hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Washington (United States) 963 5 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 555 5 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 405 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 365 1 Browse Search
A. E. Burnside 347 3 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 332 24 Browse Search
John Pope 308 2 Browse Search
Edwin V. Sumner 292 2 Browse Search
Irwin McDowell 271 1 Browse Search
J. Hooker 241 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. Search the whole document.

Found 231 total hits in 85 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
C. P. Stone (search for this): chapter 8
s an officer of the old army, bull-headed, brave, a good disciplinarian. He received his mortal wound at Antietam. To Stone I gave a detached brigade on the upper Potomac-ground with which he was familiar. He was a most charming and amiable geneciate his high qualities, but soon discovered them and gave him the first vacant division — that originally commanded by Stone. He was one of the best and most modest soldiers we had. Possessing excellent ability and judgment, the highest bravery,ion. (Signed) William H. Seward. To carry out these instructions the necessary orders were issued to Gens. Banks, Stone, and Hooker. I give a copy of the order issued to Gen. Banks; the others were the same, mutatis mutandis: headquarof the election. For the purpose of carrying out these instructions you are authorized to suspend the habeas corpus. Gen. Stone has received similar instructions to these. You will please confer with him as to the particular points that each shal
W. S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 8
s, wonderful powers in instructing and disciplining men, as well as in gaining their love, respect, and confidence, he was withal so modest and unobtrusive that it was necessary to be thrown closely in contact with him to appreciate him. He was thoroughly unselfish, honest, and true as steel. His conduct during the battle of Chancellorsville in storming the works on Marie's Heights, and afterwards holding his own against tremendous odds, was a remarkable and most brilliant feat of arms. Hancock received a brigade early in the formation of the Army of the Potomac. He was a man of the most chivalrous courage, and of a superb presence, especially in action; he had a wonderfully quick and correct eye for ground and for handling troops; his judgment was good, and it would be difficult to find a better corps commander. John Reynolds was commandant of the corps of cadets when the war broke out. He gained a high reputation in the Mexican war as an officer of light artillery, and was a
September 10th (search for this): chapter 8
f the most active members of the legislature, for the purpose of preventing the intended meeting and the passage of the act of secession, I gave that order a most full and hearty support as a measure of undoubted military necessity. On the 10th of Sept. Hon. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, instructed Gen. Banks to prevent the passage of any act of secession by the Maryland legislature, directing him to arrest all or any number of the members, if necessary, but in any event to do the work efpicuous and active secessionists of Baltimore, three of whom were members of the legislature. They were to be sent to Fort Monroe, their papers seized and examined. A special agent was sent to take immediate charge of the arrests. On the 10th of Sept. Gen. Dix sent to Secretary Seward and myself marked lists of the legislature. In his letters he strongly approved of the intended arrests, and advised that those arrested should be sent to New York harbor by a special steamer. The total n
September 20th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 8
a regiment, and did good service. At the close of the war, failing to be retained, he enlisted in a regular cavalry regiment, hoping to be examined and promoted to a commission; but his habits were against him. At last, in carrying the mail during the winter between the posts on the plains, his feet were frozen and, I think, amputated. Finally his family sent for him, and he returned home to die. Of a different order were the French princes who formed part of my military family from Sept. 20, 1861, to the close of the Seven Days. They served as captains, declining any higher rank, though they had fully earned promotion before the close of their connection with the army. They served precisely as the other aides, taking their full share of all duty, whether agreeable or disagreeable, dangerous or the reverse. They were fine young fellows and good soldiers, and deserved high credit in every way. Their uncle, the Prince de Joinville, who accompanied them as a Mentor, held no offi
December 4th, 1883 AD (search for this): chapter 8
shington Stanton came to caution me against trusting Halleck, who was, he said, probably the greatest scoundrel and most barefaced villain in America; he said that he was totally destitute of principle, and that in the Almaden Quicksilver case he had convicted Halleck of perjury in open court. When Halleck arrived he came to caution me against Stanton, repeating almost precisely the same words that Stanton had employed. I made a note of this fact soon after its occurrence, and lately, Dec. 4, 1883, I saw for the first time, on page 833, vol. VIII., series 1, Official records of the War of the rebellion, Gen. E. A. Hitchcock's letter to Halleck, in which the former transmits a message from Stanton on the very same subject. This is eminently characteristic of Stanton, who would say one thing to a man's face and just the reverse behind his back. Of all men whom I have encountered in high position Halleck was the most hopelessly stupid. It was more difficult to get an idea throug
