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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
g, and reorganizing the army on the march Harper's Ferry lost McClellan relieves it, but miles sur my opinion of the condition of affairs at Harper's Ferry, remarking that he was not at ease on the subject. Harper's Ferry was not at that time in any sense under my control, but I told Mr. Seward ttions, for the reason that its presence at Harper's Ferry would not hinder the enemy from crossing tThe President adds: Receiving nothing from Harper's Ferry or Martinsburg to-day, and positive informficers in connection with the surrender of Harper's Ferry, I find the following: The commission rts of the cannon were distinctly heard at Harper's Ferry. It was confidently expected that Col. Mipography of the country in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, why Franklin, instead of marching his colenemy. This may be two hours from now. If Harper's Ferry is fallen — and the cessation of firing maon the right of the valley looking towards Harper's Ferry. They outnumber me two to one. It of cou[20 more...]
Brownsville, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
il we had carried the mountain-passes and were in condition to send a detachment to his relief. The left was therefore ordered to move through Crampton's Pass in front of Burkittsville, while the centre and right marched upon Turner's Pass in front of Middletown. It may be asked, by those who are not acquainted with the topography of the country in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, why Franklin, instead of marching his column over the circuitous road from Jefferson via Burkittsville and Brownsville, was not ordered to move along the direct turnpike to Knoxville, and thence up the river to Harper's Ferry. It was for the reason that I had received information that the enemy were anticipating our approach in that direction, and had established batteries on the south side of the Potomac which commanded all the approaches to Knoxville. Moreover, the road from that point winds directly along the river-bank at the foot of a precipitous mountain, where there was no opportunity of formin
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
perations; for, in case of a crossing in force, an active campaign would be necessary to cover Baltimore, prevent the invasion of Pennsylvania, and clear Maryland. I therefore, on the 3d, ordered at any cost, notwithstanding the condition of the troops; to put a stop to the invasion, save Baltimore and Washington, and throw him back across the Potomac. Nothing but sheer necessity justifie army could be rapidly concentrated in that direction to attack him in force; if he moved upon Baltimore the entire army could rapidly be thrown in his rear and his retreat cut off; if he moved by Ged the scene of action. Moreover, such a movement would have uncovered the communications with Baltimore and Washington on our right, and exposed our left and rear. I presume it will be admitted ben. Lee's army was in the vicinity of Frederick, but whether his intention was to move towards Baltimore or Pennsylvania was not then known. On the 11th I ordered Gen. Burnside to push a strong re
New Market (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
Offutt's cross-roads and the mouth of the Seneca, that by Rockville to Frederick, and that by Brookeville and Urbana to New Market. We were then in condition to act according to the development of the enemy's plans, and to concentrate rapidly in anyside, moved on Frederick; the 1st corps via Brookeville, Cooksville, and Ridgeville, and the 9th corps via Damascus and New Market. The 2d and 12th corps, forming the centre, under the command of Gen. Sumner, moved on Frederick; the former via Clarksburg and Urbana, the 12th corps on a lateral road between Urbana and New Market, thus maintaining the communication with the right wing and covering the direct road from Frederick to Washington. The 6th corps, under the command of Gen. Franklin, ered Gen. Burnside to push a strong reconnoissance across the National Road and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad towards New Market, and, if he learned that the enemy had moved towards Hagerstown, to press on rapidly to Frederick, keeping his troops c
Keedysville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ces. I shall communicate with Burnside as soon as possible. In the meantime I shall wait here until I learn what is the prospect of reinforcement. I have not the force to justify an attack on the force I see in front. I have had a very close view of it, and its position is very strong. Respectfully, W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, Commanding. Col. Miles surrendered Harper's Ferry at eight A. M. on the 15th, as the cessation of the firing indicated, and Gen. Franklin was ordered to remain where he was, to watch the large force in front of him and protect our left and rear, until the night of the 16th, when he was ordered to join the main body of the army at Keedysville, after sending Couch's division to Maryland Heights. While the events which have just been described were taking place at Crampton's Gap, the troops of the centre and right wing, which had united at Frederick on the 13th, were engaged in the contest for the possession of Turner's Gap.
Barnesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
ksville, and Ridgeville, and the 9th corps via Damascus and New Market. The 2d and 12th corps, forming the centre, under the command of Gen. Sumner, moved on Frederick; the former via Clarksburg and Urbana, the 12th corps on a lateral road between Urbana and New Market, thus maintaining the communication with the right wing and covering the direct road from Frederick to Washington. The 6th corps, under the command of Gen. Franklin, moved to Buckeystown via Darnestown, Dawsonville, and Barnesville, covering the road from the mouth of the Monocacy to Rockville, and being in a position to connect with and support the centre, should it have been necessary (as was supposed) to force the line of the Monocacy. Couch's division moved by the river road, covering that approach, watching the fords of the Potomac, and ultimately following and supporting the 6th corps. The following extracts from telegrams received by me after my departure from Washington will show how little was known t
Urbana (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
shed as far to the front as possible, and soon in constant contact with the enemy's cavalry, with whom several well-conducted and successful affairs occurred. Partly in order to move men freely and rapidly, partly in consequence of the lack of accurate information as to the exact position and intention of Lee's army, the troops advanced by three main roads that near the Potomac by Offutt's cross-roads and the mouth of the Seneca, that by Rockville to Frederick, and that by Brookeville and Urbana to New Market. We were then in condition to act according to the development of the enemy's plans, and to concentrate rapidly in any position. If Lee threatened our left flank by moving down the river road or by crossing the Potomac at any of the forks from Coon's Ferry upward, there were enough troops on the river road to hold him in check until the rest of the army could move over to support them; if Lee took up a position behind the Seneca near Frederick, the whole army could be rapidly
Darnestown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
1st corps via Brookeville, Cooksville, and Ridgeville, and the 9th corps via Damascus and New Market. The 2d and 12th corps, forming the centre, under the command of Gen. Sumner, moved on Frederick; the former via Clarksburg and Urbana, the 12th corps on a lateral road between Urbana and New Market, thus maintaining the communication with the right wing and covering the direct road from Frederick to Washington. The 6th corps, under the command of Gen. Franklin, moved to Buckeystown via Darnestown, Dawsonville, and Barnesville, covering the road from the mouth of the Monocacy to Rockville, and being in a position to connect with and support the centre, should it have been necessary (as was supposed) to force the line of the Monocacy. Couch's division moved by the river road, covering that approach, watching the fords of the Potomac, and ultimately following and supporting the 6th corps. The following extracts from telegrams received by me after my departure from Washington wil
Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
nd until he could be satisfied as to the condition of the Army of the Potomac after its second Bull Run campaign, and as to the intentions of its commander. The right wing, consisting of the 1st and 9th corps, under the command of Maj.-Gen. Burnside, moved on Frederick; the 1st corps via Brookeville, Cooksville, and Ridgeville, and the 9th corps via Damascus and New Market. The 2d and 12th corps, forming the centre, under the command of Gen. Sumner, moved on Frederick; the former via Clarksburg and Urbana, the 12th corps on a lateral road between Urbana and New Market, thus maintaining the communication with the right wing and covering the direct road from Frederick to Washington. The 6th corps, under the command of Gen. Franklin, moved to Buckeystown via Darnestown, Dawsonville, and Barnesville, covering the road from the mouth of the Monocacy to Rockville, and being in a position to connect with and support the centre, should it have been necessary (as was supposed) to force t
Dranesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 33
oved by the river road, covering that approach, watching the fords of the Potomac, and ultimately following and supporting the 6th corps. The following extracts from telegrams received by me after my departure from Washington will show how little was known there about the enemy's movements, and the fears which were entertained for the safety of the capital. On the 9th of Sept. Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Until we can get better advices about the numbers of the enemy at Dranesville, I think we must be very cautious about stripping too much the forts on the Virginia side. It may be the enemy's object to draw off the mass of our forces and then attempt to attack from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Think of this. Again, on the 11th of Sept., Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Why not order forward Keyes or Sigel? I think the main force of the enemy is in your front. More troops can be spared from here. This despatch, as published by the Committe
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