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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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ngineer, was found to be one hundred and four feet. By the original survey from Billerica to Chelmsford, the surveyor says, The water we estimate in the Merrimac at sixteen and one-half feet above that at Billerica Bridge, and the distance six miles; when, in fact, the water at Billerica Bridge is about twenty-five feet above the Merrimac at Chelmsford. This report shows one of the many difficulties the directors had to contend with for the want of requisite scientific knowledge. On the first (lay of March, the directors passed a vote, appointing Loammi Baldwin, Esq., to repair to Philadelphia, and endeavor to obtain Mr. Weston's (an English engineer) assistance in conducting the canal. If he cannot come, then that lie endeavor to obtain some other person who shall be recommended by Mr. Weston; and that said agent be authorized to write to Europe for some suitable person for the undertaking, if none can be found elsewhere. Col. Baldwin Lade a lengthy and able report on the twel
ton at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this did not much lessen the expenses of transportation, but increased the risks of fracture. The high price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limits of Medford. The record concerning it is as fo
ound to be one hundred and four feet. By the original survey from Billerica to Chelmsford, the surveyor says, The water we estimate in the Merrimac at sixteen and one-half feet above that at Billerica Bridge, and the distance six miles; when, in fact, the water at Billerica Bridge is about twenty-five feet above the Merrimac at Chelmsford. This report shows one of the many difficulties the directors had to contend with for the want of requisite scientific knowledge. On the first (lay of March, the directors passed a vote, appointing Loammi Baldwin, Esq., to repair to Philadelphia, and endeavor to obtain Mr. Weston's (an English engineer) assistance in conducting the canal. If he cannot come, then that lie endeavor to obtain some other person who shall be recommended by Mr. Weston; and that said agent be authorized to write to Europe for some suitable person for the undertaking, if none can be found elsewhere. Col. Baldwin Lade a lengthy and able report on the twelfth day of May
efore necessary to be preserved, &c. The act provides that each of the three towns is empowered to choose a committee for the preservation of fish, whose duty it shall be to keep out of the river all obstructions to the free ingress of the fish. The act grants to Cambridge the right to fish, within the limits of that town, on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday; and to Charlestown and Medford the right of fishing, within the limits of those towns, on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,--from the first of March to the last day of June. Penalty for each violation of the law, three pounds. In this act, the right of each inhabitant to fish is recognized and secured. If persons from other towns should either stop or catch fish in this river, they shall each be fined three pounds for every such offence; and the committee shall have power to arrest them, and sell their seines, dragnets, marsh-nets, baskets, or any other implements used by them. This act to be in use five years, and no longer. I
ely, for the term of seven years from this day. May 18, 1631: It is ordered that every plantation within the limits of this patent shall, before the last day of June next, provide common weights and measures, which shall be made by some which the governor hath already sealed, and by which also all others that will have weights nd to Charlestown and Medford the right of fishing, within the limits of those towns, on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,--from the first of March to the last day of June. Penalty for each violation of the law, three pounds. In this act, the right of each inhabitant to fish is recognized and secured. If persons from other towns she a lengthy and able report on the twelfth day of May, 1794. Among other things, he says he has engaged Mr. Weston to make the survey of the route in the month of June, and closes his report as follows: I consider the prospects before us, in this undertaking, much more flattering in respect to the execution of the work, ill propo
tally curtailed. The bricks were carted to Boston at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this did not much lessen the expenses of transportation, but increased the risks of fracture. The high price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limit
g, if none can be found elsewhere. Col. Baldwin Lade a lengthy and able report on the twelfth day of May, 1794. Among other things, he says he has engaged Mr. Weston to make the survey of the route in the month of June, and closes his report as follows: I consider the prospects before us, in this undertaking, much more flattering in respect to the execution of the work, ill proportion to the extent, than any I have seen in tile Southern States, tile Washington Canal excepted. About the 15th of July, Mr. Weston arrived; and a committee, consisting of Loammi Baldwin and Samuel Jaques, was appointed to attend him during his survey and observations relating to the canal. The survey was completed, and a full report made by Mr. Weston, on the second day of August, 1794. Agents were immediately appointed to carry on the work, to commence at Billerica Mills, on Concord River, and first complete the level to the Merrimac, at North Chelmsford. The season having so far advanced, but little
August 9th (search for this): chapter 11
belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and therefore within the limits of Medford. The record concerning it is as follows: July 4, 1631. The governor built a bark at Mistick, which was launched this day, and called the blessing of the Bay. Aug. 9, the same year, the governor's bark, being of thirty tons, went to sea. It cost one hundred and forty-five pounds. The owner said of it, May 16, 1636, I will sell her for one hundred and sixty pounds. There was something singularly prophetic in the fact that the first vessel built at Mistick should have so increased in price after five years of service. Our day has seen the prophecy fulfilled; as it is no marvel now for a Medford ship to command a higher price after having had a fair
was built,--thirty-one feet long, and twenty-five wide. John Willis and Benjamin Parker gave liberty to the undertakers to cut a ditch from Gravelly Creek to the mill, and to build a dam. Dr. Tufts, John Willis, Samuel Page, Thomas Oakes, and Nathaniel Hall, bind themselves never to obstruct the free flow of water to the mill. The undertakers then bind themselves to erect a good gristmill on the spot of land above mentioned; and said mill shall be ready to go at or before the last day of September next. As guaranty for each party, they bind themselves in the penal sum of five hundred pounds. The mill was completed, and answered its purpose. It afterwards came into the possession of Timothy Waite, jun. He sold it to Seth Blodget, March 9, 1761. Mr. Blodget sold it to Matthew Bridge, Oct. 18, 1780. Mr. Bridge sold one half of it to John Bishop, April 7, 1783; and sold the other half to John Bishop, jun., April 29, 1784. John Bishop sold the whole to Gershom Cutter, who sold to S
as been to be often run upon, and on which the draughts have been so much greater than the deposits that it long ago became bankrupt; yet, like an honest tradesman, it has never despaired; and, within our memory, has made some good fat dividends. In 1770, the sludge from the distilleries was supposed to have poisoned these shell-fish. Lobsters have not frequented our river in great numbers; but, in 1854, they came up in large companies as far as Chelsea Bridge; and, in the warm month of October, more than two thousand, of prime quality, were taken from that bridge! The names of all the fishermen in Medford cannot be recovered; but, among them, there have been men of that great energy which secures success. The fish found their market chiefly in Boston; and were sometimes cured, and sent in barrels to the Southern States, as food for slaves, or to the West Indies for common consumption. Many were smoked, after the manner of herring, and eaten in New England; many more were u
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