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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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D. N. Couch (search for this): chapter 33
as they were. On Sept. 5 the 2d and 12th corps were moved to Rockville, and Couch's division (the only one of the 4th corps that had been brought from the Penins it have been necessary (as was supposed) to force the line of the Monocacy. Couch's division moved by the river road, covering that approach, watching the fords ner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to concentrate his division and join you as rapidly as possibl, 1862, 2 P. M. Your despatch of 12.30 just received. Send back to hurry up Couch. Mass your troops and carry Burkittsville at any cost. We shall have strong otarted at daylight this morning, and I am waiting to have it closed up here. Gen. Couch arrived about ten o'clock last night. I have ordered one of his brigades and he was ordered to join the main body of the army at Keedysville, after sending Couch's division to Maryland Heights. While the events which have just been descri
H. W. Slocum (search for this): chapter 33
ass, and at about twelve o'clock on the 14th arrived at Burkittsville, immediately in rear of which he found the enemy's infantry posted in force on both sides of the road, with artillery in strong positions to defend the approaches to the pass. Slocum's division was formed upon the right of the road leading through the gap, and Smith's upon the left. A line formed of Bartlett's and Torbert's brigades, supported by Newton, whose activity was conspicuous, advanced steadily upon the enemy at a cy in echelon, until, after an action of three hours, the crest was gained, and the enemy hastily fled down the mountain on the other side. On the left of the road Brooks's and Irvin's brigades, of Smith's division, formed for the protection of Slocum's flank, charged up the mountain in the same steady manner, driving the enemy before them until the crest was carried. 400 prisoners from seventeen different organizations, 700 stand of arms, 1 piece of artillery, and 3 colors were captured by o
A. T. Torbert (search for this): chapter 33
Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Franklin. Gen. Franklin pushed his corps rapidly forward towards Crampton's Pass, and at about twelve o'clock on the 14th arrived at Burkittsville, immediately in rear of which he found the enemy's infantry posted in force on both sides of the road, with artillery in strong positions to defend the approaches to the pass. Slocum's division was formed upon the right of the road leading through the gap, and Smith's upon the left. A line formed of Bartlett's and Torbert's brigades, supported by Newton, whose activity was conspicuous, advanced steadily upon the enemy at a charge on the right. The enemy were driven from their position at the base of the mountain, where they were protected by a stone wall, steadily forced back up the slope until they reached the position of their battery on the road, well up the mountain. There they made a stand. They were, however, driven back, retiring their artillery in echelon, until, after an action of three hours, th
than one occasion before the final advance to South Mountain and Antietam took place. Before I went to the front Secretary Seward came to my quarters one evening and asked my opinion of the condition of affairs at Harper's Ferry, remarking that he was not at ease on the subject. Harper's Ferry was not at that time in any sense under my control, but I told Mr. Seward that I regarded the arrangements there as exceedingly dangerous; that in my opinion the proper course was to abandon the positexplanation by the secretary as to the interview being at his request, I said to Halleck precisely what I had stated to Mr. Seward. Halleck received my statement with ill-concealed contempt; said that everything was all right as it was; that my viwith my staff and personal escort I left my card, with P. P. C. written upon it, at the White House, War Office, and Secretary Seward's house, and went on my way. I was afterwards accused of assuming command without authority, for nefarious purpos
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 33
inforce me ; but none came. On the 12th I received the following telegram from his Excellency the President: Governor Curtin telegraphs me: I have advices that Jackson is crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, and probably the whole rebel army will be drawn from Maryland. The President adds: Receiving nothing from Harper's Ferrarters, Army of the Potomac, Camp near Frederick, Sept. 13, 1862, 6.20 P. M. general: I have now full information as to movements and intentions of the enemy. Jackson has crossed the upper Potomac to capture the garrison at Martinsburg and cut off Miles's retreat towards the west. A division on the south side of the Potomac waad to Rohrersville, to Sharpsburg and Williamsport, in order either to cut off the retreat of Hill and Longstreet towards the Potomac, or prevent the repassage of Jackson. My general idea is to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. I believe I have sufficiently explained my intentions. I ask of you, at this important mome
