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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

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Duc Chartres (search for this): chapter 8
, though they had fully earned promotion before the close of their connection with the army. They served precisely as the other aides, taking their full share of all duty, whether agreeable or disagreeable, dangerous or the reverse. They were fine young fellows and good soldiers, and deserved high credit in every way. Their uncle, the Prince de Joinville, who accompanied them as a Mentor, held no official position, but our relations were always confidential and most agreeable. The Duc de Chartres had received a military education at the military school at Turin; the Comte de Paris had only received instruction in military matters from his tutors. They had their separate establishment, being accompanied by a physician and a captain of chasseurs-à--pied. The latter was an immense man, who could never, under any circumstances, be persuaded to mount a horse: he always made the march on foot. Their little establishment was usually the jolliest in camp, and it was often a great r
Rufus Ingalls (search for this): chapter 8
every duty assigned to him. Constantly improving, he was, when killed at Gettysburg, with Meade and Sedgwick, the best officer then with the Army of the Potomac. He was remarkably brave and intelligent, an honest, true gentleman. Meade was also one of my early appointments as brigadier-general. He was an excellent officer; cool, brave, and intelligent; he always did his duty admirably, and was an honest man. As commander of an army he was far superior to either Hooker or Burnside. Col. Ingalls was, in my experience, unequalled as a chief-quartermaster in the field. When first assigned to the command in the Department of the Ohio, I applied for Fitz-John Porter as my adjutant-general, but he was already on duty with Gen. Patterson in the same capacity, and could not be spared. Soon afterwards I obtained Maj. Seth Williams, who had been on duty with Gen. Harney at St. Louis, and he remained with me as my adjutant-general until I was finally relieved from the command of the Ar
Seth Williams (search for this): chapter 8
brave, and intelligent; he always did his duty admirably, and was an honest man. As commander of an army he was far superior to either Hooker or Burnside. Col. Ingalls was, in my experience, unequalled as a chief-quartermaster in the field. When first assigned to the command in the Department of the Ohio, I applied for Fitz-John Porter as my adjutant-general, but he was already on duty with Gen. Patterson in the same capacity, and could not be spared. Soon afterwards I obtained Maj. Seth Williams, who had been on duty with Gen. Harney at St. Louis, and he remained with me as my adjutant-general until I was finally relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac. I never met with a better bureau officer, perhaps never with so good a one. He thoroughly understood the working of the adjutant-general's department, was indefatigable in the performance of his duty, made many and valuable suggestions as to the system of returns, reports, etc., and thus exerted a great influence
Edwin V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Various generals Scott, Halleck, Hunter, Sumner, Franklin, Porter, Sedgwick, and others Blenker's brigade scenes in his command the Hungarian Klapka the French prisoners events in Maryland. It is a great mistake to sue first divisions. I have since sometimes thought that I would have done well had I given him command of the cavalry. Sumner was in California when I assumed command; he returned not long before we took the field, and at once received a division.erly example was of the highest value in a new army. A nation is fortunate that possesses many such soldiers as was Edwin V. Sumner. Franklin was one of the best officers I had; very powerful. He was a man not only of excellent judgment, but ofgly attached to me; I could control them as no one else could, and they would have done good service had they remained in Sumner's corps. The regiments were all foreign and mostly of Germans; but the most remarkable of all was the Garibaldi regiment
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Various generals Scott, Halleck, Hunter, Sumner, Franklin, Porter, Sedgwick, and others Blenker's brigade scenes in his command the Hungarian Klapka the French prisoners events in Maryland. It is a great mistake to suppose that I had the cordial support of Gen. Scott; the contrary was too much the luable man, and his soldierly example was of the highest value in a new army. A nation is fortunate that possesses many such soldiers as was Edwin V. Sumner. Franklin was one of the best officers I had; very powerful. He was a man not only of excellent judgment, but of a remarkably high order of intellectual ability. He was of the ground near Washington that I did not know thoroughly. The most entertaining of my duties were those which sometimes led me to Blenker's camp, whither Franklin was always glad to accompany me to see the circus, or opera, as he usually called the performance. As soon as we were sighted Blenker would have the officer's c
