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Pirbright (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
shire, Berkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surrey, and, at the first glance, she said it was delightful, and could be made ideal. The more we examined it, the more we liked it; but there was much to improve and renovate. Therefore, as the place pleased me and my wife and her mother, I entered into serious negotiations for the purchase, and by Christmas, I had secured the refusal of it; but as it was let, possession was deferred to the loth of June, 1899. Furze Hill is not more than thirty miles from London, but it is in wild
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
o see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surrey, and, at the first glance, she said it was delightful, and could be made ideal. The more we examined it, the more we liked it; but there was much to improve and renovate. Therefore, as the place pleased me and my wife and her mother, I entered into serious negotiations for the purchase, and by Christmas, I had secured the refusal of it; but as it was let, possession was deferred to the loth of June, 1899. Furze Hill is not more than thirty miles from London, but it is in wild and lovely country, wild and lovely because kept so, by the War Department, for manoeuvring grounds. The country around mostly consists of great stretches of furze and heather, which are golden and purple in summer, and rough pine woods. No one can buy land here, or build; and Furze Hill is planted in this beautiful wilderness, just a house, gardens, a few fields, a wood, and a quiet lake, fed by a little stream. Furze Hill now became a great pleasure and occupation.
Berkshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
decision, that it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the advertisements of places likely to suit, sorted them according to localities, and then went to work visiting them systematically. In his Journal he writes:-- Between November 15th and 30th, I have seen twenty places, in Kent, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surre
r, but then the ridiculous absurdity of her story struck me so forcibly, I began to laugh, and the more I laughed, the more pained and bewildered was my friend. You believed that story? I asked. You could believe it? Well, she replied, I was told it, as a fact. When I repeated it to Stanley, he smiled and threw out his hand. There, you see now why I am silent and reserved. . . . Would you have me reply to such a charge? And then he told me the story of the little black baby in Central Africa. As the expedition advanced, we generally found villages abandoned, scouts having warned the natives of our approach. The villagers, of course, were not very far off, and, as soon as the expedition had passed, they stole back to their huts and plantations. On one occasion, so great had been their haste, a black baby of a few months old was left on the ground, forgotten. They brought the little thing to me; it was just a gobbet of fat, with large, innocent eyes. Holding the baby
Buckingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
ing come to a decision, that it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the advertisements of places likely to suit, sorted them according to localities, and then went to work visiting them systematically. In his Journal he writes:-- Between November 15th and 30th, I have seen twenty places, in Kent, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pi
Sussex (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
t it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the advertisements of places likely to suit, sorted them according to localities, and then went to work visiting them systematically. In his Journal he writes:-- Between November 15th and 30th, I have seen twenty places, in Kent, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surrey, and, at the
Surrey (United Kingdom) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
rkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surrey, and, at the first glance, she said it was delightful, and could be made ideal. The more we examined it, the more we liked it; but there was much to improve and renovate. Therefore, as the place pleased me and my wife and her mother, I entered into serious negotiations for the purchase, and by Christmas, I had secured the refusal of it; but as it was let, possession was deferred to the loth of June, 1899. Furze Hill is not more than thirty miles from London, but it is in wild and lovel
Whitehall (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.29
Chapter XXV Furze Hill in the autumn of 1898, Stanley decided to look for a house in the country. We had lived, since our marriage, at 2, Richmond Terrace, Whitehall, close to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey; but though we were near the Thames and St. James Park, Stanley naturally felt the need of a more open-air life. We therefore decided to have a country retreat, as well as the home in town. In his Journal, November 1, 1898, he writes:-- To live at all, I must have open air, and to enjoy the open air, I must move briskly. I but wait to have a little more strength, when I can begin the search for a suitable house, with some land attached. It has long been my wish, and the mere thought of having come to a decision, that it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the advert
anley gave her a bathing-house and canoes. I gave her roses. One day Stanley told me that a case full of books had just arrived, which we could unpack together in the evening. The case was opened, and I greatly rejoiced at the prospect of book-shelves crammed with thrilling novels, and stories of adventure. Stanley carefully removed the layers of packing-paper, and then commenced handing out . . . translations of the Classics, Euripides, Xenophon again, Thucydides, Polybius, Herodotus, Caesar, Homer; piles of books on architecture, on landscape gardening, on house decoration; books on ancient ships, on modern ship-building. Not a book for me! I exclaimed dismally. Next week, another case arrived, and this time all the standard fiction, and many new books, were ranged on shelves awaiting them. Stanley's appetite for work in one shape or another was insatiable, and the trouble he took was always a surprise, even to me. Nothing he undertook was done in a half-and-half way. I h
s an Egyptian, rather a sullen fellow; I think his name was Selim. His wife, a pleasant young woman, died during the march, One evening, going his usual round amongst the men, he saw Selim's little boy, the child with the sallow face, and large, mort, as though overlooked. The next day, Stanley sent for Selim's baby, and there on a mat at his tent door, the child sat he told me. Some weeks later, Stanley was informed that Selim was a goeegoee, a lazy fellow, and that he had thrown his gedition depended on their being able to defend themselves. Selim was severely punished, and the expedition continued its difired what had become of him. Alas! Master, was the report, Selim got tired of carrying his boy, so he left him in the Forestied, had I but known. The next week it was reported that Selim was attacked by the fatal indisposition of sitting down. Ho the depths of the Forest, to sit down and die. Stanley halted the expedition, search was made, but Selim had gone for ever!
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