adds: Receiving nothing from Harper's Ferry or Martinsburg to-day, and positive information from Wheeling that the line is cut, corroborates the idea that the enemy is recrossing the Potomac. Please do not let him get off without being hurt. On the 13th Gen. Halleck telegraphed as follows: Until you know more certainly the
W. B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 33
gton. The 6th corps, under the command of Gen. Franklin, moved to Buckeystown via Darnestown, Dawshis little army was in reality relieved by Gens. Franklin's and Sumner's corps at Crampton's Gap, wi Miles. On the previous day I had sent Gen. Franklin the following instructions: headquarrge B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Franklin. Gen. Franklin pushed his corps rapihis brilliant action. It was conducted by Gen. Franklin in all its details. These details are givt officers and men engaged. The loss in Gen. Franklin's corps was 115 killed, 416 wounded, and 2any effect. The close of the action found Gen. Franklin's advance in Pleasant Valley on the night he 14th the following despatch was sent to Gen. Franklin: Bolivar, Sept. 15, 1 A. M. general:ellan. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and A. B. C. Gen. Franklin. On the 15th the following were receivthe cessation of the firing indicated, and Gen. Franklin was ordered to remain where he was, to wat[5 more...]
George Brinton McClellan (search for this): chapter 33
Chapter 33: Maryland invaded McClellan not to command in the field Halleck declines advice about Harper's Ferry the North in danger McClellan assumes command the halter around his neck McClellan unrestrained marching, and reorganiMcClellan unrestrained marching, and reorganizing the army on the march Harper's Ferry lost McClellan relieves it, but miles surrenders Franklin's victory at Crampton'McClellan relieves it, but miles surrenders Franklin's victory at Crampton's Gap. Next day I rode to the front of Alexandria, and was engaged in rectifying the positions of the troops and giving orand the utmost activity that a general can exercise. Geo. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. W. B. Franklin, Comd you must follow the enemy as rapidly as possible. George B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Franklin. Gen.. W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Commanding 6th. Corps. Gen. G. B. McClellan. Sept. 15, 11 A. M. general: I have received yorong. Respectfully, W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, Commanding. Col. Miles surrendered Harper's
John Newton (search for this): chapter 33
lin. Gen. Franklin pushed his corps rapidly forward towards Crampton's Pass, and at about twelve o'clock on the 14th arrived at Burkittsville, immediately in rear of which he found the enemy's infantry posted in force on both sides of the road, with artillery in strong positions to defend the approaches to the pass. Slocum's division was formed upon the right of the road leading through the gap, and Smith's upon the left. A line formed of Bartlett's and Torbert's brigades, supported by Newton, whose activity was conspicuous, advanced steadily upon the enemy at a charge on the right. The enemy were driven from their position at the base of the mountain, where they were protected by a stone wall, steadily forced back up the slope until they reached the position of their battery on the road, well up the mountain. There they made a stand. They were, however, driven back, retiring their artillery in echelon, until, after an action of three hours, the crest was gained, and the enemy
enemy is drawn up in line of battle about two miles to our front--one brigade in sight. As soon as I am sure that Rohrersville is occupied I shall move forward to attack the enemy. This may be two hours from now. If Harper's Ferry is fallen — and the cessation of firing makes me fear that it has — it is my opinion that I should be strongly reinforced. W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Commanding 6th. Corps. Gen. G. B. McClellan. Sept. 15, 11 A. M. general: I have received your despatch by Capt. O'Keefe. The enemy is in large force in my front, in two lines of battle stretching across the valley, and a large column of artillery and infantry on the right of the valley looking towards Harper's Ferry. They outnumber me two to one. It of course will not answer to pursue the enemy under these circumstances. I shall communicate with Burnside as soon as possible. In the meantime I shall wait here until I learn what is the prospect of reinforcement. I have not the force to justify an atta
D. S. Miles (search for this): chapter 33
from Gen. Halleck: There is no way for Col. Miles to join you at present; his only chance is ty to prevent the withdrawal of the forces of Col. Miles, I recommended to the proper authorities thar's Ferry. It was confidently expected that Col. Miles would hold out until we had carried the mounbandonment of the Maryland Heights, and that Col. Miles instructed him to say that he could hold outme afternoon I wrote the following letter to Col. Miles, and despatched three copies by three differorge B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Col. D. S. Miles. On the previous day I had sent Gen. apture the garrison at Martinsburg and cut off Miles's retreat towards the west. A division on theroy, or capture McLaws's command and relieve Col. Miles. If you effect this you will order him to jld you succeed in opening communication with Col. Miles, direct him to join you with his whole comma. Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, Commanding. Col. Miles surrendered Harper's Ferry at eight A. M. on[7 more...]
W. F. Bartlett (search for this): chapter 33
cClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Franklin. Gen. Franklin pushed his corps rapidly forward towards Crampton's Pass, and at about twelve o'clock on the 14th arrived at Burkittsville, immediately in rear of which he found the enemy's infantry posted in force on both sides of the road, with artillery in strong positions to defend the approaches to the pass. Slocum's division was formed upon the right of the road leading through the gap, and Smith's upon the left. A line formed of Bartlett's and Torbert's brigades, supported by Newton, whose activity was conspicuous, advanced steadily upon the enemy at a charge on the right. The enemy were driven from their position at the base of the mountain, where they were protected by a stone wall, steadily forced back up the slope until they reached the position of their battery on the road, well up the mountain. There they made a stand. They were, however, driven back, retiring their artillery in echelon, until, after an action of t
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 33
rbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal officers inform me that he is now in Pleasant Valley. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A diwill then return by Rohrersville on the direct road to Boonsborough, if the main column has not succeeded in its attack. If it has succeeded, take the road to Rohrersville, to Sharpsburg and Williamsport, in order either to cut off the retreat of Hill and Longstreet towards the Potomac, or prevent the repassage of Jackson. My general idea is to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. I believe I have sufficiently explained my intentions. I ask of you, at this important moment, all your
R. H. Anderson (search for this): chapter 33
the following instructions: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp near Frederick, Sept. 13, 1862, 6.20 P. M. general: I have now full information as to movements and intentions of the enemy. Jackson has crossed the upper Potomac to capture the garrison at Martinsburg and cut off Miles's retreat towards the west. A division on the south side of the Potomac was to carry Loudon Heights and cut off his retreat in that direction. McLaws, with his own command and the division of R. H. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal officers inform me that he is now in Pleasant Valley. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after
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