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Brighton (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.18
class, of clan and coterie; and when an outsider steps on the stage, there is solemn wrinkling of official foreheads, and lifting of distinguished eyebrows. So from the Royal Geographical some chill whiffs blew towards this American, who brought strange tidings from Africa. To Stanley, sensitive, high-strung, conscious of hard work, loyally done and faithfully reported, not hungry for fame, but solicitous of trust and confidence, all this was intensely bitter. There was a field-day at Brighton at the meeting of the Geographical Section of the British Association, under the presidency of Mr. (now, Sir) Francis Galton. Stanley was the central figure of the occasion. He spoke to an audience of three thousand, with a group of great geographers, and Eminences of high degree, including the ex-Emperor and Empress of the French. The Telegraph's report describes him as speaking with entire self-possession, with composure, with a natural and effective oratory, and with the evident purpo
Southampton (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.18
he may not be offended if I add him amongst my best friends also. It was on his way home from the Ashantee War that the tidings met Stanley, which he accepted and acted upon as a summons to his real life's work. 25th February, 1874. Arrived at the Island of St. Vincent, per Dromedary, I was shocked to hear, on getting ashore, of the death of Livingstone at Ilala, near Lake Bangweolo, on May 4th, 1873. His body is on its way to England, on board the Malwa, The Malwa arrived at Southampton on April 16, 1874. from Aden. Dear Livingstone! another sacrifice to Africa! His mission, however, must not be allowed to cease; others must go forward and fill the gap. Close up, boys! close up! Death must find us everywhere. May I be selected to succeed him in opening up Africa to the shining light of Christianity! My methods, however, will not be Livingstone's. Each man has his own way. His, I think, had its defects, though the old man, personally, has been almost Christ-like
America (Netherlands) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.18
man and a hero. But Stanley suffered so keenly and so long, not only at the time, but afterwards, from the misrepresentation and calumny he encountered, that a word more should be given to the subject. The hostility had various sources. In America, the New York Herald, always an aggressive, self-assertive, and successful newspaper, had plenty of journalistic foes. A former employee of Stanley's, whose behaviour had caused serious trouble, and brought proper punishment on him, gained thried something away to muse over at leisure. I am richer in the understanding of power and dominion, sitting enthroned on human features. He began in England his career as a public lecturer, and in pursuance of it went, in November, 1872, to America. He was received with high honours by the public, and with great cordiality by his old friends; was given a warm welcome by the boys, the sub-editors of the Herald, and was banqueted by the Union League Club, and the St. Andrew's Society, etc.,
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.18
Chapter XIV England and Coomassie it is not unadvisedly that the last chapter has been devoted almost as much to Livingstone as to Staa way, he had been more at home in Africa than he found himself in England. There his companionship had been with Nature, with Livingstone, ance, and a high resolve. In the months following his return to England, alternating with indignant protests against misrepresentation, hi and dominion, sitting enthroned on human features. He began in England his career as a public lecturer, and in pursuance of it went, in N spent several months in travelling and lecturing. Returning to England, before the clear summons came to his next great exploration, he ote, as occupying the hinterland of Elmina on the Gold Coast, which England had taken over from the Dutch. At intervals for half a century near Lake Bangweolo, on May 4th, 1873. His body is on its way to England, on board the Malwa, The Malwa arrived at Southampton on April
ch the Ashantee warriors creep on all fours, and lie in wait in the gloomy recesses for the enemy. It was in such localities Sir Garnet found the Ashantees, and where he suffered such loss in his Staff and officers. Until the sonorous sounds of Danish musketry The natives used old Danish muskets. suddenly awoke the echoes, few of us suspected the foe so near; until they betrayed their presence, the English might have searched in vain for the hidden enemy. Secure as they were in their unappDanish muskets. suddenly awoke the echoes, few of us suspected the foe so near; until they betrayed their presence, the English might have searched in vain for the hidden enemy. Secure as they were in their unapproachable coverts, our volleys, which their loud-mouthed challenge evoked, searched many a sinister-looking bush, and in a couple of hours effectually silenced their fire. The fighting, when it came, was stubborn. King Theodore's warriors had shewn no such mettle as did the Ashantees, who, for five continuous days, waged fierce fight. On the first day, with the 42nd Highlanders, the Black Watch, bearing the brunt, and the whole force engaged, the battle of Amoaful was won; then three days o
