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pt, and clean away from the Suez Canal. Well, and then? But what is the use? A cold water speech from Lord Brassey quenches, or appears to, any little patriotic ardour that our Society Englishmen confess to having felt. If these people were to be consulted, they would vote for making England as small as she was in the pre-Alfred days, on condition they were not to be agitated. November 1st, 1898. Am gradually gaining strength after the illness which began in the South of France, August 15th. The long weeks in bed have given me abundant time for thought, and I have decided that the time has come for me to seek my long-desired rest. It has become clearer to me, each day, that I am too old to change my open-air habits for the asphyxiating atmosphere of the House of Commons. Consequent upon this Parliamentary life are the various petty businesses of the Constituency I represent; and a wearying correspondence with hundreds of people I am unacquainted with, but who insist o
o have reminded himself that he was the Leader of the Opposition, and showed ill-nature. Harcourt spoke this afternoon, long but without much force. In fact, the strings of the Opposition have been rendered inutile by Kruger's Ultimatum to England, and the Boer invasion. The fact that we are at war checks everybody, and disarms them. July 26th, 1900. To-day has been my last sitting in Parliament, for I have paired for the remainder of the Session, and Dissolution is very probable in September or October. I would not stand again for much! I have never been quite free, after I understood the Parliamentary machine, from a feeling that it degraded me somewhat to be in Parliament. I have, as a Member, less influence than the man in the street. On questions concerning Africa, Dilke, or some other wholly unacquainted with Africa, would be called upon to speak before me. I have far less influence than any writer in a daily newspaper; for he can make his living presence in the
ded himself that he was the Leader of the Opposition, and showed ill-nature. Harcourt spoke this afternoon, long but without much force. In fact, the strings of the Opposition have been rendered inutile by Kruger's Ultimatum to England, and the Boer invasion. The fact that we are at war checks everybody, and disarms them. July 26th, 1900. To-day has been my last sitting in Parliament, for I have paired for the remainder of the Session, and Dissolution is very probable in September or October. I would not stand again for much! I have never been quite free, after I understood the Parliamentary machine, from a feeling that it degraded me somewhat to be in Parliament. I have, as a Member, less influence than the man in the street. On questions concerning Africa, Dilke, or some other wholly unacquainted with Africa, would be called upon to speak before me. I have far less influence than any writer in a daily newspaper; for he can make his living presence in the world felt,
traint aside, and becomes possessed of the most reckless fury. In his secret heart no Member, but thinks, after his own fashion, that it has been due to an interposition of Providence, Fate, Destiny, call it what name you like. I gather so much from the many ways the Members express their astonishment at Kruger throwing down the gauntlet, ending the discussion, and plunging into war. It has been a long duel between the Colonial Office and Krugerism; successive Secretaries of State, since 1881, have tried their best to get the vantage over the old Dutchman, and have either failed miserably, or have just been able to save their faces; but Chamberlain, after four years of ups and downs, at one time almost in disgrace, being most unfairly suspected of abetting the Raid, and always verging on failure, comes out of the duel with flying colours, through the intractable old Dutchman tiring of the long, wordy contest. The Irish have not been so violent as we expected they intended to be
r to tide over an idle hour. They mechanically smile, and do not mind languidly applauding when someone warns them it is time to do so. In my remarks at the close of Sir Alfred Lyall's lecture, I took the opportunity of comparing the French doings at the end of the eighteenth century with those at the end of the nineteenth century, and predicted that when the French appeared on the White Nile, England would have to speak in no uncertain voice to France, or all our toils and expense, since 1882, in Egypt and the Soudan, would have to be considered wasted. My earnest words roused our friends a little; then Lord Brassey, a typical Gladstonite, thinking I might lead them over to France, instanter, poured cold water upon the heat and said, You know it is only Mr. Stanley's way; he is always combative! Poor, dear old England! How she is bothered with sentimentalists and cranks! South Africa is almost lost, because no Englishman in office dares to say Stop! That is England's. Y
