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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5: private letters. [July 27 to Sept. 30, 1861.] July 27, 1861, Washington, D. C. I have been assigned to the command of a division composed of the departments of northeastern Virginia (that under McDowell) and that of Washington (now under Mansfield). Neither of them like it much, especially Mansfield; but I think they must ere long become accustomed to it, as there is no help for it. . . . I find myself in a new and strange position here: President, cabinet, Gen. Scott, and all deferring to me. By some strange operation of magic I seem to have become the power of the land. I see already the main causes of our recent failure; I am sure that I can remedy these, and am confident that I can lead these armies of men to victory once more. I start to-morrow very early on a tour through the lines on the other side of the river. It will occupy me all day long, and a rather fatiguing ride it will be, but I will be able to make up my mind as to the state of things. Ref
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
he organization, and some little to our forces. I have now about 80 field-guns (there were but 49 at Bull Run), and by Saturday will have 112. There were only some 400 cavalry at Bull Run; I now have about 1,200, and by the close of the week will have some 3,000. I am gaining rapidly in every way. I can now defend Washington with almost perfect certainty. When I came here it could have been taken with the utmost ease. In a week I ought to be perfectly safe and be prepared to defend all Maryland; in another week to advance our position. . . . The men were very enthusiastic and looked well. My old State will come out handsomely. I have been much vexed to-night by sundry troublesome things; the only comfort has been your father's arrival, which is a great relief to me. I like to see that cool, steady head near me. Aug. 23. . . . Yesterday I rode to Alexandria and reviewed four brigades — that is, seventeen regiments. . . Beauregard has missed his chance, and I have gained
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ree to four times my force; the President, the old general, cannot or will not see the true state of affairs. Most of my troops are demoralized by the defeat at Bull Run; some regiments even mutinous. I have probably stopped that; but you see my position is not pleasant. . . . I have, I believe made the best possible disposition adds to the strength of my defences, to the perfection of the organization, and some little to our forces. I have now about 80 field-guns (there were but 49 at Bull Run), and by Saturday will have 112. There were only some 400 cavalry at Bull Run; I now have about 1,200, and by the close of the week will have some 3,000. I am Bull Run; I now have about 1,200, and by the close of the week will have some 3,000. I am gaining rapidly in every way. I can now defend Washington with almost perfect certainty. When I came here it could have been taken with the utmost ease. In a week I ought to be perfectly safe and be prepared to defend all Maryland; in another week to advance our position. . . . The men were very enthusiastic and looked well.
Little Falls, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
y quarter to-night is favorable. All goes well. Sept. 4, 1861. I took an early dinner, and then mounted the bay, Sturgis's horse, and rode to McCall's camp at Tennallytown. Sweitzer and Colburn went with me, as usual when hard riding is expected; also the ordinary escort of a sergeant and ten dragoons . . . . Learned that the firing at Great Falls amounted to little, and that the orders I had before given to send another regiment and another battery were sufficient. Then rode to Little Falls (Chain Bridge) and went along the whole picket-line. Sept. .--. . . Had my dinner just after writing the above, and then rode to review a brigade and 32 guns away over beyond the Capitol. Just as I got through Seth rode up with a message to the effect that the enemy were in force near Smith (W. F.) I rode rapidly home, changed my horse, and rode out to Smith's camp. I determined at once to throw Smith across the river, and went over with his brigade myself till I saw him in posit
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ters. [July 27 to Sept. 30, 1861.] July 27, 1861, Washington, D. C. I have been assigned to the command of a division, and the sword by some other fait d‘éclat. July 30, Washington . . Had to work until nearly three this morning. . . I could see that many marked the contrast. . . . I have Washington perfectly quiet now. You would not know that there was ahen I get out for a ride, no relief for mind or body. Washington, 16th. . . . I am here in a terrible place: the enemfe. We may have to fight a battle under the defences of Washington within a week, and I did not care to have you exposed to00. I am gaining rapidly in every way. I can now defend Washington with almost perfect certainty. When I came here it coulhat I have not been killed a single time since I reached Washington. So don't believe any such absurd rumors. How lucky ththat they are flaunting their dirty little flag in my face, and I hope they have taken their last look at Washington. . .