ighest, and he was in all respects an admirable corps commander; more than that, he would have commanded an army well. The only reason why I did not send him to relieve Sherman, instead of Buell, was that I could not spare such a man from the Army of the Potomac. Blenker I found, and retained, in command of the Germans. Born in Bavaria, it was said he had served in Greece as a non-commissioned officer, and subsequently as a colonel or general officer in the revolutionary army of Baden in 1848. He was in many respects an excellent soldier; had his command in excellent drill, was very fond of display, but did not, or could not, always restrain his men from plundering. Had he remained with me I think that he and his division would have done good service, and that they would have been kept under good discipline. It would be difficult to find a more soldierly-looking set of men than he had under his command. Of his subordinate officers the best was Gen. Stahl, a Hungarian, who had
November 6th (search for this): chapter 8
f complaint. In fact, they might with justice have received much more severe treatment than they did. On the 28th of Oct. I received from the chief of the Secret Service a report in reference to the elections to be held in Maryland, on the 6th of Nov., for governor, members of the State legislature, etc. In this report he states that he had information of a general apprehension among the Union citizens of the southern part of the State of a serious interference with their rights of suffrageision at Muddy Branch, Md.: general: There is an apprehension among Union citizens in many parts of Maryland of an attempt at interference with the rights of suffrage by disunion citizens on the occasion of the election to take place on the 6th of Nov. next. In order to prevent this the major-general commanding directs that you send detachments of a sufficient number of men to the different points in your vicinity where the elections are to be held, to protect the Union voters and see that
August, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 8
name, his identity being known to few if any beyond his closest personal friends, gained promotion and distinction by his gallantry and intelligence. Should the Comte de Paris ever reach the throne of Franceas is more than probable — I am sure that he will prove to be a wise, honest, and firm constitutional king, and that the honor and prosperity of France will be safer in his hands and those of his soldierly family than for many years past. Information from various sources received in Aug. and Sept., 1861, convinced the government that there was serious danger of the secession of Maryland. The secessionists possessed about two-thirds of each branch of the State legislature, and the general government had what it regarded as good reasons for believing that a secret, extra, and illegal session of the legislature was about to be convened at Frederick on the 17th of Sept. in order to pass an ordinance of secession. It was understood that this action was to be supported by an ad
September, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 8
entity being known to few if any beyond his closest personal friends, gained promotion and distinction by his gallantry and intelligence. Should the Comte de Paris ever reach the throne of Franceas is more than probable — I am sure that he will prove to be a wise, honest, and firm constitutional king, and that the honor and prosperity of France will be safer in his hands and those of his soldierly family than for many years past. Information from various sources received in Aug. and Sept., 1861, convinced the government that there was serious danger of the secession of Maryland. The secessionists possessed about two-thirds of each branch of the State legislature, and the general government had what it regarded as good reasons for believing that a secret, extra, and illegal session of the legislature was about to be convened at Frederick on the 17th of Sept. in order to pass an ordinance of secession. It was understood that this action was to be supported by an advance of the
September 17th (search for this): chapter 8
ands and those of his soldierly family than for many years past. Information from various sources received in Aug. and Sept., 1861, convinced the government that there was serious danger of the secession of Maryland. The secessionists possessed about two-thirds of each branch of the State legislature, and the general government had what it regarded as good reasons for believing that a secret, extra, and illegal session of the legislature was about to be convened at Frederick on the 17th of Sept. in order to pass an ordinance of secession. It was understood that this action was to be supported by an advance of the Southern army across the Potomac — an advance which the Army of the Potomac was not yet in a condition to desire. Even an abortive attempt to carry out this design would have involved great civil confusion and military inconvenience. It was impossible to permit the secession of Maryland, intervening, as it did, between the capital and the loyal States, and commanding
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9