hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 963 5 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 555 5 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 405 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 365 1 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 347 3 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 332 24 Browse Search
John Pope 308 2 Browse Search
Edwin V. Sumner 292 2 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 271 1 Browse Search
J. Hooker 241 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

Found 690 total hits in 109 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
A. Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 33
of reorganization and supply, so that a new campaign might be promptly inaugurated with the army in condition to prosecute it to a successful termination without intermission. The advance from Washington was covered by the cavalry, under Gen. Pleasonton, pushed as far to the front as possible, and soon in constant contact with the enemy's cavalry, with whom several well-conducted and successful affairs occurred. Partly in order to move men freely and rapidly, partly in consequence of the move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, follo
E. D. Keyes (search for this): chapter 33
of the capital. On the 9th of Sept. Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Until we can get better advices about the numbers of the enemy at Dranesville, I think we must be very cautious about stripping too much the forts on the Virginia side. It may be the enemy's object to draw off the mass of our forces and then attempt to attack from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Think of this. Again, on the 11th of Sept., Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Why not order forward Keyes or Sigel? I think the main force of the enemy is in your front. More troops can be spared from here. This despatch, as published by the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and furnished by the general-in-chief, reads as follows: Why not order forward Porter's corps or Sigel's? If the main force of the enemy is in your front, more troops can be spared from here. I remark that the original despatch, as received by me from the telegraph operator, is in the words quoted above: I t
. The enemy were driven from their position at the base of the mountain, where they were protected by a stone wall, steadily forced back up the slope until they reached the position of their battery on the road, well up the mountain. There they made a stand. They were, however, driven back, retiring their artillery in echelon, until, after an action of three hours, the crest was gained, and the enemy hastily fled down the mountain on the other side. On the left of the road Brooks's and Irvin's brigades, of Smith's division, formed for the protection of Slocum's flank, charged up the mountain in the same steady manner, driving the enemy before them until the crest was carried. 400 prisoners from seventeen different organizations, 700 stand of arms, 1 piece of artillery, and 3 colors were captured by our troops in this brilliant action. It was conducted by Gen. Franklin in all its details. These details are given in a report of Gen. Franklin, and due credit awarded to the galla
C. S. Stuart (search for this): chapter 33
ds the west. A division on the south side of the Potomac was to carry Loudon Heights and cut off his retreat in that direction. McLaws, with his own command and the division of R. H. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal officers inform me that he is now in Pleasant Valley. The firing shows that Miles still holds out. Longstreet was to move to Boonsborough, and there halt with the reserve corps; D. H. Hill to form the rear-guard; Stuart's cavalry to bring up stragglers, etc. We have cleared out all the cavalry this side of the mountains and north of us. The last I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 33
ned marching, and reorganizing the army on the march Harper's Ferry lost McClellan relieves it, but miles surrenders Franklin's victory at Crampton's Gap. Next day I rode to the front of Alexandria, and was engaged in rectifying the positions ll your intellect and the utmost activity that a general can exercise. Geo. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Maj.-Gen. W. B. Franklin, Commanding 6th Corps. Again, on the 14th, I sent him the following: headquarters, Army of the Potomaclen — and the cessation of firing makes me fear that it has — it is my opinion that I should be strongly reinforced. W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Commanding 6th. Corps. Gen. G. B. McClellan. Sept. 15, 11 A. M. general: I have received your despatc on the force I see in front. I have had a very close view of it, and its position is very strong. Respectfully, W. B. Franklin, Maj.-Gen. Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, Commanding. Col. Miles surrendered Harper's Ferry at eight A. M. on the 15