Louis Philippe (search for this): chapter 8
k was an inexhaustible source of amusement, because everything ludicrous that struck his fancy on the march was sure to find a place there. He was a man of far more than ordinary ability and of excellent judgment. His deafness was, of course, a disadvantage to him, but his admirable qualities were so marked that I became warmly attached to him, as, in fact, I did to all the three, and I have good reason to know that the feeling was mutual. Whatever may have been the peculiarities of Louis Philippe during his later life, it is very certain that in his youth, as the Duc de Chartres, he was a brave, dashing, and excellent soldier. His sons, especially the Ducs d'orleans, d'aumale, Montpensier, and the Prince de Joinville, showed the same characteristics in Algiers and elsewhere; and I may be permitted to say that my personal experience with the three members of the family who served with me was such that there could be no doubt as to their courage, energy, and military spirit. The
John Reynolds (search for this): chapter 8
ille in storming the works on Marie's Heights, and afterwards holding his own against tremendous odds, was a remarkable and most brilliant feat of arms. Hancock received a brigade early in the formation of the Army of the Potomac. He was a man of the most chivalrous courage, and of a superb presence, especially in action; he had a wonderfully quick and correct eye for ground and for handling troops; his judgment was good, and it would be difficult to find a better corps commander. John Reynolds was commandant of the corps of cadets when the war broke out. He gained a high reputation in the Mexican war as an officer of light artillery, and was among the first whom I caused to be appointed brigadier-general. He was a splendid soldier and performed admirably every duty assigned to him. Constantly improving, he was, when killed at Gettysburg, with Meade and Sedgwick, the best officer then with the Army of the Potomac. He was remarkably brave and intelligent, an honest, true gentl
E. A. Hitchcock (search for this): chapter 8
aced villain in America; he said that he was totally destitute of principle, and that in the Almaden Quicksilver case he had convicted Halleck of perjury in open court. When Halleck arrived he came to caution me against Stanton, repeating almost precisely the same words that Stanton had employed. I made a note of this fact soon after its occurrence, and lately, Dec. 4, 1883, I saw for the first time, on page 833, vol. VIII., series 1, Official records of the War of the rebellion, Gen. E. A. Hitchcock's letter to Halleck, in which the former transmits a message from Stanton on the very same subject. This is eminently characteristic of Stanton, who would say one thing to a man's face and just the reverse behind his back. Of all men whom I have encountered in high position Halleck was the most hopelessly stupid. It was more difficult to get an idea through his head than can be conceived by any one who never made the attempt. I do not think he ever had a correct military idea fr
Washington Stanton (search for this): chapter 8
ce. Speaking of Halleck, a day or two before he arrived in Washington Stanton came to caution me against trusting Halleck, who was, he saidin open court. When Halleck arrived he came to caution me against Stanton, repeating almost precisely the same words that Stanton had employStanton had employed. I made a note of this fact soon after its occurrence, and lately, Dec. 4, 1883, I saw for the first time, on page 833, vol. VIII., se's letter to Halleck, in which the former transmits a message from Stanton on the very same subject. This is eminently characteristic of StaStanton, who would say one thing to a man's face and just the reverse behind his back. Of all men whom I have encountered in high position Hak, dated Washington, March 22, 1862: I then bid the secretary (Stanton) good-evening and left him, but he called me back, and added that nce and declined his services; but without my knowledge or consent Stanton appointed him a colonel on my staff. I still declined to have any
be permitted to say that my personal experience with the three members of the family who served with me was such that there could be no doubt as to their courage, energy, and military spirit. The course pursued by the Prince de Joinville and the Duc de Chartres during the fatal invasion of France by the Germans was in perfect harmony with this. Both sought service, under assumed names, in the darkest and most dangerous hours of their country's trial. The duke served for some months as Capt. Robert le Fort, and under that name, his identity being known to few if any beyond his closest personal friends, gained promotion and distinction by his gallantry and intelligence. Should the Comte de Paris ever reach the throne of Franceas is more than probable — I am sure that he will prove to be a wise, honest, and firm constitutional king, and that the honor and prosperity of France will be safer in his hands and those of his soldierly family than for many years past. Information from
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