him amongst my best friends also. It was on his way home from the Ashantee War that the tidings met Stanley, which he accepted and acted upon as a summons to his real life's work. 25th February, 1874. Arrived at the Island of St. Vincent, per Dromedary, I was shocked to hear, on getting ashore, of the death of Livingstone at Ilala, near Lake Bangweolo, on May 4th, 1873. His body is on its way to England, on board the Malwa, The Malwa arrived at Southampton on April 16, 1874. from Aden. Dear Livingstone! another sacrifice to Africa! His mission, however, must not be allowed to cease; others must go forward and fill the gap. Close up, boys! close up! Death must find us everywhere. May I be selected to succeed him in opening up Africa to the shining light of Christianity! My methods, however, will not be Livingstone's. Each man has his own way. His, I think, had its defects, though the old man, personally, has been almost Christ-like for goodness, patience, and self-
uld, at least, give some little play to his own imagination. The few lines given to the contest with Mirambo represent months of struggle with a bandit-chief, and with slippery allies. The three-line mention of the joint exploration of Lake Tanganyika stands for four weeks of adventurous voyaging, geographical discovery, and encounters with hostile or thievish natives. Through the whole period Stanley carried an immense and varied responsibility. He was not only commander, and chief of . But, in his Journal, he records that his stage-fright was so extreme he could only begin after three trials. At the request of the Royal Geographical, he had prepared a brief paper, dealing only with the exploration of the north end of Lake Tanganyika. But, unexpectedly, he was called on to give some account of his whole expedition. He told his story, and read his paper. A general discussion followed, turning mainly on certain geographical questions; and, at the end, Stanley was call
hole situation, and Sir Garnet Wolseley, for a somewhat hasty settlement of the business, after the fighting was over. Stanley's political foresight and desire for the promotion of civilisation and commerce, even in such a benighted part of West Africa, is well exemplified by the following passage:-- If we are wise, we will deprive our present enemy of their king, attach to ourselves these brave and formidable warriors, and through them open the whole of Central Africa to trade and commeCentral Africa to trade and commerce and the beneficent influences of civilisation. The Romans would have been delighted at such an opportunity of extending their power, for the benefit of themselves and the world at large. Nothing in Stanley's book indicates that he took any personal share in the fighting. But in Lord Wolseley's Story of a soldier's life, volume II, p. 342, occurs this passage: Not twenty yards off were several newspaper correspondents. One was Mr. Winwood Reid, a very cool and daring man, who had gone f
l care, of a force often numbering two hundred and more, all fell on him. For his followers he had to take the part of doctor, and occasionally of nurse, sometimes including the most menial offices. Often he was prostrated by fever, and once, before finding Livingstone, he lay unconscious for a week. Problems of war and diplomacy confronted him. Shall he pay tribute, or resist? Shall he join forces with the friendly tribes, and fight the fierce and powerful Mirambo who blocks the way to Ujiji? He fights, and his allies fail him at the pinch; so then he resorts to a long flanking march through unknown country, and literally circumvents his foes. So, for over a year, every faculty is kept at the highest tension. Along with the developing effect of the experience, comes the solitary communing with Nature, which brings a spiritual exaltation. Then follows the companionship with Livingstone, a man of heroic and ideal traits, uniquely educated by the African wilds; these two lear
Chapter XIV England and Coomassie it is not unadvisedly that the last chapter has been devoted almost as much to Livingold-rimmed and highly venerated, was said still to be at Coomassie, used as a drinking-cup by King Coffee. In 1863-64, trmanent form to his record in the first half of his book, Coomassie and Magdala (1874). This campaign on the West Coast, undeays in front, the decisive battle of Ordahsu was won, and Coomassie was taken. In the Capital were found ghastly relics of wore the advent of Explorers and Expeditions. The Fall of Coomassie, though attended with great loss of life, put an end to i army, the body was evenly laid out with the feet towards Coomassie. This meant, no doubt, Regard this face, white man, ye wng on to our capital, and learn the fate awaiting you. Coomassie is a town insulated by a deadly swamp. A thick jungly fois one hundred thousand warriors. Stanley, speaking of Coomassie, writes:-- The grove, which was but a continuation of
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