be the enemy's object to draw off the mass of our forces and then attempt to attack from the Virginia side of the Potomac. Think of this. Again, on the 11th of Sept., Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Why not order forward Keyes or Sigel? I think the main force of the enemy is in your front. More troops can be spared from here. This despatch, as published by the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and furnished by the general-in-chief, reads as follows: Why not order forward Porter's corps or Sigel's? If the main force of the enemy is in your front, more troops can be spared from here. I remark that the original despatch, as received by me from the telegraph operator, is in the words quoted above: I think the main force of the enemy, etc. In accordance with this suggestion I asked, on the same day, that all the troops that could be spared should at once be sent to reinforce me ; but none came. On the 12th I received the following telegram from his
A. E. Burnside (search for this): chapter 33
ts commander. The right wing, consisting of the 1st and 9th corps, under the command of Maj.-Gen. Burnside, moved on Frederick; the 1st corps via Brookeville, Cooksville, and Ridgeville, and the 9tn was to move towards Baltimore or Pennsylvania was not then known. On the 11th I ordered Gen. Burnside to push a strong reconnoissance across the National Road and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad I heard from Pleasonton he occupied Middletown, after several sharp skirmishes. A division of Burnside's command started several hours ago to support him. The whole of Burnside's command, including Burnside's command, including Hooker's corps, march this evening and early to-morrow morning, followed by the corps of Sumner and Banks, and Sykes's division, upon Boonsborough to carry that position. Couch has been ordered to cocourse will not answer to pursue the enemy under these circumstances. I shall communicate with Burnside as soon as possible. In the meantime I shall wait here until I learn what is the prospect of r
on rapidly to Frederick, keeping his troops constantly ready to meet the enemy in force. A corresponding movement of all the troops in the centre and on the left was ordered in the direction of Urbana and Poolesville. On the 12th a portion of the right wing entered Frederick, after a brisk skirmish at the outskirts of the city and in the streets. On the 13th the main bodies of the right wing and centre passed through Frederick. In the report of a military commission, of which Maj.-Gen. D. Hunter was president, which convened at Washington for the purpose of investigating the conduct of certain officers in connection with the surrender of Harper's Ferry, I find the following: The commission has remarked freely on Col. Miles, an old officer, who has been killed in the service of his country, and it cannot, from any motives of delicacy, refrain from censuring those in high command when it thinks such censure deserved. The general-in-chief has testified that Gen. McClellan
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 33
oon as this was done I reported the fact to Gen. Halleck, who asked what general I had placed in comat I said, and asked me to accompany him to Gen. Halleck and repeat my statement to him. I acquiesced, and we went together to Gen. Halleck's quarters, where we found that he had retired for the nightprecisely what I had stated to Mr. Seward. Halleck received my statement with ill-concealed contd: Arlington. Sept. 5, 12.05 P. M. Maj.-Gen. Halleck, Gen.-in-Chief: I have just received report for orders to the Secretary of War. H. W. Halleck, Gen.-in-chief. as best we might while onsafety of the capital. On the 9th of Sept. Gen. Halleck telegraphed me as follows: Until we can get off without being hurt. On the 13th Gen. Halleck telegraphed as follows: Until you know moreelation to the command at Harper's Ferry to Gen. Halleck: Sept. 10, 9.45 A. M. Col. Miles To this I received the following reply from Gen. Halleck: There is no way for Col. Miles to joi[4 more...]
and cut off Miles's retreat towards the west. A division on the south side of the Potomac was to carry Loudon Heights and cut off his retreat in that direction. McLaws, with his own command and the division of R. H. Anderson, was to move by Boonsborbugh and Rohrersville to carry the Maryland Heights. The signal officers inform If this pass is not occupied by the enemy in force, seize it as soon as practicable, and debouch upon Rohrersville in order to cut off the retreat of or destroy McLaws's command. If you find this pass held by the enemy in large force, make all your dispositions for the attack and commence it about half an hour after you hear severe firing at the pass on the Hagerstown pike, where the main body will attack. Having gained the pass, your duty will be first to cut off, destroy, or capture McLaws's command and relieve Col. Miles. If you effect this you will order him to join you at once with all his disposable troops, first destroying the bridges over the
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11