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was supposed to be destitute of anything but timber. Australia has been frequently contemptuously alluded to. The Congo possesses splendid inland navigation, abundance of copper, nitre, gold, palm oil, nuts, copal, rubber, ivory, fibre for rope and paper, excellent grasses for matting, nets, and fishing-lines, timber for furniture and ship-building. All this could have belonged to Great Britain, but was refused. Alas! The Duke of Wellington replied to the New Zealand Association, in 1838, that Great Britain had sufficient colonies, even though New Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General Gordon. 1892 I have often wondered at Gordon; in his place I should have acted differently. It was optional with Gordon to live or die; he preferred to die; I should have lived, if only to get the better of the Mahdi. With joy of striving, and fierce delight of thwarting, I should have dogged and harassed the Mahdi, like Nemesis, until I had him down.
ert, and wise, and unless we learn to do the proper thing at the right moment — for to this end was our intellect and education given us. Pious missionaries, even while engaged in worship, have been massacred at the altar. The white skin of the baptised European avails nothing against the arrow. Holy amulets and crosses are no protection against the spear. Faith, without awakened faculties and sharp exercise of them, is no shield at all against lawless violence! Written in Africa, in 1876, in a note-book One of the first sweet and novel pleasures a man experiences in the wilds of Africa, is the almost perfect independence; the next thing is the indifference to all things earthly outside his camp; and that, let people talk as they may, is one of the most exquisite, soul-lulling pleasures a mortal can enjoy. These two almost balance the pains inflicted by the climate. In Europe, care ages a man soon enough; and it is well known that it was care which killed the cat ! In Afr
the institutions of his country, thus preparing him for the cultivation and enjoyment of more perfect happiness at home. After one of his expeditions Stanley writes: When a man returns home and finds for the moment nothing to struggle against, the vast resolve, which has sustained him through a long and difficult enterprise, dies away, burning as it sinks in the heart; and thus the greatest successes are often accompanied by a peculiar melancholy. On the Government of the Congo 1896. The King of the Belgians has often desired me to go back to the Congo; but to go back, would be to see mistakes consummated, to be tortured daily by seeing the effects of an erring and ignorant policy. I would be tempted to re-constitute a great part of the governmental machine, and this would be to disturb a moral malaria injurious to the re-organiser. We have become used to call vast, deep layers of filth, Augean stables: what shall we call years of stupid government, mischievous encroac
ess, I hold that Gordon need not have died! Henry Morton Stanley large shall his name be writ, with that strong line, Of heroes, martyrs, soldiers, saints, who gave Their lives to chart the waste, and free the slave, In the dim Continent where his beacons shine. Rightly they call him Breaker of the Path, Who was no cloistered spirit, remote and sage, But a swift swordsman of our wrestling age, Warm in his love, and sudden in his wrath. How many a weary league beneath the Sun The tireless foot had traced, that lies so still. Now sinks the craftsman's hand, the sovereign will; Now sleeps the unsleeping brain, the day's work done. Muffle the drums and let the death-notes roll, One of the mightier dead is with us here; Honour the vanward's Chief, the Pioneer, Do fitting reverence to a warrior soul. But far away his monument shall be, In the wide lands he opened to the light, By the dark Forest of the tropic night, And his great River winding to the Sea. Sidney Low. May 13, 1904.
uld have been no danger of starvation, as I should have turned all undesirables out. Then, as a last resource, there was the Nile. My one idea would have been to carry out what I had undertaken to do, without any outside help. If I had gone to Khartoum to rescue the garrison, the garrison would have been rescued! When Gordon started, this is what he undertook to do; there was no thought, or question, of sending a rescue expedition. It was failure all round — Gordon failed first, then Gladstone and the Government. But I have refrained from all public expression of opinion, because it is not permitted in England to criticise Gordon; and, besides, he was a true hero, and he died nobly. That silences one: nevertheless, I hold that Gordon need not have died! Henry Morton Stanley large shall his name be writ, with that strong line, Of heroes, martyrs, soldiers, saints, who gave Their lives to chart the waste, and free the slave, In the dim Continent where his beacons shine.
