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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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vented a new kind, called sheathing felt, used for covering the bottoms of ships: it can also be placed under the copper, and is much used in covering steam-boilers and pipes. The making of linseed oil was carried on by Mr. George L. Stearns, on land about fifty rods south of Mystic Bridge. He imported his seed from Calcutta. A convention of manufacturers of this oil was held at New York in 1841; and they agreed to send a committee to Washington, to induce Congress to shape the tariff of 1842 so as to protect them. The committee succeeded; and Mr. Stearns was one of them. The effect was the opposite of what they expected: it induced so many new men to begin the business that it ruined it. From 1835, the manufactory in Medford continued in operation to 1845, when it suspended activity. It resumed work for a year, when the building was burned in 1847. The factory of Messrs. Waterman and Litchfield, for the making of doors, blinds, window-sashes, &c., is a large and flourishing
to the manufacture of all kinds of feltings and lambs'-wool wadding. Among the feltings he has invented a new kind, called sheathing felt, used for covering the bottoms of ships: it can also be placed under the copper, and is much used in covering steam-boilers and pipes. The making of linseed oil was carried on by Mr. George L. Stearns, on land about fifty rods south of Mystic Bridge. He imported his seed from Calcutta. A convention of manufacturers of this oil was held at New York in 1841; and they agreed to send a committee to Washington, to induce Congress to shape the tariff of 1842 so as to protect them. The committee succeeded; and Mr. Stearns was one of them. The effect was the opposite of what they expected: it induced so many new men to begin the business that it ruined it. From 1835, the manufactory in Medford continued in operation to 1845, when it suspended activity. It resumed work for a year, when the building was burned in 1847. The factory of Messrs. Water
May, 1639 AD (search for this): chapter 11
shillings on every share of fish caught by strangers at the Cape. From all that we can gather, we conclude that Mr. Cradock had invested as much as fifteen thousand dollars, which in various trade here must have made Medford a thriving and populous plantation for an infant settlement. The fishing business continued for fifteen or twenty years, but with less and less profit to Mr. Cradock. It was finally abandoned as a failure; and afterwards the river-fishing alone claimed attention. May, 1639: The price of alewives in Medford, at this time, was five shillings per thousand. This made food incredibly cheap. That Mystic River, as a resort for fish, was early known and greatly valued, appears from many testimonies. In Josselyn's account of his two voyages to New England (1638) we have the following record: The river Mistick runs through the right side of the town (Charlestown), and, by its near approach to Charles River in one place, makes a very narrow neck, where stands most
he petitioners for the Lowell Railroad, in asking for a charter for their road. There is only one difference in the two cases. The proprietors of Charles River Bridge had received over and over again the cost of the bridge, and interest on the same; whilst the proprietors of the canal have received but one and thirty-nine hundredths of one per cent interest on the cost,--their whole expenditure, by the unreasonable act of the Legislature, being now rendered of nominal or little value. In 1851, it was thought best by the proprietors to surrender the charter, wind up the concern, sell the property, and divide the proceeds. In 1852, it was sold at auction, in sections; and they who owned land upon its borders were, in most cases, the purchasers. The process of filling it up commenced so soon, and has been prosecuted so diligently, that all traces of this full artery have, in many sections, wholly disappeared; but we truly hope that the solid stone bridge, built by the Hon. Peter C.
e shad and alewives were abundant till 1815 or 1820, when they began gradually to withhold their visits. A writer says, that, about the year 1800, it was common to take fifteen hundred shad annually at Little River (near Fresh Pond); but that, in 1852, there was not one taken; and that, proportionally, a similar statement might be made concerning alewives. Nothing can frighten alewives; but the shad is an exceedingly shy and timid fish. Its disappearance from our river is therefore attributenditure, by the unreasonable act of the Legislature, being now rendered of nominal or little value. In 1851, it was thought best by the proprietors to surrender the charter, wind up the concern, sell the property, and divide the proceeds. In 1852, it was sold at auction, in sections; and they who owned land upon its borders were, in most cases, the purchasers. The process of filling it up commenced so soon, and has been prosecuted so diligently, that all traces of this full artery have, i
seth the channel. This oyster-bank is one of those unfortunate institutions whose fate it has been to be often run upon, and on which the draughts have been so much greater than the deposits that it long ago became bankrupt; yet, like an honest tradesman, it has never despaired; and, within our memory, has made some good fat dividends. In 1770, the sludge from the distilleries was supposed to have poisoned these shell-fish. Lobsters have not frequented our river in great numbers; but, in 1854, they came up in large companies as far as Chelsea Bridge; and, in the warm month of October, more than two thousand, of prime quality, were taken from that bridge! The names of all the fishermen in Medford cannot be recovered; but, among them, there have been men of that great energy which secures success. The fish found their market chiefly in Boston; and were sometimes cured, and sent in barrels to the Southern States, as food for slaves, or to the West Indies for common consumption.