Chapter XXIV farewell to Parliament London, Thursday, May 19th, 1898. Presided at Sir Alfred Lyall's lecture, on Chartered companies and Colonization, before the Society of Arts. I have always a feeling, when observing an audience in England, that the people who appear to be listening are engaged upon their own particular thoughts. I have sometimes said to myself, Life with such people is not an earnest affair. They have come, out of sheer amiability, or to tide over an idle hour. They mechanically smile, and do not mind languidly applauding when someone warns them it is time to do so. In my remarks at the close of Sir Alfred Lyall's lecture, I took the opportunity of comparing the French doings at the end of the eighteenth century with those at the end of the nineteenth century, and predicted that when the French appeared on the White Nile, England would have to speak in no uncertain voice to France, or all our toils and expense, since 1882, in Egypt and the Soudan, wo
November 1st, 1898 AD (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.28
d a way of re-arming the Mahdists; and it would not be long then before we should be driven out of Egypt, and clean away from the Suez Canal. Well, and then? But what is the use? A cold water speech from Lord Brassey quenches, or appears to, any little patriotic ardour that our Society Englishmen confess to having felt. If these people were to be consulted, they would vote for making England as small as she was in the pre-Alfred days, on condition they were not to be agitated. November 1st, 1898. Am gradually gaining strength after the illness which began in the South of France, August 15th. The long weeks in bed have given me abundant time for thought, and I have decided that the time has come for me to seek my long-desired rest. It has become clearer to me, each day, that I am too old to change my open-air habits for the asphyxiating atmosphere of the House of Commons. Consequent upon this Parliamentary life are the various petty businesses of the Constituency I repr
erlain. Campbell-Bannerman spoke with two voices; in the first half of his speech he talked like an English patriot, in the latter half he seemed to have reminded himself that he was the Leader of the Opposition, and showed ill-nature. Harcourt spoke this afternoon, long but without much force. In fact, the strings of the Opposition have been rendered inutile by Kruger's Ultimatum to England, and the Boer invasion. The fact that we are at war checks everybody, and disarms them. July 26th, 1900. To-day has been my last sitting in Parliament, for I have paired for the remainder of the Session, and Dissolution is very probable in September or October. I would not stand again for much! I have never been quite free, after I understood the Parliamentary machine, from a feeling that it degraded me somewhat to be in Parliament. I have, as a Member, less influence than the man in the street. On questions concerning Africa, Dilke, or some other wholly unacquainted with Afric
; but Chamberlain, after four years of ups and downs, at one time almost in disgrace, being most unfairly suspected of abetting the Raid, and always verging on failure, comes out of the duel with flying colours, through the intractable old Dutchman tiring of the long, wordy contest. The Irish have not been so violent as we expected they intended to be. We heard of a wish to be suspended; but, on the whole, they have been tame: though Willie Redmond did not spare Chamberlain. Campbell-Bannerman spoke with two voices; in the first half of his speech he talked like an English patriot, in the latter half he seemed to have reminded himself that he was the Leader of the Opposition, and showed ill-nature. Harcourt spoke this afternoon, long but without much force. In fact, the strings of the Opposition have been rendered inutile by Kruger's Ultimatum to England, and the Boer invasion. The fact that we are at war checks everybody, and disarms them. July 26th, 1900. To-day has bee
heir faces; but Chamberlain, after four years of ups and downs, at one time almost in disgrace, being most unfairly suspected of abetting the Raid, and always verging on failure, comes out of the duel with flying colours, through the intractable old Dutchman tiring of the long, wordy contest. The Irish have not been so violent as we expected they intended to be. We heard of a wish to be suspended; but, on the whole, they have been tame: though Willie Redmond did not spare Chamberlain. Campbell-Bannerman spoke with two voices; in the first half of his speech he talked like an English patriot, in the latter half he seemed to have reminded himself that he was the Leader of the Opposition, and showed ill-nature. Harcourt spoke this afternoon, long but without much force. In fact, the strings of the Opposition have been rendered inutile by Kruger's Ultimatum to England, and the Boer invasion. The fact that we are at war checks everybody, and disarms them. July 26th, 1900. To-da
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