Charles George Gordon (search for this): part 2.13, chapter 2.32
ht become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General Gordon. 1892 I have often wondered at Gordon; in his place I should have acted differently. It was optional with Gordon to live or die; he preferred to die; I should have lived, ie do not realise how ready, nay eager, they were to do so. Gordon said to an interviewer, before starting, The moment it is le. It would not have been difficult to get to Berber, if Gordon had started without delay, in fact, as soon as he had fort the garrison, the garrison would have been rescued! When Gordon started, this is what he undertook to do; there was no thof sending a rescue expedition. It was failure all round — Gordon failed first, then Gladstone and the Government. But I inion, because it is not permitted in England to criticise Gordon; and, besides, he was a true hero, and he died nobly. That silences one: nevertheless, I hold that Gordon need not have died! Henry Morton Stanley large shall his name be writ,
Africa to have been possessed of many ignoble thoughts; but I do remember, very well, to have had, often and often, very lofty ideas concerning the regeneration, civilisation, and redemption of Africa, and the benefiting of England through her trade and commerce; besides other possible and impossible objects. If one had only the means, such and such things would be possible of realisation ! I am continually thinking thus, and I do not doubt they formed principally the dream-life in which Livingstone passed almost all his leisure hours. Another enduring pleasure is that which is derived from exploration of new, unvisited, and undescribed regions; for, daily, it forms part of my enjoyment, especially while on the march. Each eminence is eagerly climbed in the hope of viewing new prospects, each forest is traversed with a strong idea prevailing that at the other end some grand feature of nature may be revealed; the morrow's journey is longed for, in the hope that something new may b
oughts, or petty interests, but now preens itself, and soars free and unrestrained; which liberty, to a vivid mind, imperceptibly changes the whole man after a while. No luxury in civilisation can be equal to the relief from the tyranny of custom. The wilds of a great city are better than the excruciating tyranny of a small village. The heart of Africa is infinitely preferable to the heart of the world's greatest city. If the way to it was smooth and safe, millions would fly to it. But London is better than Paris, and Paris is better than Berlin, and Berlin is better than St. Petersburg. The West invited thousands from the East of America to be relieved of the grasp of tyrannous custom. The Australians breathe freer after leaving England, and get bigger in body and larger in nature. I do not remember while here in Africa to have been possessed of many ignoble thoughts; but I do remember, very well, to have had, often and often, very lofty ideas concerning the regeneration, c
ss, I hold that Gordon need not have died! Henry Morton Stanley large shall his name be writ, with that strong line, Of heroes, martyrs, soldiers, saints, who gave Their lives to chart the waste, and free the slave, In the dim Continent where his beacons shine. Rightly they call him Breaker of the Path, Who was no cloistered spirit, remote and sage, But a swift swordsman of our wrestling age, Warm in his love, and sudden in his wrath. How many a weary league beneath the Sun The tireless foot had traced, that lies so still. Now sinks the craftsman's hand, the sovereign will; Now sleeps the unsleeping brain, the day's work done. Muffle the drums and let the death-notes roll, One of the mightier dead is with us here; Honour the vanward's Chief, the Pioneer, Do fitting reverence to a warrior soul. But far away his monument shall be, In the wide lands he opened to the light, By the dark Forest of the tropic night, And his great River winding to the Sea. Sidney Low. May 13, 1904.
Zealand Association, in 1838, that Great Britain had sufficient colonies, even though New Zealand might become a jewel in England's colonial crown! On General Gordon. 1892 I have often wondered at Gordon; in his place I should have acted differently. It was optional with Gordon to live or die; he preferred to die; I should have lived, if only to get the better of the Mahdi. With joy of striving, and fierce delight of thwarting, I should have dogged and harassed the Mahdi, like Nemesis, until I had him down. I maintain that to live is harder and nobler than to die; to bear life's burdens, suffer its sorrows, endure its agonies, is the greater heroism. The relief of Khartoum, that is to say, removing the garrison and those anxious to leave, was at first, comparatively speaking, an easy task. I should have commenced by rendering my position impregnable, by building triple fortifications inside Khartoum, abutting on the Nile, with boats and steamers ever ready. No Ma
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