ssels built here, estimating the hull, spars, and blocks of each at forty-five dollars per ton. The register has been brought down, for this history, from 1846 to 1855. From this register, it appears that five hundred and thirteen vessels have been built in Medford between the beginning of the present century and the year 18551855, with an aggregate of two hundred and thirty-two thousand two hundred and six tons; and at a cost, according to the above estimate, of ten millions four hundred and forty-nine thousand two hundred and seventy dollars. The greatest number constructed in any one yard is one hundred and eighty-five; and, in any single year , thirty.4: Voted that the selectmen be appointed a committee to dispose of the privilege of taking shad and alewives within the limits of said town the ensuing season. In 1855, Joseph L. Wheeler bought the upper reach, from Marble Brook to the Pond, for $27.50 per annum; and James Rogers bought the lower reach, from Marble Brook to the e
t the outlet of the Pond; and, as our river was the notedest place for fish in the early days of our plantation, we presume that the seine, being a net sent to fish with, was the first seine ever drawn in its waters, and the first drawn on this continent. This was probably in 1631; and the first draught was doubtless an event of liveliest interest, of raw wonder, and exceeding joy. If any web or filament of that pioneer seine had come down to us, it would be fitting for the town, in the year 1881, to parade it as the banner, and under it to unite in celebrating the fifth fishermen's jubilee on the river. June 6, 1639: It is ordered that all wears shall be set open from the last day of the week, at noon, till the second day in the morning. Johnson, in his Wonder-working Providence, says, The Lord is pleased to provide for them great store of fish in the spring-time, and especially alewives, about the bigness of a herring. Many thousands of these they use to put under their Indian
August 2nd, 1794 AD (search for this): chapter 11
er the prospects before us, in this undertaking, much more flattering in respect to the execution of the work, ill proportion to the extent, than any I have seen in tile Southern States, tile Washington Canal excepted. About the 15th of July, Mr. Weston arrived; and a committee, consisting of Loammi Baldwin and Samuel Jaques, was appointed to attend him during his survey and observations relating to the canal. The survey was completed, and a full report made by Mr. Weston, on the second day of August, 1794. Agents were immediately appointed to carry on the work, to commence at Billerica Mills, on Concord River, and first complete the level to the Merrimac, at North Chelmsford. The season having so far advanced, but little could be done until the next spring, except purchasing materials and making contracts for future operations. The work was prosecuted with great caution, from the commencement to the year 1803, at which time it was so far completed as to be navigable from the Merr
April 8th, 1630 AD (search for this): chapter 11
, the Medford trade was fatally curtailed. The bricks were carted to Boston at great cost, which gave the yards in Charlestown an advantage over ours. If they were taken in lighters, by the river, this did not much lessen the expenses of transportation, but increased the risks of fracture. The high price of labor, of wood, and of cartage, rendered competition unwise; and the manufacture of bricks has ceased. Ship-building. Governor Winthrop sailed from Cowes, in England, on Thursday, April 8, 1630. On Saturday, June 12, he reached Boston Bay; and, on the 17th of that month, he makes the following record: Went up Mistick River about six miles. To this heroic and Christian adventurer belongs the honor of building the first vessel whose keel was laid in this part of the Western World; and that vessel was built on the bank of Mystic River, and probably not far from the governor's house at Ten Hills. There is a tradition that it was built on the north shore of the river, and
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