F. J. Porter (search for this): chapter 33
y neck; for if the Army of the Potomac had been defeated and I had survived I would, no doubt, have been tried for assuming authority without orders, and, in the state of feeling which so unjustly condemned the innocent and most meritorious Gen. F. J. Porter, I would probably have been condemned to death. I was fully aware of the risk I ran, but the path of duty was clear and I tried to follow it. It was absolutely necessary that Lee's army should be met, and, in the state of affairs I haveink the main force of the enemy is in your front. More troops can be spared from here. This despatch, as published by the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and furnished by the general-in-chief, reads as follows: Why not order forward Porter's corps or Sigel's? If the main force of the enemy is in your front, more troops can be spared from here. I remark that the original despatch, as received by me from the telegraph operator, is in the words quoted above: I think the main force
Fitz-Hugh Lee (search for this): chapter 33
ements in which they had been engaged. Had Gen. Lee remained in front of Washington it would haveet the necessities of the moment by frustrating Lee's invasion of the Northern States, and, when thation as to the exact position and intention of Lee's army, the troops advanced by three main roadsand to concentrate rapidly in any position. If Lee threatened our left flank by moving down the riof the army could move over to support them; if Lee took up a position behind the Seneca near Fredeand reorganization as rapidly as possible. Gen. Lee and I knew each other well in the days beforeount of caution: I in my endeavors to ascertain Lee's strength, position, and intentions before I sh, after we had the most positive evidence that Lee's entire army was in front of us, I received throm Washington, but from the Potomac, leaving Gen. Lee the opportunity to come down the Potomac and rmation which rendered it quite probable that Gen. Lee's army was in the vicinity of Frederick, but [2 more...]
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 33
, Gen.-in-Chief: I have just received an order from Gen. McClellan to have my command in readiness to march with three daails of the march. What is my command, and where is it? McClellan has scattered it about in all directions, and has not inf of a single regiment. Am I to take the field, and under McClellan's orders? Jno. Pope, Maj.-Gen. Washington D. C., tee on the Conduct of the War, says: In respect to Gen. McClellan going too fast, or too far from Washington, there can Potomac and get between him and Washington. I thought Gen. McClellan should keep more on the Potomac, and press forward hise deserved. The general-in-chief has testified that Gen. McClellan, after having received orders to repel the enemy invade of the river is concerned. Hold out to the last. George B. Mcclellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Col. D. S. Miles. On thel upon him and cut off his retreat. By command of Maj.-Gen. McClellan. Geo. D. Ruggles, Col. and A. B. C. Gen. Franklin.
J. Longstreet (search for this): chapter 33
with his own command and the division of R. H. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal officers inform me that he is now in Pleasant Valley. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I hearturn by Rohrersville on the direct road to Boonsborough, if the main column has not succeeded in its attack. If it has succeeded, take the road to Rohrersville, to Sharpsburg and Williamsport, in order either to cut off the retreat of Hill and Longstreet towards the Potomac, or prevent the repassage of Jackson. My general idea is to cut the enemy in two and beat him in detail. I believe I have sufficiently explained my intentions. I ask of you, at this important moment, all your intellect an
G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 33
rear of which he found the enemy's infantry posted in force on both sides of the road, with artillery in strong positions to defend the approaches to the pass. Slocum's division was formed upon the right of the road leading through the gap, and Smith's upon the left. A line formed of Bartlett's and Torbert's brigades, supported by Newton, whose activity was conspicuous, advanced steadily upon the enemy at a charge on the right. The enemy were driven from their position at the base of the mo, however, driven back, retiring their artillery in echelon, until, after an action of three hours, the crest was gained, and the enemy hastily fled down the mountain on the other side. On the left of the road Brooks's and Irvin's brigades, of Smith's division, formed for the protection of Slocum's flank, charged up the mountain in the same steady manner, driving the enemy before them until the crest was carried. 400 prisoners from seventeen different organizations, 700 stand of arms, 1 pie
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