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, as I was more than once cautioned that I was moving too rashly and exposing the capital to an attack from the Virginia side. As is well known, the result of Gen. Pope's operations had not been favorable, and when I finally resumed command of the troops in and around Washington they were weary, disheartened, their organization essarily left at Fort Monroe and Yorktown for lack of vessels, as the important point was to move the infantry divisions as rapidly as possible to the support of Gen. Pope. The divisions of the Army of Virginia were also exhausted and weakened, and their trains and supplies disorganized and deficient by the movements in which they circumstances they gained those victories; for the work of supply and reorganization was continued The Army of Virginia, which had been under the command of Gen. Pope, ceased to exist on the 2d of Sept., 1862, by force of circumstances, and, so far as appears, without any order issued. The following correspondence is the only
the 2d and 12th corps were moved to Rockville, and Couch's division (the only one of the 4th corps that had been brought from the Peninsula) to Offutt's cross-roads. On the 6th the 1st and 9th corps were ordered to Leesburg; the 6th corps and Sykes's division of the 5th corps to Tennallytown. On the 7th the 6th corps was advanced to Rockville, to which place my headquarters were moved on the same day. All the necessary arrangements for the defence of the city under the new condition oharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possible. Without waiting for the whole of that division to join, you will move at daybreak in the morning by Je
George D. Ruggles (search for this): chapter 33
property he can carry with him. The remainder of the guns will be spiked or destroyed; the rest of the public property will also be destroyed. You will then proceed to Boonsborough — which place the commanding general intends to attack to-morrow — and join the main body of the army at that place. Should you find, however, that the enemy has retreated from Boonsborough towards Sharpsburg, you will endeavor to fall upon him and cut off his retreat. By command of Maj.-Gen. McClellan. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and A. B. C. Gen. Franklin. On the 15th the following were received from Gen. Franklin: At the foot of the mountain in Pleasant Valley, three miles from Rohrersville, Sept. 15, 8.50 A. M. general: My command started at daylight this morning, and I am waiting to have it closed up here. Gen. Couch arrived about ten o'clock last night. I have ordered one of his brigades and one battery to Rohrersville, or to the strongest point in its vicinity. The enemy is drawn up i
N. H. Davis (search for this): chapter 33
t understanding of this matter, to state that I was directed on the 12th to assume command of the garrison of Harper's Ferry as soon as I should open communications with that place, and that when I received this order all communication from the direction in which I was approaching was cut off. Up to that time, however, Col. Miles could, in my opinion, have marched his command into Pennsylvania by crossing the Potomac at Williamsport or above; and this opinion was confirmed by the fact that Col. Davis marched the cavalry part of Col. Miles's command from Harper's Ferry on the 14th, taking the main road to Hagerstown, and he encountered no enemy except a small picket near the mouth of the Antietam. Before I left Washington, and when there certainly could have been no enemy to prevent the withdrawal of the forces of Col. Miles, I recommended to the proper authorities that the garrison of Harper's Ferry should be withdrawn via Hagerstown, to aid in covering the Cumberland valley; or tha
an intelligent statement of the movements of that army. But another paragraph in the same report makes testimony from such sources quite superfluous. It is as follows: By a reference to the evidence it will be seen that at the very moment Col. Ford abandoned Maryland Heights his little army was in reality relieved by Gens. Franklin's and Sumner's corps at Crampton's Gap, within seven miles of his position. The corps of Gens. Franklin and Sumner were a part of the army which I at that time had the honor to command, and they were acting under my orders at Crampton's Gap and elsewhere; and if, as the commission states, Col. Ford's little army was in reality relieved by those officers, it was relieved by me. I had, on the morning of the 10th, sent the following despatch in relation to the command at Harper's Ferry to Gen. Halleck: Sept. 10, 9.45 A. M. Col. Miles is at or near Harper's Ferry, as I understand, with 9,000 troops. He can do nothing where he is, but co
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 33
ennallytown. On the 7th the 6th corps was advanced to Rockville, to which place my headquarters were moved on the same day. All the necessary arrangements for the defence of the city under the new condition of things had been made, and Gen. Banks was left in command, having received his instructions from me. As the time had now arrived for the army to advance, and I had received no orders to take command of it, but had been expressly told that the assignment of a commander had not beenr several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possible. Without waiting for the whole of that division to join, you will move at daybreak in the mo
Jonathan Pope (search for this): chapter 33
s, and further details of the march. What is my command, and where is it? McClellan has scattered it about in all directions, and has not informed me of the position of a single regiment. Am I to take the field, and under McClellan's orders? Jno. Pope, Maj.-Gen. Washington D. C., Sept. 5, 1862. Maj.-Gen. Pope, Arlington. The armies of the Potomac and Virginia being consolidated, you will report for orders to the Secretary of War. H. W. Halleck, Gen.-in-chief. as best we might whiMaj.-Gen. Pope, Arlington. The armies of the Potomac and Virginia being consolidated, you will report for orders to the Secretary of War. H. W. Halleck, Gen.-in-chief. as best we might while on the march, and after the close of the battles so much remained to be done to place the army in condition for a campaign that the delay which ensued was absolutely unavoidable, and the army could not have entered upon a new campaign one day earlier than it did. The purpose of advancing from Washington was simply to meet the necessities of the moment by frustrating Lee's invasion of the Northern States, and, when that was accomplished, to push with the utmost rapidity the work of reorgani
y. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possible. Without waiting for the whole of that division to join, you will move at daybreak in the morning by Jefferson and Burkittsville upon the road to Rohrersville. I have reliable information that the mountain-pass by this road is practicable for
, etc., and soon bowed us out, leaving matters at Harper's Ferry precisely as they were. On Sept. 5 the 2d and 12th corps were moved to Rockville, and Couch's division (the only one of the 4th corps that had been brought from the Peninsula) to Offutt's cross-roads. On the 6th the 1st and 9th corps were ordered to Leesburg; the 6th corps and Sykes's division of the 5th corps to Tennallytown. On the 7th the 6th corps was advanced to Rockville, to which place my headquarters were moved on affairs occurred. Partly in order to move men freely and rapidly, partly in consequence of the lack of accurate information as to the exact position and intention of Lee's army, the troops advanced by three main roads that near the Potomac by Offutt's cross-roads and the mouth of the Seneca, that by Rockville to Frederick, and that by Brookeville and Urbana to New Market. We were then in condition to act according to the development of the enemy's plans, and to concentrate rapidly in any po
Edwin V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 33
lle, and the 9th corps via Damascus and New Market. The 2d and 12th corps, forming the centre, under the command of Gen. Sumner, moved on Frederick; the former via Clarksburg and Urbana, the 12th corps on a lateral road between Urbana and New Mart at the very moment Col. Ford abandoned Maryland Heights his little army was in reality relieved by Gens. Franklin's and Sumner's corps at Crampton's Gap, within seven miles of his position. The corps of Gens. Franklin and Sumner were a part of Sumner were a part of the army which I at that time had the honor to command, and they were acting under my orders at Crampton's Gap and elsewhere; and if, as the commission states, Col. Ford's little army was in reality relieved by those officers, it was relieved by me. of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his div
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