Tennallytown (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
had entirely disconcerted their plans and that they did not know what to do. They are suffering much from sickness, and I fancy are not in the best possible condition. If they venture to attack us here they will have an awful time of it. I do not think they will dare to attack. We are now ready for them. The news from every quarter to-night is favorable. All goes well. Sept. 4, 1861. I took an early dinner, and then mounted the bay, Sturgis's horse, and rode to McCall's camp at Tennallytown. Sweitzer and Colburn went with me, as usual when hard riding is expected; also the ordinary escort of a sergeant and ten dragoons . . . . Learned that the firing at Great Falls amounted to little, and that the orders I had before given to send another regiment and another battery were sufficient. Then rode to Little Falls (Chain Bridge) and went along the whole picket-line. Sept. .--. . . Had my dinner just after writing the above, and then rode to review a brigade and 32 guns a
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e want of officers of regiments. We have good material, but no officers. Aug. 14, 1861. I was so occupied yesterday that I could not write. Profs. Mahan and Bache at breakfast. Then came the usual levee. Then Burnside turned up, and I had to listen to his explanation of some slanders against him; then some naval officers; then I don't know how many others before dinner. After dinner I rode out until about nine, when I found the President had been to see me and wanted me at the White House. After I got through there I went to see Montgomery Blair on business. Then, on my return, found some more of the cabinet, McDowell, etc., so that it was after midnight when I got to my room, completely fatigued. So my days and nights pass, a steady course of conversations and orders all day. Except when I get out for a ride, no relief for mind or body. Washington, 16th. . . . I am here in a terrible place: the enemy have from three to four times my force; the President, the old
Somersworth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ture to attack us here they will have an awful time of it. I do not think they will dare to attack. We are now ready for them. The news from every quarter to-night is favorable. All goes well. Sept. 4, 1861. I took an early dinner, and then mounted the bay, Sturgis's horse, and rode to McCall's camp at Tennallytown. Sweitzer and Colburn went with me, as usual when hard riding is expected; also the ordinary escort of a sergeant and ten dragoons . . . . Learned that the firing at Great Falls amounted to little, and that the orders I had before given to send another regiment and another battery were sufficient. Then rode to Little Falls (Chain Bridge) and went along the whole picket-line. Sept. .--. . . Had my dinner just after writing the above, and then rode to review a brigade and 32 guns away over beyond the Capitol. Just as I got through Seth rode up with a message to the effect that the enemy were in force near Smith (W. F.) I rode rapidly home, changed my horse
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s to the fact that I am right and that we are in imminent danger. Providence is aiding me by heavy rains, which are swelling the Potomac, which may be impassable for a week; if so we are saved. If Beauregard comes down upon us soon I have everything ready to make a manoeuvre which will be decisive. Give me two weeks and I will defy Beauregard; in a week the chances will be at least even. Aug. 18. My command is at last extended, so that I take in Banks in the Shenandoah and Dix at Baltimore. . . . The true reason why I did not bring you here was that I did not deem it safe. We may have to fight a battle under the defences of Washington within a week, and I did not care to have you exposed to the chances. If Beauregard does not attack within two days he has lost every chance of success. If by the time you receive this letter you have not heard of a battle through the telegraph you may be easy and contented. Aug. 19. . . If this week passes without a battle, and reinf
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
policy. . . . I have scarcely slept one moment for the last three nights, knowing well that the enemy intend some movement and fully recognizing our own weakness. If Beauregard does not attack to-night I shall look upon it as a dispensation of Providence. He ought to do it. Every day strengthens me. I am leaving nothing undone to increase our force; but the old general always comes in the way. He understands nothing, appreciates nothing. Aug.--.--On Sunday, instead of going to church, was seir reply to everything is, Impossible! Impossible! They think nothing possible which is against their wishes. Aug. 16, 6 P. M. . . Gen. Scott is at last opening his eyes to the fact that I am right and that we are in imminent danger. Providence is aiding me by heavy rains, which are swelling the Potomac, which may be impassable for a week; if so we are saved. If Beauregard comes down upon us soon I have everything ready to make a manoeuvre which will be decisive. Give me two weeks a
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